Displaying items by tag: show dogs

This week we are diving into all of our videos with Boxers. Learn what makes a Boxer a Boxer, see 2020 judging and more.
Best of Breed Minute
 
Get to know the Boxer with Gail Miller Bisher in our Westminster Kennel Club Best of Breed Minute.
Boxers at the 2020 WKC Dog Show
 
Watch over 40 Boxers compete for Best of Breed at the 144th annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.
From the Road to WKC
 
Professional Handler and long time Boxer breeder, Wendy Bettis won Best Junior Handler at the WKC Dog Show in 1986. She has some valuable advice for any up and coming Junior Handler looking to be involved in Dog Shows. 
From The WKC Archives
 
Meet Biff, a Boxer, and the winner of the 1994 Working Group at the WKC Dog Show. In "Life Stories: Profiles from The New Yorker," Biff was described as "...very, very personable. He has a je ne sais quoi that's really special."
That Group One Feeling
 
 Professional Handler Diego Garcia and his Boxer, Devlin, won the Working Group at the 141st Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Find out why winning the group at the WKC Dog Show was so special to Diego. 
Want more videos?
Check out the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show Youtube Channel.
WESTMINSTER. There's Only One. ®
To see and learn more go to: westminsterkennelclub.org
This week we are diving into all of our videos with Golden Retrievers. Learn what makes a Golden Retriever a Golden Retriever, see 2020 judging and more.
Best of Breed Minute
 
Get to know the Golden Retriever with Gail Miller Bisher in our Westminster Kennel Club Best of Breed Minute.
Golden Retrievers at the 2020 WKC Dog Show
 
Watch over 40 Golden Retrievers compete for Best of Breed at the 144th annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.
Daniel Makes a Special Visit
 
After his Sporting Group victory at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, Daniel made a special visit to Betty at the nursing home.
From The WKC Archives
 
It was a Golden moment when Andy (Ch. Chuckanut Party Favour O Novel) was chosen to be the WKC Sporting Group Winner in 2006.
A Golden Win at the Masters Obedience Championship
 
Meet the Runner-Up at the Masters Obedience Championship in 2017. Peggy McConnell traveled from Dallas, Texas all the way to New York City to compete in the 2017 Masters Obedience Championship.
WESTMINSTER. There's Only One. ®
To see and learn more go to: westminsterkennelclub.org
RETIRED NAVAL OFFICER TO DECIDE
BEST IN SHOW AT THE
144th ANNUAL WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW
 
Robert “Bob” Slay Tops Judging Panel at America’s Dog Show
 
 
New York, NY — Mr. Robert H. Slay of Cary, North Carolina has been given the most prestigious judging assignment in the sport of purebred dogs — deciding who will be the Best in Show winner at the 144th Annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden. Mr. Slay brings extensive experience and dog knowledge to the sport. Anchoring Westminster Week this iconic annual dog show has been held continuously in New York City since 1877.
Mr. Slay grew up in Southeastern Mississippi where his family owned a working farm and he gained respect and appreciation for several types of hunting dogs. Although he has owned several different breeds, he loved, bred and handled champion German Shepherd Dogs for many years. In 1964, while stationed in Charleston, South Carolina as an ensign in the United States Navy, he purchased his first German Shepherd Dog. She easily achieved her American Kennel Club championship and Mr. Slay was forever hooked on the sport. He was married to the late Jane Vassar “Candye” Slay and has one son and two grandchildren. 
 
Mr. Slay is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi and the United States Naval Officers Candidate School. He served five years on active duty afterwards obtaining the rank of Commander in the Naval Reserves. In addition, he also attended the Yale University School of Executive Management Leadership Program. He has always been active in his community. Mr. Slay was elected to public office for three terms serving as chairman of one of the largest public-school systems in South Carolina. He chaired a United States Department of Energy Advisory Board for five years and served several years as the South Carolina State Chairman of the Morris Animal Foundation. He was also a member of the original steering committee for the AKC Museum of the Dog. In 1983, the North Carolina governor awarded his highest honor to Mr. Slay by inducting him into the Order of the Long Leaf Pine Society for service to his state and community.
 
Employed by the American Kennel Club for 18 years, Mr. Slay served as an Executive Field Representative and later as a Vice-President. While at the AKC he was responsible for the development and implementation of AKC's first DNA programs in support of registration and pedigrees. He retired from AKC in 2004 to resume his judging career. Mr. Slay has served as president and show chairman for several all-breed and specialty dog clubs. He was first approved to judge in 1979 and has judged extensively throughout the United States and overseas.
 
Mr. Slay judged the Westminster Herding Group in 2009 and the Working Group in 2018.This will be his eighth judging assignment at Westminster. 
 
Seven Group Judges will select their picks for the Best in Show competition over two nights at Madison Square Garden.
 
On Monday, Feb. 10, 2020 the following judges will select the group winners to advance to the Best in Show competition. Ms. Marjorie Martorella of Millstone Township, New Jersey for the Hound Group; Mrs. Doris Cozart of Denton, Texas for the Toy Group; Mr. Allen L. Odom of Denver, Colorado for the Non-Sporting Group; and Mrs. Shirley D. Limoges of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada for the Herding Group.
 
On Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020 the following judges will select the remaining three group winners to advance to Best in Show. Ms. Theresa L. Hundt of Sandy Hook, Connecticut for the Sporting Group; Mr. Jay Richardson of Elgin, Illinois for the Working Group; and Mr. Norman B. Kenney of Cross Roads, Texas for the Terrier Group.
 
The Best Junior Handler award will be decided on Tuesday, Feb. 11 by Junior Showmanship Finals Judge Mrs. Valerie Nunes-Atkinson of Temecula, California. This will be the 87th year the finals will be held at Madison Square Garden. The eight junior showmanship finalists will be determined in preliminary rounds by judges Mrs. Sioux Forsyth-Green of Pinehurst, South Carolina and Mrs. Marianne “Tuni” Conti of Oxford, Connecticut.
 
The 7th Annual Masters Agility Championship at Westminster on Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020 will be judged by Ms. Sue Barnett of Avon, Connecticut and Ms. Lavonda L. Herring of LaGrangeville, New York. Mr. John D. Landis of Hellertown, Pennsylvania will officiate for the 5th Annual Masters Obedience Championship at Westminster.
 
All Westminster Week events are presented by Purina Pro Plan®.
 
Pending American Kennel Club approval, the judging panel for the Best of Breed or Variety competitions includes:
 
SPORTING BREEDS (33)
 
Mr. Kenneth E. Berg of Moraga, CA: Brittanys, German Wirehaired Pointers, Flat-Coated Retrievers, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers, Spinoni Italiani, Wirehaired Pointing Griffons.    
 
Mr. Edd E. Bivin of Fort Worth, TX: English Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels.
 
Mr. Michael Faulkner of Center Cross, VA: Nederlandse Kooikerhondjes, American Water Spaniels, Boykin Spaniels, Clumber Spaniels, Cocker Spaniels (all Varieties), Field Spaniels, Irish Water Spaniels.
 
Mrs. Souix Forsyth-Green of Pinehurst, NC: Pointers, German Shorthaired Pointers,
 
Ms. Sydney LeBlanc Good of Sarasota, FL: English Setters, Irish Setters, Vizslas, Weimaraners, Wirehaired Vizslas.
 
Mrs. Linda Hurlebaus of Palmetto, GA: Gordon Setters, Irish Red and White Setters, Sussex Spaniels, Welsh Springer Spaniels.
 
Mr. Sergio Scarpellini of Gazzaniga, Italy: Lagotti Romagnoli, Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Curly-Coated Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers.
 
HOUND BREEDS (35)
 
Mrs. Gretchen Bernardi of Edwardsville, IL: Borzois, Greyhounds, Ibizan Hounds, Irish Wolfhounds, Salukis, Scottish Deerhounds.
 
Mr. Edmund Dziuk of Columbia, MO: Basenjis, Basset Hounds, Beagles (both Varieties), Dachshunds (all Varieties).
 
Ms. Sydney LeBlanc Good of Sarasota, FL: Whippets.
 
Mrs. Linda Hurlebaus of Palmetto, GA: Grand Basset Griffon Vendéens, Harriers, Norwegian Elkhounds, Otterhounds, Petit Basset Griffon Vendéens, Pharaoh Hounds, Portuguese Podengo Pequenos.
 
Dr. Eric Liebes of Peyton, CO: American English Coonhounds, American Foxhounds, Black and Tan Coonhounds, Bloodhounds, Bluetick Coonhounds, English Foxhounds, Plotts, Redbone Coonhounds, Sloughis, Treeing Walker Coonhounds.
 
Ms. Betty-Anne Stenmark of Grass Valley, CA: Afghan Hounds, Azawakhs, Cirnechi dell'Enta, Rhodesian Ridgebacks.
 
WORKING BREEDS (30)
 
Mrs. Eva E. Berg of Moraga, CA: Doberman Pinschers, Dogues de Bordeaux, German Pinschers, Great Danes, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs.
 
Mr. Edd E. Bivin of Fort Worth, TX: Boerboels, Bullmastiffs, Mastiffs, Rottweilers.
 
Mrs. Linda Hurlebaus of Palmetto, GA: Chinooks, Giant Schnauzers, Great Pyrenees, Newfoundlands, Tibetan Mastiffs.
 
Mr. Douglas A. Johnson of Bloomington, IN: Akitas, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Black Russian Terriers, Boxers, Komondorok, Kuvaszok, Neapolitan Mastiffs.
 
Dr. Eric Liebes of Peyton, CO: Alaskan Malamutes, Anatolian Shepherd Dogs, Cane Corsos.
 
Ms. Patti Widick Neale of Alachua, FL: Leonbergers, Portuguese Water Dogs, Saint Bernards, Samoyeds, Siberian Huskies, Standard Schnauzers.
 
TERRIER BREEDS (32)
 
Mr. Larry Adams of St. Louis, MO: Border Terriers, Cairn Terriers, Smooth Fox Terriers, Wire Fox Terriers, Miniature Schnauzers, Norfolk Terriers, Norwich Terriers, Scottish Terriers.
 
Mrs. Connie H. Clark of Rio Del Mar, CA: Glen of Imaal Terriers, Irish Terriers, Kerry Blue Terriers, Lakeland Terriers, Standard Manchester Terriers, Miniature Bull Terriers, Parson Russell Terriers.
 
Mr. John Constantine-Amodei of Jeffersonville, PA: Rat Terriers, Russell Terriers, Sealyham Terriers, Skye Terriers, Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers, Welsh Terriers, West Highland White Terriers.
 
Ms. Betty-Anne Stenmark of Grass Valley, CA: Airedale Terriers, American Hairless Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, Australian Terriers, Bedlington Terriers, Bull Terriers (both Varieties), Cesky Terriers, Dandie Dinmont Terriers.
 
TOY BREEDS (23)
 
Mr. Edd E. Bivin of Fort Worth, TX: Brussels Griffons, Chihuahuas (both Varieties), Papillons, Silky Terriers, Yorkshire Terriers.
 
Mrs. Connie H. Clark of Rio Del Mar, CA: Affenpinschers, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, English Toy Spaniels (both Varieties), Japanese Chin, Toy Manchester Terriers.
 
Mr. John Constantine-Amodei of Jeffersonville, PA: Havanese, Maltese, Pekingese, Pomeranians, Shih Tzu, Toy Fox Terriers.
 
Ms. Sydney LeBlanc Good of Sarasota, FL: Chinese Cresteds, Italian Greyhounds, Miniature Pinschers.
 
Mr. Elliott B. Weiss of Novelty, OH: Pugs, Toy Poodles.
 
NON-SPORTING BREEDS (21)
 
Mrs. Eva E. Berg of Moraga, CA: Dalmatians, Keeshonden, Lhasa Apsos, Lowchen, Norwegian Lundehunds, Schipperkes, Shiba Inu, Tibetan Spaniels, Tibetan Terriers.
 
Mrs. Linda Hurlebaus of Palmetto, GA: American Eskimo Dogs, Bichon Frises, Boston Terriers.
 
Mr. Douglas A. Johnson of Bloomington, IN: Bulldogs, Chinese Shar-Pei, Chow Chows, Cotons de Tulear, Finnish Spitz, French Bulldogs, Xoloitzcuintlis.
 
Mr. Elliott B. Weiss of Novelty, OH: Miniature Poodles, Standard Poodles.
 
HERDING BREEDS (31)
 
Mr. Larry Adams of St. Louis, MO: Australian Shepherds, Bearded Collies, Cardigan Welsh Corgis, Pembroke Welsh Corgis, Polish Lowland Sheepdogs.
 
Mr. Michael Faulkner of Center Cross, VA: Australian Cattle Dogs, Border Collies, Canaan Dogs, Collies (both Varieties), German Shepherd Dogs, Icelandic Sheepdogs, Miniature American Shepherds, Norwegian Buhunds, Shetland Sheepdogs.
 
Dr. Eric Liebes of Peyton, CO: Beaucerons, Belgian Malinois, Belgian Sheepdogs, Belgian Tervuren, Bergamasco Sheepdogs, Berger Picards.
 
Ms. Patti Widick Neale of Alachua, FL: Entlebucher Mountain Dogs, Finnish Lapphunds, Pumik, Pyrenean Shepherds, Spanish Water Dogs, Swedish Vallhunds.
 
Mr. Elliott B. Weiss of Novelty, OH: Bouvier des Flanders, Briards, Old English Sheepdogs, Pulik.
 
 
 
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About The Westminster Kennel Club – The Westminster Kennel Club is America's oldest organization dedicated to the sport of purebred dogs. Established in 1877, Westminster's influence has been felt for more than a century through its famous all-breed, benched dog show held every year in New York City. Today 205 breeds and varieties of dogs compete in Best of Breed judging with the winners advancing to the Group and Best in Show competitions at Madison Square Garden. America’s dog show has expanded into Westminster Week which includes the Masters Agility Championship at Westminster and the Masters Obedience Championship at Westminster. Nearly 3,000 dogs entered from around the world compete in these events, making Westminster Week like no other. Westminster. There’s only one. (R) Follow us @WKCDOGS or visit: westminsterkennelclub.org.
 

 
 

 
 
More Information
 
For more information please visit our website.
WESTMINSTER There's Only One®

 

Iconic dog show host and award-winning author receives highest honor

(New York, NY – December 6, 2017) – The Dog Writers Association of America (DWAA) has selected David Frei as the 2017 Hall of Fame Inductee for outstanding contributions to the field. He will accept the award on February 10, 2018 at the DWAA Awards Banquet at the Hotel New Yorker in Manhattan.

“I am truly humbled by this honor given to me by my peers and colleagues and friends,” Frei said. “To be a part of this collection of great and talented people who are already inductees is truly special. I know that I share with them the great fortune of having wonderful dogs making my life better every single day. I thank the Dog Writers Association of America for including me.”

Being inducted into the DWAA Hall of Fame is the latest of Frei’s many career accomplishments. New York Magazine once called David Frei "probably the most famous human in the world of canines.”

As the co-host of NBC’s National Dog Show Presented by Purina since its inception in 2002, David is seen every Thanksgiving Day by the largest TV audience for any dog show – more than 25 million viewers in 2017. It is the same role that he perfected in 27 years as the longtime (1990-2016) co-host of USA Network’s Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. He has now added to his duties with NBC/USA as co-host of the Beverly Hills Dog Show, which debuted on Easter in 2017.

Being America’s “dog guy” has brought him many appearances on network television, including "Today," “NBC Nightly News,” "Good Morning America," "Fox & Friends," "The View”, Martha Stewart," and more. The dogs have taken him to the White House for a visit with the President, for a ride on a float in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, to ring the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange, to throw out the first pitch at two Major League Baseball games, to a role on HBO’s “Sex And The City” and even to an appearance as a pastry judge on the Food Network’s “Best In Show” competition.

A breeder-owner-handler and judge in the world of purebred dogs for more than 40 years, he has enjoyed much competitive success with his Afghan Hounds, Brittanys and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. His dog, Ch. Stormhill’s Who’s Zoomin’ Who, was the top Afghan Hound in the country in 1989 and retired as the top-winning female in the history of the breed. As a judge, he has officiated at shows in the U.S., Canada, Australia, Denmark and China. 

But David’s true passion comes from the work that his dogs have been doing as therapy dogs at places such as the Ronald McDonald House and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York (where his Brittanys, Teigh and Belle, were the first therapy dogs ever allowed into these facilities), and at New York’s VA Medical Center. After Teigh and Belle passed, David’s Cavalier, Angel, and his Brittany, Grace, took over for them at many New York facilities.

While at Westminster, he created a charitable activity, Angel On A Leash, to support a therapy dog program at New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital. Angel On A Leash later became an independent charity with him as founder and president, creating and advocating for therapy dog programs many places, expanding nationwide and receiving many honors for its wonderful accomplishments.

David’s second book, Angel On A Leash (named after the charity), is his view of his world of therapy dogs and his life in dogs, and was the 2012 winner of a Dog Writers Association of America’s Maxwell Award as best depiction of the human-animal bond. David was also the co-author, with Mike Lingenfelter, of The Angel By My Side in 2002. Also a DWAA Maxwell winner, it tells the story of Dakota, Mike’s heroic Golden Retriever service dog. David’s third book, about his years at Westminster, is underway.

He also served as director of communications for Westminster from 2003 to 2015, during which time he was recognized with awards from the DWAA (its AKC Distinguished Service Award), the World Dog Press Association, the Association of Purebred Dog Writers (the Stonehenge Award), and Purina (Better with Pets Award).   

Petside.com named him as the Pet Person of the Year in 2011, and in 2015, Dog Fancy magazine, in its final issue, included him in a retrospective, “45 People Who Changed the Dog World.”

He has been honored for his work with Angel On A Leash by the American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club, the ASPCA, the Pet Philanthropy Circle and a number of other organizations. He is a past board member for Take The Lead and Morris Animal Foundation, and a past member of the St. Jude Children’s Hospital Sports Council. He has also been recognized for his volunteer efforts with Transfiguration Church and School in New York’s Chinatown for many years.

A native of Eugene, Oregon, David lived in Seattle for 20 years where he owned two popular sports bar restaurants and his own PR agency. He then moved to New York City in 2002, working fulltime for the Westminster Kennel Club before moving to Cannon Beach, Oregon, in 2016, and now works as a consultant for NBC Sports. Previously, he held public relations positions with the Denver Broncos, San Francisco 49ers and ABC-TV Sports in New York. 

“David Frei is such an inspiration to the dog-writing community,” said Jen Reeder, DWAA’s president. “He is beloved not just by writers, but by dog lovers across the country and world. We’re thrilled to recognize him with our organization’s highest honor, which he so richly deserves.”

For more information, visit: dogwriters.org.

About DWAA

The Dog Writers Association of America is the most recognized professional writing association devoted to dogs. Founded in 1935, the DWAA has grown from eight founders to over 500 members, including journalists, authors, bloggers, publicists, photographers, illustrators and media personalities. Under the umbrella of the human-canine bond, members cover dog competitions, health, training, rescue, pet fashion, veterinary research, working dog organizations, animal welfare legislation, fundraisers and many other topics. For more information, visit: dogwriters.org.


 
Students and Alumni Now Eligible to Submit New Works
 
New York, N.Y. - The Westminster Kennel Club has partnered with Pratt Institute for its annual art contest. The contest participants will be current students and alumni. The winning artist will receive $10,000 and the five finalists $1,000.
 
Pratt Institute, founded in 1887, has a mission to educate artists and creative professionals to be responsible contributors to society. The Westminster Kennel Club, founded in 1884, also shares with Pratt a long history of excellence in its field, and promoting responsibility among dog owners. These two organizations based in New York City for more than a century look forward to promoting canines in art together.
 
Pratt Institute is a global leader in higher education dedicated to preparing 4,700 undergraduate and graduate students for successful careers through its academic schools of art, design, architecture, information, and liberal arts and sciences. Pratt boasts a historic 25-acre campus in the Clinton Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn, a campus located in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, and an extension campus in Utica, New York (Pratt MWP College of Art and Design). Its esteemed faculty of accomplished professionals and scholars challenge talented students to transform their passion into meaningful expression and contribute to society as leaders in their fields.
 
The winning artwork and five finalists' pieces will become the commemorative poster, Official Program cover and notecards for the 142nd Annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show held from Feb. 12 - 13, 2018. For 2018, a donation of $15,000 will be disbursed equally between three national breed clubs for dog rescue efforts. The donation will assist the clubs by offsetting rescue-related expenses such as transportation, veterinary care, grooming, boarding, feeding, and training. The three selected clubs will receive their check in a presentation at Madison Square Garden during the event. 
 
 
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About The Westminster Kennel Club - The Westminster Kennel Club is America's oldest organization dedicated to the sport of purebred dogs.  Established in 1877, Westminster's influence has been felt for more than a century through its famous all-Breed, benched dog show held every year at New York City's Madison Square Garden. Today, America's dog show has expanded into Westminster Week which includes the Masters Agility Championship at Westminster and the Masters Obedience Championship at Westminster, both held at Piers 92/94. More than 3,000 dogs from the US and abroad make Westminster Week like no other. Westminster. There's only one. Visit us at: www.westminsterkennelclub.org or follow @WKCDOGS.
 
About Pratt Institute - Pratt Institute is a global leader in higher education, preparing 4,700 undergraduate and graduate students for successful careers in art, design, architecture, information and digital innovation, and liberal arts and sciences. Founded in 1887, Pratt is a living laboratory of creativity with a historic, 25-acre campus in Brooklyn, as well as a signature building in Manhattan. Our esteemed faculty of accomplished professionals and scholars challenge talented students to transform their passion into meaningful expression and contribute to society as leaders in their fields. For more information, visit http://www.pratt.edu/news
 
 
WESTMINSTER. There's Only One.

Gail Miller Bisher is the director of communications for the Westminster Kennel Club.

Bisher has been a media professional for many years and has had life-long involvement in canine sport, getting her start in the sport in Junior Showmanship, where she once won second place at Westminster. She is an AKC-licensed conformation judge and a Canine Good Citizen evaluator.

"As the new ‘face' of the Westminster Kennel Club, I look forward to continuing a legacy of quality and prestige while increasing our brand’s presence and audience size," she said.

"It’s an honor to return to the Westminster in this capacity. It’s an exciting time of transition for this historic organization and I plan to do as any dog handler does: access, improve where needed, and practice teamwork. I believe in the leadership’s vision and I’m eager to start executing it."

To learn more, visit the Westminster Kennel Club website.

 

In 1876, the members of the Westminster Club, then primarily a shooting organization, commissioned one of its early officials, George deForest Grant, to send to England for a Pointer which the members could use for breeding purposes.

He received a photograph of a dog named Don which had won his bench championship in England, through show triumphs at Shifnal, Oswestry, Birmingham, Swansea and Llanelly in 1875, and at Newport and Carmarthen in 1876. Impressed with the pictures of the dog as much as with his show record, the members arranged to import him under the name of “Sensation,” Volume IV of the English Kennel Club Stud Book listing him as “Sensation (formerly Don).”

Sensation

Brought to this country, “Sensation” was promptly registered in the name of the Westminster Kennel Club in Volume I of the stud book of the National American Kennel Club, which subsequently became the American Kennel Club. His entry in that book as Number 1261 shows that he gained his American championship with victories at Baltimore in 1876 and at St. Louis, Boston and Baltimore in 1879. His show career, however, was limited since the primary object in his importation was to strengthen the breeding stock of the club’s members.

A handsome lemon and white dog, with a fine head and especially good body, “Sensation” did much for Pointer breeders in this country. Several artists did pictures of him and one of the head studies appeared on the Westminster catalog in 1878, the second all-breed show given by the club. Except for a gap between 1896 and 1903, “Sensation’s” head appeared on all subsequent catalogues of the Westminster Show through 1935.

In 1935, a steel engraving of “Sensation” was discovered in the collection of prints, engravings and paintings of the well-known sportsman, Harry D. Kirkover, of Camden, South Carolina and New York. He loaned the picture to the Westminster Club to permit its reproduction.

The engraving, by artist J. Wellstood, showed the whole dog, with a light lemon patch on its side, frozen in point. The artist had caught the magnificently bodied dog in marvelous detail. The muscles and even the veins of the legs stood out.

This became the new emblem of the club and appeared on the cover of the show catalog from 1936 through 1979. From 1980-1982, a head study of Sensation was selected once again for the cover, but in 1983 a foil embossed version of the full body engraving appeared on the cover and has been there ever since.

 

In 1877, New York was well on its way to becoming the world’s greatest city. This was the year that a group of sporting gentlemen decided that this would be a good time to hold a dog show in Manhattan. It didn’t take long before the Westminster Kennel Club, following the lead of its home town, would be on its way to becoming the world’s greatest dog show.

westmisterhotelWith its spectacular beginnings and extraordinary growth in the years to follow, the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show was quickly reflecting the growth and success of New York City. As the dog show grew every year, so did the Westminster Kennel Club’s position as the symbol of the purebred dog, with its influence being felt in show rings everywhere, and eventually in millions of television homes across the country. Westminster has become America’s Dog Show.

“Westminster gets its name from a long gone hotel in Manhattan. There, sporting gentlemen used to meet in the bar to drink and lie about their shooting accomplishments. Eventually they formed a club and bought a training area and kennel. They kept their dogs there and hired a trainer.

“They couldn’t agree on the name for their new club. But finally someone suggested that they name it after their favorite bar. The idea was unanimously selected, we imagine, with the hoisting of a dozen drinking arms.”
– Maxwell Riddle, from a newspaper story quoted in “The Dog Show, 125 Years of Westminster” by William Stifel

It was at one of those meetings that the members decided that they would stage a dog show so that they could compare their dogs in a setting away from the field. The First Annual New York Bench Show of Dogs, given under the auspices of the Westminster Kennel Club, was staged in 1877 at Gilmore’s Garden (the forerunner of Madison Square Garden) in New York City, drawing an entry of 1,201 dogs.

The show was such a hit that it was extended to four days from its originally-scheduled three, and drew this coverage from “Forest and Stream” magazine:

“To say that the dog show held in the city last week was a success would but poorly convey an idea of what the result really was. It was a magnificent triumph for the dogs and for the projectors of the show. We question if on any previous occasion has there ever assembled in this city such a number of people at one time, and representing as much of the culture, wealth and fashion of the town.”

rings1877To fully grasp the place in history of the Westminster Kennel Club and its famed annual dog show at Madison Square Garden, consider this:

Westminster pre-dates the invention of the light bulb, the automobile, and the zipper; the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Washington Monument; and manned air flight and the establishment of the World Series. Since Westminster held its first show 127 years ago, there have been 26 men elected president and 12 states have joined the union.

The dog show has outlasted three previous versions of Madison Square Garden, and is currently being staged in MSG IV. It is one of only four events to be held in all four “Gardens.”
The dog show has survived power outages, snowstorms, a national depression, two World Wars and a tugboat strike that threatened to shut down the city, in the process becoming the second longest continuously held sporting event in the country. Only the Kentucky Derby has been staged longer – but by just one year.

Westminster even pre-dates the establishment of the governing body of the sport, the American Kennel Club, by seven years. In fact, in 1877, members of Westminster and members of the Kennel Club of Philadelphia had together adopted a set of show rules and regulations and established a Board of Appeals to oversee these rules. This was the precursor of the American Kennel Club, which was finally created in 1884.

As one might imagine, the history of the club and its show is rich and colorful.

In the early Westminster years, some interesting names showed up in the catalogs. In the first show, there were two Staghounds listed as being from the late General George Custer’s pack, and two Deerhounds that had been bred by the Queen of England. In 1889, the Czar of Russia is listed as the breeder of a Siberian Wolfhound entered, and the following year, one of the entries is a Russian Wolfhound whose listed owner was the Emperor of Germany.

Philanthropist J. P. Morgan made the first of his many appearances at Westminster with his Collies in 1893. Famous American journalist Nelly Bly entered her Maltese at Westminster in 1894, some four years after she made a record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes, racing the record of Phineas Fogg in Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days.

warrenremedyThe most-coveted award in the dog show world, Best In Show at Westminster, was given for the first time in 1907. That year, and for the next two years as well, it went to a Smooth Fox Terrier bitch named Ch. Warren Remedy. She remains the only dog ever to win three times.

Six other dogs have won Best In Show twice, the most recent being the English Springer Spaniel, Ch. Chinoe’s Adamant James in 1971 and 1972.

Bash Dibra is a big, ebullient man with a warm smile, a gentle manner, and a lifelong affinity for dogs. When he was only three years old and fled with his family from Albania to a refugee camp in Yugoslavia, he made friends with the attack dogs that guarded the compound. Later, as the family traveled through Europe, Bash was able to work with master dog trainers, and he continued his work when he came to the United States. Then came the opportunity to raise and train a wolf, and through this experience Bash developed his unique methods of dog training.

Bash & Friends.jpgAs author of six best-selling books on responsible pet ownership, training and the proper treatment of animals in the entertainment industry, Bash Dibra sets the industry standard of service to celebrities and their pets as well as to pets who are celebrities in their own right. Mr. Dibra has trained the pets of countless celebrities, including Matthew Broderick, Sarah Jessica Parker, Kathleen Turner, Mariah Carey, Joan Rivers, Kim Bassinger and Alec Baldwin. His own pets are celebrities themselves, featured in motion pictures, television commercials and print ads.

Bash has appeared on countless TV shows promoting responsible pet ownership, and he works diligently behind the scenes for animal welfare and to promote animals in service to mankind. Bash credits his incredible way with dogs to his beloved wolf, Mariah, who taught him so much, and who was the official symbol of the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo.

In 1877, New York was well on its way to becoming the world’s greatest city. This was the year that a group of sporting gentlemen decided that this would be a good time to hold a dog show in Manhattan. It didn’t take long before the Westminster Kennel Club, following the lead of its home town, would be on its way to becoming the world’s greatest dog show.

westmisterhotelWith its spectacular beginnings and extraordinary growth in the years to follow, the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show was quickly reflecting the growth and success of New York City. As the dog show grew every year, so did the Westminster Kennel Club’s position as the symbol of the purebred dog, with its influence being felt in show rings everywhere, and eventually in millions of television homes across the country. Westminster has become America’s Dog Show.

“Westminster gets its name from a long gone hotel in Manhattan. There, sporting gentlemen used to meet in the bar to drink and lie about their shooting accomplishments. Eventually they formed a club and bought a training area and kennel. They kept their dogs there and hired a trainer.

“They couldn’t agree on the name for their new club. But finally someone suggested that they name it after their favorite bar. The idea was unanimously selected, we imagine, with the hoisting of a dozen drinking arms.”
– Maxwell Riddle, from a newspaper story quoted in “The Dog Show, 125 Years of Westminster” by William Stifel

It was at one of those meetings that the members decided that they would stage a dog show so that they could compare their dogs in a setting away from the field. The First Annual New York Bench Show of Dogs, given under the auspices of the Westminster Kennel Club, was staged in 1877 at Gilmore’s Garden (the forerunner of Madison Square Garden) in New York City, drawing an entry of 1,201 dogs.

The show was such a hit that it was extended to four days from its originally-scheduled three, and drew this coverage from “Forest and Stream” magazine:

“To say that the dog show held in the city last week was a success would but poorly convey an idea of what the result really was. It was a magnificent triumph for the dogs and for the projectors of the show. We question if on any previous occasion has there ever assembled in this city such a number of people at one time, and representing as much of the culture, wealth and fashion of the town.”

rings1877To fully grasp the place in history of the Westminster Kennel Club and its famed annual dog show at Madison Square Garden, consider this:

Westminster pre-dates the invention of the light bulb, the automobile, and the zipper; the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Washington Monument; and manned air flight and the establishment of the World Series. Since Westminster held its first show 127 years ago, there have been 26 men elected president and 12 states have joined the union.

The dog show has outlasted three previous versions of Madison Square Garden, and is currently being staged in MSG IV. It is one of only four events to be held in all four “Gardens.”
The dog show has survived power outages, snowstorms, a national depression, two World Wars and a tugboat strike that threatened to shut down the city, in the process becoming the second longest continuously held sporting event in the country. Only the Kentucky Derby has been staged longer – but by just one year.

Westminster even pre-dates the establishment of the governing body of the sport, the American Kennel Club, by seven years. In fact, in 1877, members of Westminster and members of the Kennel Club of Philadelphia had together adopted a set of show rules and regulations and established a Board of Appeals to oversee these rules. This was the precursor of the American Kennel Club, which was finally created in 1884.

As one might imagine, the history of the club and its show is rich and colorful.

In the early Westminster years, some interesting names showed up in the catalogs. In the first show, there were two Staghounds listed as being from the late General George Custer’s pack, and two Deerhounds that had been bred by the Queen of England. In 1889, the Czar of Russia is listed as the breeder of a Siberian Wolfhound entered, and the following year, one of the entries is a Russian Wolfhound whose listed owner was the Emperor of Germany.

Philanthropist J. P. Morgan made the first of his many appearances at Westminster with his Collies in 1893. Famous American journalist Nelly Bly entered her Maltese at Westminster in 1894, some four years after she made a record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes, racing the record of Phineas Fogg in Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days.

warrenremedyThe most-coveted award in the dog show world, Best In Show at Westminster, was given for the first time in 1907. That year, and for the next two years as well, it went to a Smooth Fox Terrier bitch named Ch. Warren Remedy. She remains the only dog ever to win three times.

Six other dogs have won Best In Show twice, the most recent being the English Springer Spaniel, Ch. Chinoe’s Adamant James in 1971 and 1972.

Bash Dibra is a big, ebullient man with a warm smile, a gentle manner, and a lifelong affinity for dogs. When he was only three years old and fled with his family from Albania to a refugee camp in Yugoslavia, he made friends with the attack dogs that guarded the compound. Later, as the family traveled through Europe, Bash was able to work with master dog trainers, and he continued his work when he came to the United States. Then came the opportunity to raise and train a wolf, and through this experience Bash developed his unique methods of dog training.

Bash & Friends.jpgAs author of six best-selling books on responsible pet ownership, training and the proper treatment of animals in the entertainment industry, Bash Dibra sets the industry standard of service to celebrities and their pets as well as to pets who are celebrities in their own right. Mr. Dibra has trained the pets of countless celebrities, including Matthew Broderick, Sarah Jessica Parker, Kathleen Turner, Mariah Carey, Joan Rivers, Kim Bassinger and Alec Baldwin. His own pets are celebrities themselves, featured in motion pictures, television commercials and print ads.

Bash has appeared on countless TV shows promoting responsible pet ownership, and he works diligently behind the scenes for animal welfare and to promote animals in service to mankind. Bash credits his incredible way with dogs to his beloved wolf, Mariah, who taught him so much, and who was the official symbol of the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo.

 

WWW.BASHDIBRA.COM

 

David Frei is well-known to millions of television viewers as the longtime co-host of USA Network’s annual telecast of the popular Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

David has co-hosted the live Westminster coverage from New York’s Madison Square Garden since 1990. In connection with that role, he has made many appearances on The Today Show, Good Morning America, The Early Show, Ellen, The View, Martha Stewart, Charlie Rose, and many more. His adventures with the Westminster Best In Show winners have taken him many places, including the White House and for a ride on a float in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. He has been director of communications for the Westminster Kennel Club since 2003.

David also has been co-host on NBC of The National Dog Show on Thanksgiving Day since its inception in 2002, a telecast seen by about 20 million viewers every year.

His new book, Angel On A Leash, about his work and observations in the world of therapy dogs and his life in dogs, was released in November 2011.

A longtime breeder-owner-handler and judge in the world of purebred dogs, he has judged all over the world, including the U.S., Canada, Australia, Denmark and China, and has also enjoyed much competitive success with his Afghan Hounds, Brittanys and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. His Ch. Stormhill’s Who’s Zoomin Who was the #1 Afghan in 1989 and retired as the top-winning female in the history of the breed.

But he is most proud of the wonderful work that his own dogs do as therapy dogs, regularly visiting patients and families at the Ronald McDonald House New York and at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. His Brittanys, Teigh and Belle, who have recently passed, pioneered the practice in many places, and his Cavalier, Angel, and Brittany, Grace, are carrying on for them today.

With Westminster, David helped to create Angel On A Leash, a charitable activity supporting a therapy dog program at the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian. Angel On A Leash has become an independent 501(c)(3) charity with David as president and CEO, and has expanded into a number of additional facilities across the country. The success of the program provided the inspiration for his new book of the same name.

David’s contributions to the world of dogs have been recognized by the Dog Writers Association of America in 2009 with its prestigious American Kennel Club Distinguished Service Award, and in 2010 by the World Dog Press Association with its Media Award.

He also does volunteer work with Transfiguration Church and School in New York’s Chinatown, and in 2006 was honored by the Transfiguration Education Association with a special award for “his loyal support of Transfiguration Schools and his dedication to philanthropic causes.” His work with Angel On A Leash and his own therapy dogs has been recognized by the American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club with its prestigious Patricia L. Kanan award, and by a number of other organizations as well.

He is a past board member for Take The Lead, a dog show world charity that provides for people with life-threatening and financially devastating illnesses and injuries. He is a past board member of the Morris Animal Foundation, a member of the St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital Sports Council, and a past president of the Afghan Hound Club of America.

David is the co-author, with Mike Lingenfelter, of The Angel By My Side, a critically-acclaimed best seller about a heroic service dog, published in 2002 (www.angelbymyside.com) and the winner of two DWAA awards as best book of the year.

In 2004, he appeared in one of the final episodes of the HBO hit series, Sex And The City, playing a smitten dog show judge awarding a big win to Charlotte and her Cavalier (mostly to Charlotte).

Previously, he held public relations positions with the Denver Broncos, San Francisco 49ers and ABC-TV Sports in New York. A native of Oregon, he owned two very unique and popular sports bar restaurants in the Seattle area, as well as his own public relations agency, before moving to New York City in 2002. His wife, Cherilyn, is a certified Catholic chaplain and Director of Spiritual Care and Family Support at The Ronald McDonald House of New York City.

Visit www.westminsterkennelclub.org for more information on the show ...

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