Displaying items by tag: PTSD

Review written by Devon Thompson

WELCOME TO MARWEN

Universal Pictures, DreamWorks and ImageMovers present a PG-13, 116 minute, Biography, Comedy, Drama, directed by Robert Zemeckis, screenplay by Zemeckis and Caroline Thompson with a theatre release date of December 21, 2018.

Thank You For Your Service

Theatre Release date 10/27/17

Talkin' Pets News

11/12/2016

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jeremy Miller

Producer - Amanda Page

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Edward Meyer from Ripley's Believe It or Not will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 11/12/16 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away their new book "Unlock the Weird"

Founder of Down Dog Snacks Jessie Walker will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 11/12/2016 at 630pm EST to discuss and give away her dog snacks

 

The More Pet Owners Learn about Scientific Research on the Benefits of the Human-Animal Bond, the Better They’ll Care for their Companion Animals

(Washington, D.C.) September 7, 2016 – The Human Animal Bond Research Initiative (HABRI) Foundation today announced the findings of a new survey on the impact of knowledge of the scientific benefits of the human-animal bond on how pet owners care for their companion animals. The survey asked pet owners about their awareness of research that shows pets improve human health and found that this knowledge has the power to motivate them to take better care of their pets in important ways.

“Scientific research shows that pets are good for our health, improving heart health, relieving stress and positively impacting conditions from autism to PTSD,” said HABRI Executive Director, Steven Feldman. “Now, for the first time, we have data to show that it’s a two-way street – when we know how good pets are for us, we are more likely to take better care of them!”

According to the survey, seventy-one percent of pet owners were aware of scientifically-documented health benefits from pets. Most importantly, when asked how knowledge of the scientific research on the human-animal bond would affect their actions:

  • 89% of pet owners said they were more likely to take better care of their pets
  • 75% of pet owners said they were more likely to microchip a pet to ensure it can be found if lost or stolen
  • 51% of pet owners said they were more likely to purchase pet health insurance
  • 62% of pet owners said they were less likely to skip visits to the veterinarian
  • 74% of pet owners said they were less likely to give up a pet for any reason
  • 88% of pet owners said they were more likely to provide their pets with high-quality nutrition
  • 92% of pet owners said they were more likely to maintain their pet’s health, including keeping up with vaccines and preventative medicine

The survey also examined how different generations of pet owners viewed and reacted to the human-animal bond. For millennials, in particular, learning about the scientific research on the health benefits of pets had a large impact:

  • 80% of millennials said this information makes them more likely to bring their pet along when they go out
  • 75% of millennials said this information makes them more likely to travel with their pets 
  • 74% of millennials said this information makes them more likely to get an additional pet
  • 74% of millennials think employers should consider allowing employees to bring pets to work

“When pet owners are educated about the scientific research on the human-animal bond, the response is tremendously positive for the welfare of the pet population,” said researcher Michael Cohen, Ph.D. “This research tells me that veterinarians and animal shelters should be talking about the benefits of pets to human health.”

The survey also asked pet owners about increased support for pet ownership in society:

  • 84% agree health and life insurance companies should give discounts for owing a pet
  • 87% would be more likely to buy products from pet-friendly businesses
  • 69% agree the government should help make it more affordable to own a pet
  • 88% agree doctors and specialists should recommend pets to patients for healthier living

“As HABRI continues to fund human-animal bond research, it will work hard to educate pet owners and the general public about the positive impacts of pet ownership on human health,” Feldman added. “As more people experience the healing power of the human-animal bond, more and more pets can get the highest level of care and welfare.”

The online survey, conducted by the Cohen Research Group, included 2,000 interviews and had a margin of error of +2.2%.

The HABRI Foundation maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information about the HABRI Foundation, visit www.habri.org.

 

Boulder Crest Retreat, a free therapeutic retreat for combat veterans, includes equine therapy in their program

BLUEMONT, Virginia – (April 4, 2016) –Winston Churchill once noted, “The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a man.” This idea – that horses have the power to lift our spirits, make us feel loved, and create a sense of internal peace – is well known to many people across this country. What many people may not realize is that horses can play a critical role in empowering veterans to make the journey all the way home from war, and begin walking a new path – full of passion, purpose and service – here at home. There are remarkable programs all across the country leveraging horses healing abilities, and a range of other animals, to support our nation’s combat veterans.

“Horse Inspired Growth and Healing (HIGH) is an important part of every program we run in support of combat veterans and their families,” explains Ken Falke, chairman and founder of Boulder Crest Retreat. “Within just a few minutes of being around the horses, and working with our team, we see a tremendous difference. Faces light up, burdens wash away, and smiles reappear. There is something profound and deeply special about the manner in which horses work with those who are struggling – they have an internal recognition of exactly what each person needs.”

There have been numerous studies supporting the idea that equine therapy helps those who are struggling, and a recent study published in Biology Letters demonstrated that horses have the ability to recognize human emotions and facial expressions.

Recently, in the January 2016 issue of the journal Social Work, researchers reported that nearly half of all combat veterans suffer from serious psychological disorders and reintegration issues. They report that equine-facilitated mental health programs have demonstrated promise in treating veterans with (PTSD) depressive and anxiety disorders, as well as reintegration issues.

At Boulder Crest Retreat, combat veterans engage in an equine therapy program in addition to the other progressive therapeutic activities that make up the program. The retreat offers combat veterans and their families the opportunity to stay for a week at the 37-acre retreat, where they can engage in a full treatment plan. The equine therapy program is facilitated by Suzi Landolphi, who has a master’s degree in clinical and community psychology and is a licensed marriage and family therapist. She is also the author of two books, and has created a program offering Horse Inspired Growth and Healing (HIGH) and Horse Inspired Psychotherapy (HIP), which utilizes horses to:

  • Encourage. Horse therapy encourages veterans and their family members to feel safe enough to reconnect their mind and their heart, and express themselves.

  • Connect. It allows veterans and their family members to better connect with themselves and their loved ones.

  • Renew. Help veterans move through their fears, let go of traumatic experiences, begin to feel a sense of calm and peace, and live in the present.

“Because most of us have experienced hurt from humans, whether in combat or at home, we shy away from expressing how we are feeling to fellow humans,” explains Landolphi. “Horses walk right though our emotional defenses and encourage us to be open hearted and open minded to a more authentic way of living, first, with ourselves, and then with the members of our human herd.”

Boulder Crest Retreat utilizes a range of age-old and evidence-based modalities designed to offer greater clarity, increase connection and facilitate growth and healing. In addition to equine therapy, the Retreat offers art, music, meditation, yoga, kayaking, hiking, horticultural, nutrition, and culinary programs. Delivered by a combination of trained combat veteran mentors and world-class therapists, these tools enable combat veterans and their families to transform struggle into strength, and begin living a great life here at home.

The Retreat welcomes wounded active-duty, reserve and National Guard personnel, veterans, their family members and caregivers, and Gold Star Families. Boulder Crest Retreat is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization that is funded entirely by private donations by individuals and organizations from around the country. For more information about the retreat, please go to www.bouldercrestretreat.org. View a video about the Boulder Crest Retreat here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KztgmScOQLw.

ABOUT BOULDER CREST RETREAT

Boulder Crest Retreat for Military and Veteran Wellness is a rural sanctuary that provides free accommodations, recreational and therapeutic activities and programs to help our nation’s military and veteran personnel and their families recover and reconnect during their long journey of healing from physical and invisible wounds of war. The 37-acre retreat is located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Bluemont, Virginia, just 50 miles west of Washington, D.C. The Retreat is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and is entirely funded through private donations from individuals, foundations and corporations. For more information about Boulder Crest Retreat, please visit www.bouldercrestretreat.org.

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SMITHTOWN, NY – (September 21, 2015) – Pairing service dogs with military veterans suffering from PTSD has proven to help the healing process. According to the National Center for Health Research, studies have shown that a dog’s presence, loyalty and love are known to improve heart health by lowering blood pressure and regulating the heart rate during stressful situations. Paws of War, was founded to help those military veterans by training rescued dogs to be service dogs. Now, their mission is expanding to incorporate a Paws of War Therapy program, in honor and memory of US Air Force Veteran Duane Franzone.

“A few years ago, we saved a pitbull mix, Jada. She’d been living under a dirt crawlspace with a broken jaw. Jada was trained to become Duane’s service dog and she meant the world to him,” says Dori Scofield, executive director of Paws of War. “After Duane passed away, his family wanted to carry out his legacy of helping other veterans. That is what inspired us to start a therapy program.”

The Paws of War Therapy Program will train rescued dogs to become the best therapy dogs they can be before visiting any facilities that help veterans. Therapy dogs’ responsibilities include:

  • Provide psychological or physiological therapy to individuals other than their handlers/owners
  • Maintain stable temperaments and friendly, easy-going personalities
  • Visit various institutions like hospitals, schools, hospices, psychotherapy offices, nursing homes and more

Many veterans at medical facilities also miss the love and companionship of their own family pets while they are away from home. Bringing in canine therapy does wonders for them. The animals draw out even the most isolated personality, and having to praise the animals helps traumatized veterans overcome emotional numbness.

We anticipate getting many dogs and veterans involved with this program so that we can continue our work of helping both ends of the leash,” states Scofield. “We are both honored to provide this service in Duane’s memory and to expand our work with canines and veterans through our Paws of War program.”

Paws of War is an all volunteer organization that provides assistance to military members with their pets, and provides service and therapy dogs to veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. To learn more, get involved, or to make a donation to support Paws of War please visit the website: www.pawsofwar.org.

About Paws of War

Based in New York and founded by Guardians of Rescue, Paws of War is a 501c3 organization devoted to helping both animals and veterans. The Paws of War goal is to train and place shelter dogs to serve and provide independence to our United States military veterans that suffer from the emotional effects of war such as PTSD. In turn each veteran can experience the therapeutic and unconditional love only a companion animal can bring. To learn more about Paws of War, visit the site at www.pawsofwar.org.

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SMITHTOWN, NY – (June 26, 2013) – According to the National Center for PTSD, women are more likely than men to develop post-traumatic stress disorder, (PTSD) and about 10% of women develop PTSD sometime in their lives compared with 5% of men. Sabrina Lacey and her daughter Daja are military veterans who both suffer from PTSD. Through their “Paws of War” program, animal rescue group, Guardians of Rescue, is stepping in to help.

Guardians of Rescue’s Paws of War program helps place trained rescue dogs with veterans suffering from PTSD. Back in March, the animal rescue group rescued all of the dogs from the Ft. Bragg Animal Shelter & Adoption Center, located on Ft. Bragg, home of more than 56,000 Soldiers. One of them was a pit bull mix named Tank. After months of training, Tank will finally meet his new owner, Daja Lacey, this Friday, June 28, the day after National PTSD Awareness Day. Sabrina Lacey will also be receiving a dog on this date. Both Daja and her mother Sabrina are military veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Sabrina is a post-commander of her local VFW and a retired disabled veteran.

PTSD is a condition among military veterans. It is a psychological condition that can arise after someone has experienced a traumatic event, such as being directly involved in combat. It is estimated that around 400,000 veterans currently suffer from PTSD. Animal therapy has proven to be beneficial in helping veterans overcome the condition. PTSD, according to the National Institutes of Health, changes the body’s response to stress. Some of its symptoms include flashbacks, upsetting dreams, feeling emotionally numb, hopelessness, memory problems, and avoiding doing things that were once enjoyed.

“PTSD is a real disorder that affects thousands of veterans, both active and inactive, across the country,” says Daja Lacey. “We are very thankful to Guardians of Rescue for rescuing Tank and many others, and now Tank will help to rescue me,” she adds.

“We work hard to rescue these dogs and it’s very rewarding when it all comes together, and we finally get to pair them up with military veterans in need,” says Robert Misseri, president and founder of Guardians of Rescue. “We believe that heroes deserve heroes.”

Guardians of Rescue is a non-profit organization aimed at Animals Helping People and People Helping Animals. They provide food, veterinary care, and shelter to animals in need. Guardians of Rescue founded Paws of War and Operation No Buddy Left behind programs to help active military and veterans with the use of therapy dogs to assist in post-traumatic stress disorder. To learn more or donate, visit www.guardiansofrescue.org.

About Guardians of Rescue

Based in New York, Guardians of Rescue is an organization whose mission is to protect the well being of all animals. They provide aid to animals in distress, including facilitating foster programs, rehabilitation, assisting other rescue groups, and providing support to families, both military and not, who need assistance due to economic factors. To learn more about Guardians of Rescue, visit the site at www.guardiansofrescue.org.

 

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SMITHTOWN, NEW YORK (February 5, 2013) – Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is something that many people are vaguely familiar with. Yet they may not know exactly what it is or what can be done about it. PTSD is a mental health condition that can occur after someone has gone through a traumatic event, such as a war; this makes it common among veterans. The more people understand this condition, the more likely they will seek to receive the help they need in order to overcome it.

“Veterans have served time protecting our country. Once they come home, it is our job to step up and help protect them,” explains Robert Misseri, president of Guardians of Rescue. “Many of our veterans are suffering from PTSD and need resources and help in order to help them improve their quality of life. We try to do our part in helping those veterans, and have been successful so far.”

Here are 5 things every veteran should know about PTSD:

  1. They are not alone. PTSD is common among veterans, so much so that it is estimated that around 400,000 of them currently experience it. The U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs reports that the average PTSD rate for all adults is 6.8 percent. Yet for veterans it ranges from 12-31 percent, depending on their service. For example, the PTSD rate for those who served in Vietnam is 31 percent, while those who served in Iraq and Afghanistan is 14 percent.
  2. It changes people. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), PTSD changes the body’s response to stress. It does this by affecting the stress hormones and chemicals that carry information between the nerves. This creates an anxiety in people, one that comes with a range of side effects.
  3. They may have the symptoms. Some veterans may not recognize that they have PTSD, yet they may have some of the symptoms. Those symptoms include reliving the event, nightmares, emotional numbing, avoidance, being easily startled, and feeling irritated, among others. Veterans who have these symptoms for more than a 30-day period should be evaluated to determine whether they have PTSD.
  4. There are three main categories. The NIH breaks down PTSD symptoms into three main categories, which include reliving the event, avoidance, and arousal (e.g., anxiety, being paranoid, etc.). Each of these tends to disturb their day-to-day activity and life. Another aspect is that veterans may feel guilt about the event, or for being one who has survived it when others didn’t.
  5. There is help. There is help for those who have PTSD. Such things as having a good social support system, attending a support group, and desensitization treatment can be helpful in preventing and addressing it. Animal therapy is another effective treatment method, which involves getting veterans around animals, such as getting them a dog.

The group is making plans to visit military bases and pick up dogs of those soldiers who need help taking care of them while they are serving abroad. This is instrumental so they don’t end up in high kill shelters and can be adopted out or placed in foster homes. They have recently made stops at Fort Stewart and are soon heading to Fort Bragg.

Guardians of Rescue has a program called “Animals Helping People,” where they pair shelter dogs up with veterans suffering from PTSD or other psychological conditions. Army Corporal John Wallace is part of this program to help the soldiers. He teamed up with the organization after they sent him his beloved “Tommy” after he returned from the war. Together, they have helped transport 10 dogs from Afghanistan to the United States and have reunited them with the U.S. soldiers that cared for them during combat.

“Many times, soldiers rely on the dogs they find as their eyes and ears,” explains John Wallace. “But when the troops finally leave, the animals are just left to fend for themselves, and often become targeted. Reuniting these soldiers with the dogs they had while deployed is therapeutic.”

Guardians of Rescue provides assistance to animals out on the streets, helping to rescue them, provide medical care, food and shelter, and find foster home placement. Many families are still struggling to recover from the storm, making it difficult to care for their pet, either financially or while living in temporary housing. To learn more, or to make a donation to support the Guardians of Rescue, log onto www.guardiansofrescue.org.

About Guardians of Rescue

Based in New York, Guardians of Rescue is an organization whose mission is to protect the well being of all animals. They provide aid to animals in distress, including facilitating foster programs, rehabilitation, assisting other rescue groups, and providing support to families, both military and not, who need assistance due to economic factors. To learn more about Guardians of Rescue, visit the site at www.guardiansofrescue.org.

 

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