Displaying items by tag: risks

Cats and COVID-19

Information and resources for those concerned about their cats during the pandemic

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Keeping cats indoors is safer for cats, people, and wildlife. ABC has numerous resources to help pet owners transition their cats to full-time indoor living, including enrichment activities, literature, and more. Photo by Nikita Starichenko/Shutterstock

(Washington, D.C., April 10, 2020) As the COVID-19 pandemic tragically continues to threaten the lives and livelihoods of people across the globe, evidence is mounting that domestic cats and other felines may also be at risk of contracting the disease. Professional organizations and new research suggest keeping pet cats indoors to manage infection risks.

The British Veterinary Association (BVA) this week recommended that people who are self-isolating or have COVID-19 symptoms keep their cats indoors. According to BVA, it is possible that outdoor cats may carry the virus on their fur, just as the virus can live on other surfaces.

The American Veterinary Medical Association’s standing policy is that pet cats be kept indoors. Their policy states that “keeping owned cats confined, such as housing them in an enriched indoor environment, in an outdoor enclosure, or exercising leash-acclimated cats, can minimize the risks to the cats, wildlife, humans, and the environment.”

For people wanting to respond to these concerns by transitioning their cats from the outdoors to indoors, whether temporarily or permanently, American Bird Conservancy (ABC) offers a range of helpful solutions on its website that were developed over years of consultation with veterinarians and pet owners. 

New studies from researchers in China, where the virus was first identified, evaluated SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, to determine host susceptibilities and to better understand how the virus may move through the environment. These studies (Luan et al. 2020; Shi et al. 2020; Sun et al. preprint; Zhang et al. preprint), taken together, concluded that domestic cats are susceptible to infection, that infections have occurred both in experimental trials and outside the laboratory, and that infected domestic cats may transmit the virus to uninfected domestic cats.

Domestic cat infections have also been recently reported in Belgium and Hong Kong. Two Malayan Tigers, two Amur Tigers, and three Lions at the Bronx Zoo in New York have also shown symptoms of infection, and the only tiger to be tested came back positive for COVID-19. It’s suspected that people exposed these felines to the virus. So far, the disease does not appear to be fatal to cats, and there is no evidence that the disease has passed from cats to people.

“Keeping pet cats safely contained indoors, on a leash, or in a catio is always a great choice to protect cats, birds, and people,” said Grant Sizemore, Director of Invasive Species Programs at ABC. “At this point, it appears that keeping pet cats indoors is also the safer alternative to ensure the virus isn’t accidentally picked up or transferred by the cat.”

As well as being at risk from diseases, cars, and other threats, outdoor cats kill an estimated 2.4 billion wild birds each year in the U.S. alone.

Since 1997, ABC’s Cats Indoors program has supported responsible cat ownership that not only protects birds and other wildlife but also supports long, healthy lives for pet cats. Cat owners interested in bringing their cats indoors, or providing safe outdoor time for their pets, can find resources on the Cats Indoors website.

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American Bird Conservancy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation. Find us on abcbirds.orgFacebookInstagram, and Twitter (@ABCbirds).

This week the FDA recalled Nylabone Puppy Starter Kits warning that humans who touched the Nylabone Puppy Starter Kitdog chews are at risk of Salmonella infection if they did not thoroughly wash their hands and clean any surfaces that may have come in contact with the product.  Pets with Salmonella may be lethargic and have diarrhea, 

 

http://money.cnn.com/2015/04/27/news/dog-chew-recall/index.html

 
Leading Los Angeles Veterinarian  Dr. Patrick Mahaney is to discuss the story and give pet owners tips on what to do if they think their pet may have Salmonella. 
 

 

Dr. Patrick Mahaney – Industry’s Leading Veterinarian
Dr. Patrick Mahaney is Los Angeles’ premier, concierge, house-call veterinarian through his company  California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness (CPAW), Inc. He also provides holistic treatment for cancer patients at the  Veterinary Cancer Group.
Dr. Mahaney is a highly sought after certified veterinary journalist and shares his expert perspective on animal health and current events via  Animal Wellness, AOL’s  Paw NationHamptons PetThe Honest Kitchen Blog, PetMD’s  The Daily Vet, Pet360’s  Pet-Lebrity NewsPetSafePet World Insider, and Victoria Stilwell’s  Positively.com.   He co-hosts an internet radio show,  Holistic Vets on the Radio Pet Lady Network.
Dr. Mahaney makes television appearances, including Hallmark Channel’s  Home & Family, Bite Size TV’s  The Girl Spot, and is the go-to-holistic veterinarian for Animal Planet’s  My Cat From Hell.
He participates in public speaking engagements through  BlogPawsUCLA Extension, and  Western University of Health Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine.
Dr. Mahaney is a member of many professional advocacy groups, including the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), California Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA), International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS), and Lesbian Gay Veterinary Medical Association (LGVMA).