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Talkin' Pets News

August, 15, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Devin Leech

Network Producer - Justin Rothman

Social Media / Consultant - Bob Page

Special Guests - Hour 1 Environmental Ed - 10 minute discussion of forest fires and the effect on plants,, animals and the future of life on earth...  Hour 2 - 10 minute discussion about Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show of 2021 with Jerry Grymek the doggie concierge of Hotel Penn in NYC

 

To many of us, pets are family — even if they’re covered in fur, feathers or scales. Animal companionship is a great stress reliever, especially during the social isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Naturally, the nearly 85 million households in the U.S. that own pets want to live places where their beloved companions can enjoy long, healthy lives without breaking the bank. The American Pet Products Association projects that in 2020, pet ownership will cost Americans $99 billion.

Years ago, pet owners had access to only a handful of businesses offering animal services and supplies. Petco and PetSmart were among the biggest names. But the market for pet businesses is growing to fill increasing consumer demand. For example, in 2019, the pet food industry reached a $97 billion global value. There are also new ways to buy goods for your animal, such as monthly subscription boxes.

But adding an animal to the family roster can be hard on the wallet. A long list of expenses that include licenses, grooming and medical care can cost from around $230 to more than $2,000 annually, depending on the type of animal. Health insurance alone can exceed $200 per year for a dog, and it may not even be worth it. And if you rent an apartment with an animal, you can expect to pay hundreds, if not thousands, more for a pet deposit, fee and rent.

With animal parents in mind, WalletHub compared the pet-friendliness of the 100 largest U.S. cities across 25 key metrics. Our data set ranges from minimum pet-care provider rate per visit to pet businesses per capita to walkability. Scroll down for the winners, pet advice from a panel of experts and a full description of our methodology.

Most Pet-Friendly Cities

Overall Rank*

City

Total Score

‘Pet Budget’ Rank

‘Pet Health & Wellness’
Rank

‘Outdoor Pet-Friendliness’ Rank

1

Tampa, FL

59.83

26

11

4

2

Austin, TX

59.61

19

2

73

3

Las Vegas, NV

59.19

32

17

1

4

Orlando, FL

58.78

45

4

24

5

Seattle, WA

57.35

46

9

8

6

St. Louis, MO

56.04

28

20

16

7

Atlanta, GA

55.93

30

12

35

8

New Orleans, LA

55.38

20

27

26

9

Birmingham, AL

55.32

36

22

18

10

San Diego, CA

55.10

76

1

34

11

Cincinnati, OH

54.80

18

41

19

12

Scottsdale, AZ

54.62

86

3

6

13

Boise, ID

54.59

31

52

3

14

Portland, OR

53.97

59

16

5

15

Lexington-Fayette, KY

53.62

8

34

68

16

Miami, FL

52.60

64

7

43

17

Nashville, TN

52.51

7

57

46

18

Houston, TX

52.18

13

29

89

19

Corpus Christi, TX

51.94

2

62

95

20

Oklahoma City, OK

51.79

15

66

33

21

Tulsa, OK

51.74

24

67

17

22

San Antonio, TX

51.67

10

43

76

23

Columbus, OH

51.43

3

82

52

24

Denver, CO

51.42

69

10

44

25

Raleigh, NC

51.35

40

15

80

26

St. Petersburg, FL

50.93

56

36

13

27

Phoenix, AZ

50.89

50

39

20

28

Pittsburgh, PA

50.78

42

47

27

29

Albuquerque, NM

50.52

25

78

15

30

Fort Wayne, IN

50.31

4

63

93

31

Colorado Springs, CO

50.20

51

37

31

32

Lincoln, NE

50.18

6

90

38

33

Fort Worth, TX

50.14

38

21

90

34

Plano, TX

49.70

84

5

50

35

Louisville, KY

49.52

16

54

81

36

Lubbock, TX

49.27

14

59

94

37

El Paso, TX

49.27

17

73

58

38

Omaha, NE

49.19

27

71

40

39

Tucson, AZ

49.16

52

33

54

40

Sacramento, CA

48.92

65

19

53

41

Chesapeake, VA

48.67

34

72

36

42

North Las Vegas, NV

48.48

47

75

10

43

Chicago, IL

48.46

89

6

49

44

Henderson, NV

48.15

47

77

12

45

Kansas City, MO

47.88

23

89

32

46

Winston-Salem, NC

47.62

11

79

92

47

Hialeah, FL

47.54

67

28

41

48

Memphis, TN

47.47

9

88

60

49

Philadelphia, PA

47.46

53

53

51

50

Virginia Beach, VA

47.28

43

49

79

51

Baton Rouge, LA

47.24

44

45

77

52

Los Angeles, CA

47.08

92

13

23

53

Indianapolis, IN

46.93

22

74

74

54

Wichita, KS

46.59

21

81

72

55

Durham, NC

46.49

1

76

97

56

Irvine, CA

46.46

99

8

21

57

Cleveland, OH

46.46

29

80

61

58

Garland, TX

46.39

57

42

87

59

Jersey City, NJ

46.31

81

24

29

60

Minneapolis, MN

46.21

68

56

22

61

New York, NY

46.17

98

18

11

62

Jacksonville, FL

45.73

58

61

48

63

Arlington, TX

45.55

66

32

75

64

San Jose, CA

45.51

41

70

56

65

Madison, WI

45.07

73

85

2

66

Reno, NV

45.05

54

58

62

67

Milwaukee, WI

45.01

12

98

28

68

Irving, TX

44.71

70

26

98

69

Glendale, AZ

44.58

63

51

70

70

Boston, MA

44.31

90

23

45

71

Anaheim, CA

44.21

74

46

59

72

St. Paul, MN

44.07

55

86

39

73

Washington, DC

44.06

96

38

9

74

Toledo, OH

43.83

35

92

47

75

Stockton, CA

43.58

39

87

82

76

Dallas, TX

43.45

85

25

64

77

Oakland, CA

43.21

95

31

37

78

Charlotte, NC

43.05

60

50

100

79

Greensboro, NC

43.04

33

83

71

80

San Francisco, CA

43.01

100

14

14

81

Chandler, AZ

42.94

62

64

78

82

Norfolk, VA

42.72

49

91

55

82

Gilbert, AZ

42.72

79

35

86

84

Riverside, CA

42.39

72

65

65

85

Long Beach, CA

41.71

94

44

42

86

Anchorage, AK

41.05

77

94

7

87

Fremont, CA

41.02

93

60

25

88

Aurora, CO

40.72

78

48

91

89

Detroit, MI

40.63

37

97

67

90

Baltimore, MD

40.00

75

84

57

91

Newark, NJ

39.97

91

30

99

92

Chula Vista, CA

39.93

87

55

69

93

Mesa, AZ

39.37

79

68

83

94

Buffalo, NY

37.95

61

95

85

95

Laredo, TX

37.64

5

100

88

96

Bakersfield, CA

37.32

88

69

66

97

Honolulu, HI

37.28

71

99

30

98

Santa Ana, CA

36.93

97

40

96

99

San Bernardino, CA

36.56

82

93

63

100

Fresno, CA

33.65

82

96

84

*No. 1 = Most Pet-Friendly

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AS A PROFESSIONAL, you carefully screen potential clients and conduct a thorough initial consultation to ensure you have all of the information you need and that the pet-sitting assignment is a good fit for you and the client.

While mutual trust is vital in the pet sitter-pet parent relationship, at some point you’ll encounter pet owners who lie, or at least omit the truth. So, what are some things pet sitters have discovered pet owners being less than honest about?

Pets’ behavior. While they likely have no bad intentions, some pet owners are not forthcoming about their pet’s behavior. Without an accurate understanding of a pet’s behavior, you are unable to provide them with the best care and you may also be putting yourself at risk. Often, you can ensure you receive more accurate information by asking more specific questions. For example, don’t simply ask, “Is your dog aggressive?” Instead ask specific questions, such as if the dog has ever bitten another person or pet.

You’ll also want to know how they react to the owner’s absence and how they react in other situations. Again, refrain from general questions and instead focus on specifics (e.g. Does your cat have any specific hiding places? Does your dog pull on the leash when you are walking her?).

Others who have access to the home. Job sharing and pet sitting when others have access to the home are often hot topics in the pet-sitting community. While some have no issue with job sharing or pet sitting in a home where house cleaners, adult children or even neighbors will be coming and going, many do not want to assume the liability that results from these situations — and often turn down these assignments. However, we often hear from members who don’t discover others have access to the home until they are already in the middle of the pet-sitting assignment.

How you respond to job sharing and/or others having access to the home (whether you know in advance or find out when the assignment is already in progress) will be a business decision you should make in advance — and this is a policy you should make your clients aware of upfront.

Departure and return dates. Have you ever arrived at an assignment and had the distinct feeling that the clients didn’t actually leave the night before (or that morning) as they indicated they would when they booked your services? Instead, the cat’s overflowing litter box and empty food and water bowl make you feel as if the client tried to skirt around your every-day-cat-visit policy by lying about when they’d actually be leaving town? It’s unfortunate — but it happens! As a professional pet sitter, your most effective way to combat this is to be proactive: Be clear in your policy regarding every-day visits and educate clients on why it’s so important for even pets they consider “low maintenance” to be visited at least once every 24 hours.

If you are worried about clients who may not be returning when they say they will, your business policies can go a long way in preventing this. Most pet sitters have a policy that clients must contact them (by call or text) when they return home. Accidents and delays happen, so this is a great policy to ensure that pets do not go without care because the client is unexpectedly unable to return home. This is also a great way to combat a client who may be less than honest on when they plan to return home. -----------------------------------------------------------------

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The hottest cold case in town just got a fresh financial offering for intel.

The family of Don Lewis, the first husband of “Tiger King” star Carole Baskin, is offering a $100,000 reward for information on his disappearance over two decades ago.

Lewis’ disappearance got fresh attention following Netflix’s wildly popular true-crime docuseries, which prompted local law enforcement to seek new leads, confirm and deny old details and buoy hordes of fans in their accusations against Big Cat Rescue owner Baskin.

“We really need someone to come forward in the case with information,” Jack Smith, a family spokesperson, said Monday alongside lawyers and three of Lewis’ daughters. “And there’s a lot of people out there that have information but they’re scared to come forward. There’s people with animals — exotic animals — that are scared if they come forward, they’re gonna lose their animals somehow.”

The new reward comes a week before the 23-year anniversary of Lewis’ disappearance from his Tampa, Florida, home on Aug. 18, 1997. The family has also invested in billboards advertising the reward not far from Baskin’s Big Cat Rescue animal sanctuary.

After “weeks of interviewing attorneys,” the family has chosen to work with Tampa-based John Phillips, of Phillips and Hunt Law Firm, said Lewis’ oldest daughter, Donna Pettis.

Lewis’ youngest daughter, Gale Rathbone, commented on the massive renewed public interest in her father’s case following the popularity of “Tiger King.”

“Amazingly, our little family tragedy has become your tragedy. Our search for closure and truth has become your mission also,” she said Monday. “We all know by now that he was not a perfect man. But do only the perfect among us deserve justice?”

Despite her father being a complicated man, her last 23 years have been haunted by his absence.

“I still to this day miss my dad, I love my dad,” said Rathbone. “For 23 years, I’ve gone to bed every night knowing the only chance I have of seeing him again is in my dreams. For 23 years, I’ve woken every morning to the heartbreak of his strange disappearance.”

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Recent reporting indicates that, this week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency poised to sign two rules that would eliminate and weaken key safeguards designed to reduce methane pollution from the oil and gas industry — moves that could result in an additional 5 million metric tons of methane pollution released into the atmosphere each year.

“Our federal methane safeguards have been in place since 2016, protecting Americans from unhealthy and climate-damaging pollution. The Trump administration’s decision to reverse course is deeply and fundamentally flawed,” said EDF lead attorney Peter Zalzal. “Eliminating these safeguards would ignore the overwhelming body of scientific evidence documenting the urgent need to reduce methane pollution. And it is also starkly at odds with the broad and diverse set of stakeholders — including some major oil and gas producing companies — that support retaining and strengthening methane safeguards.”

One rule that Trump’s EPA is expected to sign this week would likely totally eliminate federal regulation of heat-trapping methane emissions from oil and gas well sites nationwide. It would also remove standards for all air pollution from oil and gas transmission and storage facilities. This action would seek to prevent any future regulation of methane pollution from oil and gas facilities built before 2015.

EDF analysis shows that 9.3 million people live within half a mile of one of the older wells that the Trump administration’s action would seek to leave forever unregulated by the EPA. The overwhelming majority of these people are groups who are much more susceptible to the health impacts of polluted air (children and adults over 65) or have historically borne an oversized burden of local air pollution (Black, Indigenous, people of color, and people living below the poverty line).

A second rule that Trump’s EPA is expected to sign would likely dramatically weaken the remaining standards, including by weakening requirements for lower-producing oil and natural gas wells to find and fix leaks.

Methane is more than 80 times more potent than carbon dioxide in the first two decades after its release. Because methane is so potent, and because we have solutions that reduce emissions, addressing methane is the fastest, most effective way to slow the rate of global warming now. Extensive, peer reviewed scientific study found the U.S. oil and gas industry emits over 13 million metric tons of methane pollution every year — 60% more than EPA estimates suggest.

In light of this scientific imperative and lack of federal protections, major oil and gas producing states such as Colorado and California have moved forward with standards to curb methane pollution. Pennsylvania, where reporting suggests the EPA administrator may sign these damaging rollbacks, is in the process of finalizing rules to address the more than one million tons of methane emissions the state’s oil and gas industry emits annually. New Mexico is also currently https://www.edf.org/media/new-mexico-agencies-take-big-step-toward-urgently-needed-methane-regulation&sa=U&ved=2ahUKEwiVuuDGp5HrAhVIV80KHY_YDO4QFjABegQIBRAC&usg=AOvVaw0NxoXz_hKiT5NlS7PtTUfn">moving forward with rulemakings to address state methane pollution.

Shell, BP, and ExxonMobil support federal rules for methane and even asked EPA to extend them to existing sources. Producers such as Pioneer and Jonah Energy have also publicly voiced opposition to these rollbacks. As BP wrote, companies should realize federal rules keep methane pollution across the whole industry in check and “voluntary actions by several energy companies are not enough to solve the problem.”

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A woman has been formally charged in animal cruelty after authorities connected her to cat hoarding situations, involving more than 210 cats living in two separate homes. Diane Pitone, 44, was arraigned Thursday afternoon. She’s been charged with one felony count of animal cruelty, involving more than 25 animals.

Earlier this month, authorities removed more than 150 cats from the Park Township house, north of Three Rivers, Michigan. Park Township officials said the cats taken from the home ranged from newborns to adults. Two of them needed to be euthanized immediately and several others appeared to have health issues. The house was in deplorable condition and deemed unsafe for humans, according to the township.

On Wednesday, authorities say more than 60 cats were removed from a home in Three Rivers. The second home belongs to Pitone’s boyfriend, who told police all, but a few cats belong to her. Additional traps were set out in the second home to catch cats that were more feral and wouldn’t approach rescuers.

Rachel Legus, the code enforcement and animal control officer for the Three Rivers Police Department, says a tip led them to the home where the number of cats discovered during a search kept increasing. “The majority of them were stray feral cats that were picked up off the street that she brought in and left there with him,” Legus said.

St. Joseph County Environmental Health Director Paul Andriacchi says the home has been condemned until it is cleaned and reinspected because of the conditions inside.

“All the hard surface flooring throughout was covered in cat urine, cat feces. The smell was just overwhelming. I was wearing a mask and it really didn’t do anything to even cut down on that smell. Dirty cat litter boxes, just cats everywhere,” Andriacchi said.

Animal control officers say they appreciate the donations and support they have received but acknowledge the challenges of caring for so many animals. “We are struggling out there at animal control. We don’t have the means or the funds to house that many cats,” Legus said.

The charge Pitone was arraigned on Thursday was specific for the Park Township case. She has not been charged in the hoarding situation at the Three Rivers home.

Township officials said a family member of the suspect was also being investigated for hoarding cats. It is unclear at this time if Pitone’s boyfriend is being investigated.

Donations of cat food, kitty litter, bleach, laundry soap, larger size metal collapsible cages and other items are being accepted for drop off at the St. Joseph County animal control shelter gate. Monetary donations can be made to the shelter through the United Way of St. Joseph County. Donors can designate their money to care specifically for the cats at the shelter.

Ex-Jacksonville Jaguars linebacker Telvin Smith is facing more legal trouble after several citations for animal neglect. The 29-year-old Florida State University standout racked up 7 civil citations after a Jacksonville Animal Care and Protective Services inspector said he left his dogs unattended and illegally tethered in his yard. He is also accused of not registering his three animals. In total, the fines amount to more than $3,000.

It’s the latest issue for Smith, who was arrested in April on accusations of having an inappropriate relationship with a teenage girl. Smith bonded out of jail hours after his arrest and pleaded not guilty to the charges. In new documents discovered by the News4Jax I-TEAM, an ACPS officer claims to have found Smith’s dogs outside and illegally tied up at his property in Queen’s Harbour.

The I-TEAM obtained seven civil citations total. In one, an officer noted that a dog was “improperly tethered on the fence with no shelter, tangled and unable to reach water.” The inspector wrote that the tethers weren’t long enough to be safe and that there was “no owner present.” It was classified as animal neglect. According to Jacksonville’s ordinance: a tether must allow an animal to move at least 10 feet in all directions, they must be able to reach shelter and have access to sufficient food and water.

Inspectors wrote Smith his first violations on July 10. When they returned 6 days later, they found the same problems. Each citation comes with a $505 fine. The documents note that Smith refused to sign the tickets. A police officer was also there as a witness. News4Jax has requested the evidence photos and case reports from the city. The request is pending.

“Dogs can’t sweat so it’s really difficult for them to cool off unless they have direct access to water or shade,” said veterinarian Chase McCall, who works at San Pablo Animal Hospital. “If the dog is chained up, they can kind of panic or pace when they get hot and that can lead to choking.” McCall is not involved in Smith’s case but wants pet owners to be careful.

“If a dog’s temperature gets over 107 degrees, can cause G.I. issues, kidney issues, seizures, and in some cases, deaths,” he said. “And I also worry about them getting too anxious or worked up to the point where they could potentially choke or strangle themselves.”

The Jaguars fined Smith more than $88,000 for missing the team’s mandatory three-day minicamp in June. Smith avoided future fines by filing retirement paperwork with the NFL before training camp.

Jacksonville placed him on the league’s reserve/retired list, which paused his contract and freed up a roster spot as well as $9.75 million in salary cap space in 2019. It also protected Smith from fines and NFL testing policies.

Smith has three years remaining on his current deal, which averages $10 million annually in base salary. Smith has a mandatory court appearance for the animal neglect cases later this month on Aug. 26.  Smith has not spoken publicly about this case or any allegations against him.

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A bald eagle took down a government drone in Michigan, state officials said.

The bird of prey attacked the Phantom 4 Pro Advanced quodcopter drone about 162 feet in the sky on July 21, "tearing off a propeller and sending the aircraft to the bottom of Lake Michigan," according to the state Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.

"The attack could have been a territorial squabble with the electronic foe, or just a hungry eagle," the department said.

An environmental quality analyst and drone pilot, Hunter King, was mapping shoreline erosion on Lake Michigan with the device, which was flying at 22 mph, when it began twirling out of control and he spotted an eagle flying away, it said.

A bird-watching couple that was nearby said it saw the eagle strike something and appear to fly away uninjured, department officials said.

A search for the drone days later was unsuccessful. The device was 150 feet offshore, in about 4 feet of Lake Michigan water, the department said.

A state drone coordinator, Authur Ostaszewski, used a kayak and snorkeling gear in his unfruitful search, state officials said.

The $950 drone is obsolete and will be replaced with a newer model, the department said.

Bird strikes aren't unusual for drones. The Federal Aviation Administration has studied the issue in depth, including analyzing impacts using simulated birds.

Technology publication 3D Insider last year published a guild for amateur drone operators about how to avoid bird strikes.

The Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy said one idea it's exploring is using coverings for the devices that would make them look less like seagulls.

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After a 400-year wait, sharp teeth are once again gnawing through trees and building dams on English waterways. Hunted to extinction in the 16th century, wild beavers are making a comeback after a five-year study demonstrated their positive impact on the environment. Local landowners had expressed concern that they could spread disease — but the U.K. government announced Thursday that the trial had been deemed a success and the beavers can stay.

The rodents are believed to have been living on the River Otter in Devon, southwest England, since 2008 although who released them and why remains a mystery. The name of the river is a coincidence — no otters are known to live there.

“The River Otter beavers reintroduction trial has proved highly successful — improving biodiversity and water quality, mitigating flooding and making the local landscape more resilient to change,” said Rebecca Pow, U.K. environment minister.

After a video emerged in 2014 showing that the beavers had successfully bred, the U.K. government planned to remove them, but an alternative plan to study their impact was devised instead. The research from the University of Exeter — published in February this year — showed that beavers act as natural "engineers," improving the environment in ways that far outweigh the cost to a small number of landowners who opposed them.

By building dams and lodges, the beavers reduced the flooding risk to a village downstream — a heightened concern in western England after a spate of severe floods in recent years, which have been linked to climate change.

The beavers also helped improve water quality and created new wetlands that could lead to a biodiversity boom along the river. Paving the way for the possibility of further colonies of beavers across the country, Pow added that the government is “firmly committed to providing opportunities to reintroduce formerly native species, such as beavers, where the benefits for the environment, people and the economy are clear.”

Peter Burgess, Director of Conservation at Devon Wildlife Trust — one of the organizations involved in the trial — called the decision “ground-breaking.” “Beavers are nature’s engineers and have the unrivaled ability to breath new life into our rivers. Their benefits will be felt throughout our countryside, by wildlife and people,” he said.

Some landowners opposed the trial over fears that farming could be harmed by beavers altering the watercourse. The U.K. government pledged to reward rural landowners with a new rural subsidy scheme that will replace its European Union equivalent after the Brexit transition period concludes in January.

Eurasian Beavers are Europe’s largest native rodents but were hunted to extinction in the U.K. 400 years ago after being prized for their fur and castoreum, an oil secreted from their tail that is used in perfumes and was thought to contain medicinal properties. Beavers were also successfully reintroduced to Scotland in 2016 after a successful trial there marking the first time a previously extinct native species had been reintroduced to the country. -----------------------

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A teenager was mauled to death by a shark off the south east coast of Australia, police said. It is the second fatal shark attack off the country's shores in a week.

The 15-year-old boy, whose name was not disclosed, was surfing at Wooli Beach, near Grafton, around 370 miles north of Sydney, when the creature struck shortly before 2:30 p.m. local time (12:30 a.m ET), New South Wales police said in a statement.

"Witnesses have told police a shark attacked the teenager while he was surfing," the statement said.

"Several board-riders came to his assistance before the injured teen could be helped to shore," it said, adding that first aid was rendered for serious injuries to his legs.

Despite CPR efforts to revive him, the teenager died at the scene. Beaches in the surrounding area had been closed.

Last Saturday, a 20-year-old scuba diver who was spear-fishing died after they were attacked by one of the creatures off the coast of Australia's Queensland state.

A 57-year-old diver was also killed off Western Australia state in January, and a 60-year-old surfer was killed off Kingscliff in New South Wales state in June.

New South Wales police said officers and local authorities would start an investigation and report into the teenager's death.

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Earlier this week, President Iván Duque Márquez of Colombia signed an important bill into law ending the use of animals in cosmetics testing throughout the country. As a result, beginning in 2024, the legislation will prohibit the use of animals for testing cosmetics products and their ingredients, regardless if they were imported or manufactured in Colombia. With many multinational companies based in Colombia and serving the Latin American market, the measure will also impact Chile, Mexico, and Peru. “This humane and historic new law will spare the suffering of countless animals in needless cosmetics tests,” Jan Creamer, President of Animal Defenders International (ADI) noted.

ADI Colombia provided research and testimony in support of the bill that was introduced in 2018, and worked with the author of the bill, Congress member Juan Carlos Losada, to advance the legislation. The bill is also supported by the Government of Colombia, National Association of Businessmen, and all 14 political parties.

“With the approval of this law, Colombia advanced as a country towards community development free of animal exploitation. This decision was made in one of the most crucial moments for humanity and in which the planet is giving us an opportunity to change and to respect any kind of life. It is time to discard any product manufactured at the cost of animal suffering, to advance the protocols and the ways we investigate, and to be on par with world leaders in scientific innovation,” stated Senate co-author Richard Aguilar.

Nearly 40 countries have ended the use of animals in cosmetics tests, including the UK, which is the first country to introduce a ban in 1998, as well as India, Israel, New Zealand, and the 27 countries of the European Union. In the United States, The Humane Cosmetics Act is before Congress and seeks to phase out animal testing for cosmetics, as well as the sale of animal-tested products.

“Seven years ago, we achieved the ban on the use of wild animals in circuses, which was a great challenge because animal protection was not part of the agenda in the Colombian Congress. Now, we have achieved another historic advancement, the use of animals in laboratories has never been discussed in Congress and the Government is finally beginning to pay attention to this important issue,” shared ADI Colombia Campaigns Manager, Yani Mateus. “We hope that Colombia and Latin America continue to advance in favor of respect for all forms of life.”

Cosmetics tests on animals include repeated, toxic doses of products to observe long-term poisonous effects. The animals may be forced to inhale products, or have them pumped down their throats, or applied to their skin. Skin sensitization tests involve painful damage to the animals’ skin in order to test products. ADI investigations have exposed extreme suffering in cosmetics testing, including rabbits restrained in stocks while products are dripped into their eyes, and guinea pigs suffering raw and inflamed skin lesions. Such tests are unnecessary and unreliable. Advanced scientific methods are now available, which avoid the problem of differences between species in their reaction to substances, producing misleading results. Advanced technology produces results relevant to humans.

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Animal activists from around the world are mourning the death of hundreds of whales and dolphins after the Faroe Islands’ horrific whale hunting “tradition” continued last month.

Many had hoped for this year’s whaling season to be cancelled due to the pandemic, but sadly, it was given the go ahead by fishing ministry Jacob Vestergaard on July 7th.

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Fishermen used vessels to herd the whales and dolphins into the bay off Hvalba, a village on the island of Suduroy, where 252 long-finned pilot whales and 35 Atlantic White-sided dolphins were brutally killed with spears.

Sea Shepherd has long condemned this “barbarous practice,” while demanding an end to the Faroe Islands’ outdated whale hunting season.

Every year, up to 1,000 migrating pilot whales and other dolphins are hunted and brutally killed in the Danish protectorate of the Faroe Islands. Sea Shepherd has led opposition to the grindadráp since the 1980s, saving the lives of hundreds of pilot whales and bringing global attention to the ongoing slaughters.

A total of 28 Sea Shepherd volunteers have been arrested for interfering against the grindadráp, many of whom were subsequently deported for the “crime” of defending pilot whales.

Although Sea Shepherd was able to successfully disrupt the whale hunting season in 2014, the organization was hit with legislation that allowed Danish military to keep the NGO outside Faroese waters.

That home where the buffalo roam ain't as tranquil as it sounds in the song ... just ask the woman who got dragged around like a rodeo clown!!!

The wild incident went down at Custer State Park in South Dakota and you see the bison flinging a poor woman around like a rag doll ... with her belt hooked around one of the animal's horns.

The Custer County Sheriff says the victim, a 54-year-old woman from Iowa, was airlifted to a hospital ... but when it was all said and done, she avoided any serious, long term injuries.

Witnesses say the woman had gotten off her motorcycle and approached a bison calf when an adult bison came charging, catching her belt and jeans on its horn.

Authorities say the woman was apparently saved because her pants came off. She fell to the ground unconscious, and the bison ran off with the rest of the herd.

The Sheriff is emphasizing what most people should already know ... stay in your vehicles and keep a safe distance from all bison.

Read 80 times Last modified on Saturday, 15 August 2020 17:00
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