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The first Nebraska mountain lion to be trophy hunted in 2020 was killed on January 2, 2020. The hunter killed the 1½ year old male just south of Chadron and posed, smiling while holding the dead animal on social media. 

Nebraska is home to an estimated 40 independent-age mountain lions (59 including kittens who are not legally trophy hunted). In 2019 and 2020 the annual quota is eight lions total. In other words, Nebraska Game and Parks allows 20% of this population to be killed by trophy hunters. The agency began allowing trophy hunting of mountain lions in 2019. 

Jocelyn Nickerson, Nebraska State Director for the Humane Society of the United States just released this statement:

 

“The Humane Society of the United States is committed to ending the unnecessary killing of mountain lions. Each year, thousands of these beautiful animals are hunted for trophies in the U.S. including in Nebraska and South Dakota where their populations are exceedingly diminishing. The loss of one mountain lion has an enormous, devastating ripple effect throughout their sensitive communities as well as their ecosystems.

Nebraska is home to a small population of these rare and iconic native animals. The trophy hunting of mountain lions is inhumane and losing just one here can be harmful to their long-term survival in our state. It can also result in greater conflicts among themselves as well as with humans, pets and livestock. These animals must be protected from trophy hunting so that they may continue to re-establish themselves in Nebraska and provide countless benefits to other wildlife and our state’s beautiful wild spaces.”

Since 2014, Senator Ernie Chambers has introduced bills to prohibit the trophy hunting of mountain lions. That year, the bill was approved by the legislature but vetoed by then Gov. Dave Heineman. Since then, Senator Chambers’ legislation has not passed committee.

 

 

New York, NYTo celebrate the dogs who do extraordinary things in the service of humankind, the AKC Humane FundSM is seeking YOUR nominations for its AKC Humane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence (ACE). Nominations are open now through July 31st and winners will be announced in the fall of 2020.  

Each year, the AKC Humane Fund pays tribute to five dedicated, hardworking dogs for making significant contributions to an individual or entire community. Since its creation in 2000, 100 ACE awards have been presented. Former ACE recipients have included a Poodle who helps his young autistic owner gain confidence each day and a Doberman Pinscher, who dedicates his life to Search & Rescue despite his own battle with Wobbler’s disease, among dozens of other extraordinary dogs.


“There are so many remarkable dogs to recognize with these awards,” said Doug Ljungren, President of the AKC Humane Fund. “Canines touch the lives and hearts of their owners and the world around them each day. We are proud to honor five of them each year with an ACE Award in recognition of their contributions.”

One award is given in each of the following five categories:

Uniformed Service K-9

Eligibility: Full-time working K-9s in the realms of city, county, state, or federal law enforcement; the military; firefighting; customs and border patrol; emergency services.

Exemplary Companion

Eligibility: Dogs without formal training or certification that have nonetheless distinguished themselves in some way and have made a meaningful contribution to their owners or communities.

 

Search and Rescue

Eligibility: Dogs certified to assist in wilderness and urban tracking, natural disasters, mass casualty events and locating missing people.

Therapy

Eligibility: Certified therapy dogs working in hospitals, schools, disaster sites, war zones, and wherever else the affection of a good dog can provide comfort.

Service

Eligibility: Service dogs who enrich the lives of physically or mentally disabled owners, including, but not limited to, guide dogs for the blind, seizure-alert dogs, hearing dogs, balance dogs.

**(Note: Nominees doing therapy work without certification are considered in the Exemplary Companion category.)

Honorees will receive an engraved sterling-silver medallion and an all-expenses-paid trip for dog and owner to Orlando, Florida, to be honored at the AKC National Championship presented by Royal Canin in December. A donation of $1,000 will also be made in each recipient’s name to the pet-related charity of their choice.

Anyone, including the dog’s owner or handler, may submit a nomination form.

Submissions for the AKC Humane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence for 2020 must include:

  • A digital photograph of the dog. Files must be larger than1MB in size and a minimum of 300 dpi. The photo should feature solely the nominated dog.
  • A 500-word-or-less description of how the dog has demonstrated excellence.
  • Dog’s call name, breed, age and sex.
  • Owner’s/Nominator's name(s), address and phone number. E-mail address if available.

Nominations will be accepted through July 31, 2020 and should be submitted here, with a photo sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

For more information about the ACE awards or to nominate a dog, visit the AKC Humane Fund Awards For Canine Excellence (ACE) page.

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The AKC Humane FundSM promotes responsible pet ownership through education, outreach and grant-making. Through its programs, the AKC Humane Fund supports Parent Club Rescue activities; assists shelters for domestic abuse victims that permit pets and provides resources for responsible dog ownership education. Contributions to the AKC Humane Fund are fully tax deductible as allowed by law under Section 501(c)(3) of the IRS Code.

 

The American Kennel Club, founded in 1884, is a not-for-profit organization which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

To become a fan of the AKC on Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com/americankennelclub. To follow the AKC on Twitter, go to http://www.twitter.com/akcdoglovers.

 

The Guidelines and accompanying Client Brochure provide a guide to veterinary practitioners in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of these common infectious diseases in cats

[HILLSBOROUGH, NJ – January 2020] On Thursday, January 9, the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) will release updated Feline Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines to the veterinary community, which will be published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. In publishing these Guidelines, the AAFP aims to provide the most current information about feline retrovirus infections to veterinary practitioners so they may optimize the care and management of their feline patients. In addition, the Client Brochure provides cat caregivers with information regarding transmission, testing, prevalence, and precautions. These Guidelines focus on feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infections, which are found in cats worldwide. The spread of these viruses can be minimized through education, testing, and vaccinations.

The updated Guidelines represent a consensus of current information compiled by an international panel of researchers and practitioners, and is an update of the AAFP’s heavily referenced 2008 Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines.
 
“Education and early testing can greatly assist in the treatment and management of feline retrovirus infections. Routine veterinary care, when cats are well and when they are sick, can lead to better care and decrease the spread of infection. We are pleased to present these Guidelines to support both veterinary professionals and cat caregivers in the management of these illnesses. We further stress the partnership between veterinarians and cat owners in caring for infected cats because with regular healthcare and reduced stress, cats infected with retroviruses, especially FIV, may live many healthy years,” said Heather O’Steen, CEO, AAFP.
 
“The 2020 Feline Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines contain much new information about feline leukemia and feline immunodeficiency virus infections. The Guidelines were written by an international panel of experts and included not only retrovirus researchers, but veterinarians working in private practice and in shelters. We hope these Guidelines will be of practical use for all veterinarians. The panel is especially proud to have endorsement of the Guidelines by the International Society of Feline Medicine,” said Retrovirus Guidelines Co-Chair Susan Little, DVM, DABVP (Feline).
 
Julie Levy, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DABVP (Shelter Medicine) added, “These guidelines address rapidly evolving knowledge about how testing results, clinical expression, and prognosis for FeLV may change over time relative to the cat’s current immune response and resulting levels of virus in circulation, how quantitative testing may be used to better inform clinical decision-making, and an emerging trend in which screening for FeLV and FIV is increasingly shifting from animal shelters, where cats are adopted, to veterinary practices, where animals receive comprehensive care.”
 
 
 
More About Retroviruses:
These Guidelines and Client Brochure represent current knowledge on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of retrovirus infections in cats. Infections with FeLV and FIV are associated with a variety of clinical signs and can impact quality of life and longevity. Although vaccines are available for FeLV in many countries and for FIV in some countries, identification of infected cats remains an important factor for preventing new infections. The retrovirus status of every cat at risk of infection should be known. Cats should be tested as soon as possible after they are acquired, following exposure to an infected cat or a cat of unknown infection status, prior to vaccination against FeLV or FIV, and whenever clinical illness occurs. It might not be possible to determine a cat’s infection status based on testing at a single point in time; repeat testing using different methods could be required. Although FeLV and FIV infections can be associated with clinical disease, some infected cats, especially those infected with FIV, can live for many years with good quality of life. There is a paucity of data evaluating treatments for infected cats, especially antiretroviral and immunomodulatory drugs. Management of infected cats is focused on effective preventive health care strategies and prompt identification and treatment of illness, as well as limiting spread of infection. 
 

Prevalence and the Spread of Retroviruses in Cats:
FIV: Feline immunodeficiency virus is more commonly found in male cats and cats that fight with other cats. It is found less often in kittens and neutered adult cats. The virus is spread primarily through saliva and is usually passed to other cats by bite wounds. In North America, about 3 to 5% of tested cats are found to be infected with FIV.
 
FeLV: Feline leukemia virus infection is more commonly spread from mother to kittens. The virus can also be spread between cats that live together or those that fight. It is mainly spread in saliva during grooming and when food and water bowls are shared. The virus is less often spread through urine, feces, or nasal discharge. In North America, 4% of tested cats are found to be infected with the virus.
 
 
Prevention:
There are no vaccines marketed in the United States or Canada that can protect cats from FIV infection.
 
Vaccines to protect cats from FeLV infection are available. The vaccine is recommended for all kittens, again one year later, and for cats that have ongoing risk of infection. Adult indoor-only cats living alone or with uninfected cats may not need to be vaccinated after the first two years. Veterinarians will help assess an individual cat’s vaccination needs.
 
To access the Feline Retrovirus Guidelines, visit catvets.com/retroviruses. Cat caregivers can learn more about feline retroviruses at catfriendly.com/felv and catfriendly.com/fiv.


Retrovirus Guidelines Press Preview


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Saturday, 04 January 2020 17:05

Talkin' Pets News

 

Talkin' Pets News

January 4, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Maria Ryan - DogGone Positive

Producer - Lexi Lapp Adams

Reporter - Dan Adams

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Saturday, 28 December 2019 17:58

Talkin' Pets News

Talkin' Pets News

December 28, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Linda Register - East West Animal Hospital

Producer - Daisey Charlotte

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guest - Jerry Grymek - Doggie Concierge - Hotel Penn NYC at 621pm ET

Tuesday, 24 December 2019 18:31

Little Women

Movie review written by Jon Patch with 4 out of 4 paws

Little Women

Columbia Pictures, New Regency Pictures and Pascal Pictures present a PG, Drama, Romance film directed and written by Greta Gerwig and novel by Louisa May Alcott with a theater release date of December 25, 2019.

Tuesday, 24 December 2019 18:12

The Song of Names

Movie review written by Jon Patch with 3.5 out of 4 paws

The Song of Names

Sony Pictures Classics, Serendipity Point Films, Lyla Films, Feel Films, Film House Germany and Proton Cinema present a PG-13, 113 minute, Drama, directed by Francois Girard, screenplay by Jeffrey Caine and based on the novel by Norman Lebrecht with a theater release date of December 25, 2019.

Thursday, 19 December 2019 00:00

Cats

Movie review written by Jon Patch with 2 out of 4 paws

Cats

Universal Pictures, Working Title Films, Amblin Entertainment, Perfect World Pictures, Monumental Pictures and The Really Useful Group present a PG, 110 minute, Comedy, Drama, Family film directed by Tom Hooper, screenplay by Hall and poetry collection “Old Possum’s Books of Practical Cats” by T.S. Eliot with a theater release date of December 20, 2019.

Saturday, 14 December 2019 00:00

Talkin' Pets News

Talkin' Pets News

December 12, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Zach Budin

Network Producer - Darien Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests - HOW TO TEACH PHILOSOPHY TO YOUR DOG author Anthony McGowan will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 12/14/19 at 5pm ET to discuss and give away his book

Listen today to win mugs, shirts, muffs and more from the upcoming movie "Cats" opening on Christmas

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