Displaying items by tag: pets

Felisept is a natural stress-reliever for cats of all breeds, colors, and sizes. Made with an extract of the mint plant we all know as "catnip", this plant is a natural attractant for cats and other feline species that helps create a sense of calm for them. When used in a cat's environment, Felisept can help curb their unwanted behavior that is often caused by feeling stressed. Felisept is available in two options to better suit your long-term or short-term needs. Try the fast-acting Felisept Spray to make travel and vet visits less troublesome for you and your cat, or plug in the long-lasting Felisept Diffuser to help your cat relax at home. Stress at home can be caused by many things for your cat, including: • Fireworks • Thunderstorms • New family members • Welcoming a new pet • Rearranged furniture • Animals outside in the yard

 

Stress can make us do crazy things, and it can affect our cats just as easily. While they don't have the same causes of stress we humans do such as work, money, and relationships, there are many other things in your cat's life and environment that can cause stress. How do you know if he's stressed? Luckily, cats show certain unusual behavior when something is bothering them, behavior that you might easily notice.

Here are 10 tell-tale behavioral signs from PetMD that your cat could be stressed out:

  1. Urinating Outside of the Litter Box
    If your cat is usually very good about keeping it in the box and you notice he's decided to urinate it other places around the house, he's probably trying to tell you something.
  2. Going Too Much, or Not Enough
    Diarrhea, constipation, and other digestive problems are not pleasant for you or your cat, and could be indicative of several possible things.
  3. Licking Til Fur is Gone
    Cats are known to groom themselves carefully and often, but no animal should lick to the point of bald patches or raw skin. This is a clear sign of stress, and should call for a trip to the vet instead of the groomer.
  4. Overly Scratching
    Too much scratching of himself can be just as bad as compulsive licking.
  5. Hiding From the Humans
    Cats are naturally aloof, but a cat that actively hides from you and everyone else in the house is likely hiding out of stress. Time to get him into a cat carrier and have a vet take a look.
  6. Talking More Than Ever
    Some cats are talkers, while others speak more rarely. If his meows are unusually long, panicked, or happening in recurring bouts, he's literally trying to tell you something. Your vet should be able to "crack the kitty language code".
  7. Eating Less or Not at All
    Humans may fast and go on diets, but cats are always going to be regular eaters--unless something is wrong. You'll want to see a vet very soon, especially if he stops eating entirely.
  8. Napping All Day & All Night
    They CAN sleep up to 20 hours per day, but that doesn't mean all cats will. No one knows your cat's sleeping schedule better than you. If you notice him suddenly sleeping more or being very lethargic, it could be stressed induced.
  9. Starting Fights with Other Pets
    They play rough, but real aggression between animals that are usually peaceful cohabitants of your home could be a sign that one of them is stressed or ill.
  10. Getting Aggressive with YOU
    Your favorite fluffy lap warmer decided to get aggressive with you? Try not to get personally offended. Stressed and sick animals may get suddenly aggressive with the humans they love, too. If this happens, it may be best to consult your vet quickly, before it gets out of hand.
NEW COOKBOOK FOR DOGS PROVES
THE HEALING POWER OF WHOLE FOODS

"Yin & Yang Nutrition for Dogs"
-A Natural Approach to Pet Health-

Home cooking for your dog may sound extravagant, but the key to good health is proper nutrition and pets are no exception. Canned, processed pet food has been directly linked to poor pet health and the truth is processed foods are just as bad for pets as they are for humans.Luckily, making food for your dog doesn’t have to be complicated or costly! In her new book,Yin & Yang Nutrition for Dogs,holistic veterinarian, Dr. Judy Morgan will show you easy, whole food recipes to keep your dog naturally healthy (and off medication.)
 

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Yin and Yang Book Pic.jpg

Yin & Yang Nutrition for Dogs: Maximizing Health With Whole Foods, Not Drugsis the ultimate health and wellness guide every dog owner needs to have.

This book details the importance of pet nutrition, and shows how to use food therapy to keep your dog naturally healthy. Author and holistic veterinarian, Dr. Judy Morgan has a passion for healing her patients with whole foods, minimizing medications and chemicals, allowing the body to heal from within. In this book she offers a variety of different menus options and easy-to-follow recipes that can be customized for your dog's specific health issues and even their personality type!

Visit:https://www.amazon.com/Yin-Yang-Dogs

 

WHY YOU NEED THIS BOOK:
 

While many pet owners like the idea of feeding their dogs a natural, whole foods diet, the logistics and cost of doing so can be overwhelming. This book is an easy-to-use and fun resource that proves cooking for your pet doesn't have to be costly or time consuming.Why should you prepare food for your pets? It’s simple. The pet food industry has let you down. Today it is widely known and accepted that diet and nutrition is linked to good health for humans but the vet industry has yet to catch up. Since the advent of processed food for pets, the pandemic of degenerative health problems has escalated in dogs and cats. People have depended on the pet food industry to provide wholesome nutrition to keep their pets healthy. Pet food labels often include words likeholistic, natural, andhuman grade; but in reality, ingredients are often waste products from the human food industry or rendered meals from diseased animal carcasses. The pet food industry has spent millions of advertising and teaching dollars to convince veterinarians and the pet-owning public that the only way to provide a complete diet is to feed processed industrial food....but the truth is, processed foods are just as bad for pets as they are for humans."If your dog is eating a prescription diet recommended by your veterinarian you are most likely paying a lot for a product that is not optimal for your pet,"says Judy Morgan, DVM, who operates two veterinary hospitals in New Jersey that offer an integrative approach to pet care combining holistic medicine with traditional western techniques.In this book, Dr. Morgan offers tips and interesting information on animal health and wellness that is useful for any pet owner. Dr. Morgan shows pet owners how to determine the right ingredients and quantities based on their pets’ health, condition, and behavior. The language is understandable without being over simplified and the book includes a wealth of photographs making the recipes easy-to-follow.

 
"Yin & Yang Nutrition for Dogs is a dog nutrition Bible for anyone who wants to keep their dog in peak condition. While there are a number of websites dedicated to whole and raw food canine diets, this is the most detailed and information-rich resource I’ve encountered."

-Jack Magnus, Amazon Reviewer

 

ABOUT DR. JUDY MORGAN:

Judy Morgan Head Shot.png

Dr. Judy Morgan is a nationally renowned author, speaker, and holistic veterinarian best known forhealing her patients with whole foods, minimizing medications and chemicals, allowing the body to heal from within.Dr. Morganhas received critical acclaim in the veterinary industry for integrating Eastern and Western medicine in her two award-winning veterinary practices in New Jersey.She is the author of three books on holistic pet care including the recently released titleYin & Yang, a holistic cookbook for dogs.  An active speaker and blogger, Morgan's social media sites reach millions of pet owners worldwide. Dr, Morgan is Chief Veterinary Medical Officer for Monkey's House Senior Dog Hospice and works with rescue groups for homeless dogs.

For More Information Visit: www.drjudymorgan.com

2018 is the Year of the Dog and National Geographic Kids Books is jumping in on the fun with all four paws with DOG DAYS OF HISTORY: The Incredible Story of Our Best Friends, by award-winning, New York Times best-selling author Sarah Albee. DOG DAYS OF HISTORY, is a complete story of man's best friend, from the first domesticated dogs, to the massive mastiffs that came over with Christopher Columbus on his voyage to the New World, to World War I hero dogs like Sergeant Stubby.  Sarah begins by exploring the origins of wolves and dogs and guides the reader through the changing role, looks and behavior of the pooches in the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the 17th, 18th and 19th and 20th centuries to the modern day. Fetching tales, fascinating history and original art and images combine to create a revealing and comprehensive title that examines the enduring friendship that exists with our four-footed friends. A great reference tool, the back matter is extensive andincludes a Biblidography, Ruffrences, other resources to dig up and dog-related museums to sniff out. 

A few treats from the book:

    Who domesticated the very first dogs?
    Why did George Washington send a small dog to a British general?
    When did Dalmatians become friends with firefighters?
    Which dog starred in 26 movies and had his own chef and chauffeur?The close relationship between humans and beloved canine companions spans more than 15,000 years. During this time dogs have guarded us, worked with us and marched off to war with us. They’ve saved our lives, kept us company and helped us with daily tasks.  Their story is our story. 

When Cara felt her teenaged children slipping away and saw an empty nest on the horizon, she decided the best way to fill that void was with dogs—lots of them—and so her foster journey began.

            In 2015, her Pennsylvania farm became a haven for Operation Paws for Homes and a whirlwind of incredible dogs. There were the nine puppies that arrived with less than a day’s notice; a heart-worm positive dog; a deeply traumatized stray pup from Iraq; shy boys and mischievous girls; and countless others who just needed a gentle touch and warm place to sleep. The dogs that entered Cara’s home were rescue dogs from high-kill shelters in the rural south and needed a foster family as a midway point on their journey while they waited for their forever home.

            With wit and humor, Another Good Dog reveals a saga that began on an impulse and led to an epiphany that there wasn’t just one dog that could fill the hole left in Cara’s heart—there were dozens! The stories of these remarkable dogs and the joy they bring to Cara and her family (along with a few chewed sofa cushions) fill the pages of this touching and inspiring new book that reveals the wonderful rewards of fostering.

            When asked how she can possibly say goodbye to that many lovable pups, Cara says, “If I don’t give this one away, I can’t possibly save another.”

“A big hearted, inspiring and passionate look at a critical piece of the rescue puzzle. Lucky are the dogs who pass through Cara Sue Achterberg’s arms on their way to the lives they so richly deserve. Honest and engaging.” —Peter Zheutlin, New York Times bestselling author of Rescue Road

“As expected, the narrative revolves around tales of dogs and puppies. What’s unexpected are Achterberg’s personal reveals. The stories and photos will delight.”—Publishers Weekly


“Heartwarming. Illustrated with photographs of some of Achterberg's many fosters, this book blends insight and entertainment to tell an unforgettable story about seeking, and finding, life purpose through caring for abandoned dogs. A compassionate and humane canine tale.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Achterberg has in fact written another good book about dogs, but even more so she has produced a manifesto on how to change the world: through single acts of caring and compassion stacked one on top of another without end.”—Jim Gorant, New York Times bestselling author of The Lost Dogs

Pegasus will publish on August 7, 2018. Cara lives in York County, Pennsylvania.

            Cara will be touring with her dog up and down the east coast, visiting the “rescue route” many of her dogs travel from high kill shelters as they make their way towards foster and forever homes as part of Operation Paws for Home, who will share in the proceeds from this book. Exact tour details forthcoming. I look forward to being in touch about this very special and heartwarming project!

 

Linda Blair WorldHeart Foundation | 10061 Riverside Dr. Suite 1003, Toluca Lake, CA 91506

 
 
We truly need your help! All of the shelters are overfilled and they are begging rescues and people to adopt the many dogs and cats before they start euthanizing. (You can read the article here: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/local/all-la-city-animal-shelters-at-capacity-hundreds-of-pets-may-be-euthanized/ar-BBLnCRZ?ocid=se)
 
We have done what we could here at LBWF. We have been pulling emergency dogs since Memorial Day. We know right now we are in an emergency crisis with the animals but so few people are listening as the Country is so devastated. Our hearts go out to everyone affected. If you are able, would you please, please, make a donation today to help us.
This upcoming Tuesday, August 7th, the electric company is turning off the electricity in our area for nine hours so they can fix the electrical grid. The temperature is supposed to reach 107 degrees. We are in shock they are doing this and we are asking for donations to help us rent generators so we can keep the dogs cool and comfortable. The only way we can provide this is by renting three generators to hook up the mini air conditioning units, purchasing 100 blocks of ice for the baby pools so the dogs can lie in the cool water, and regular bags of ice. The cost of renting a generator is $250 each.
Everyone in the area is affected and we know there are many that are not thinking ahead but we truly are as we care for our rescued animals with all our hearts! Please help! We are also on fire alert every single day. Our emergency funds are very low and down to nothing because of having to spay and neuter most all of our rescue dogs since the shelters won’t. Please help us to help the dogs in need. We have rescued so many and save so many lives because of your support! You can donate by clicking the link below and please put a message of support in the message bar!
With Love & Thanks,
Linda Blair
 
Below are pictures of our rescue dogs enjoying pool time and play time. Everything we provide is because of your support & donations! 
Our Recent Rescues
 
A Day In The Life of an LBWF Rescued Dog
Your support & donations make this possible!
 
Happy rescued dogs get the "zoomies!"
 
 

 

July 13, 2018

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A Greater Swiss Mountain Dog named Chance, rescued in Canada after being abandoned with a severe limb deformity, is walking better today, thanks to veterinarians at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine who used advanced 3-D technology to operate on him in February.

A pot-bellied pig named Bebop, who also received limb-corrective surgery at UF last November with 3-D printing help, is back to rooting in his yard in Port St. Lucie, Florida, which he’d stopped doing after a painful shoulder injury.

Chance and Bebop are the first two clinical cases treated over the past six months at UF through the use of a state-of-the-art 3-D printer that uses high-performance plastics and offers numerous advances in patient care, teaching and research, UF veterinarians say.

Among the printer’s capabilities are the ability to create bone models with which veterinarians can ‘‘practice’’ a surgical procedure before the actual surgery, and the ability to create patient-specific surgical guides that improve accuracy and reduce surgery time.

“We have the Rolls-Royce of 3-D printers,” said Adam Biedrzycki, B.V.Sc., Ph.D., an assistant professor of large animal surgery at UF, who purchased the printer with start-up funds when he was hired by the UF College of Veterinary Medicine three years ago. “It can not only print parts that are approved in the aerospace industry to go into aircraft but also parts that are biocompatible for medical applications. That is, they can be used in live tissues.”

This is important, he said, because he and UF small animal surgeons, including Stanley Kim, B.V.Sc., an associate professor of small animal surgery who sought out a collaboration with the Biedrzycki lab and subsequently operated on Chance, wanted bone models that “actually feel and handle like the real thing” during presurgery practice.

“If you use cheap plastic, when you drill it or cut it, it tends to melt, so it does not perform like the real thing,” Biedrzycki said. “So, for practicing surgeries or for teaching, it is not the best thing.”

Although 3-D technology is being used in surgeries at a handful of veterinary teaching hospitals in the United States, UF’s printing capabilities are unique for several reasons. The printer and the materials it uses are high quality, being located at the college allows for a quick turnaround time, and the software allows surgeries to be planned out on a computer ahead of time.

“We can first make the cuts and simulate the repair and unite the bones virtually with plates and screws in the 3-D computer environment, then print them out and complete the surgery using the printed models,” Biedrzycki said. “This means time spent on the front end leads to time saved in the operating room, greater patient safety due to reduced risk and enhancement of surgical accuracy.”

The process begins with the inputting of diagnostic CT scans into specialized software the veterinarians use to plan a specific surgical procedure. Then, a model of the patient’s bone is printed, to which a customized 3-D printed surgical guide is attached.

“We affix the guide with a couple of pins, and like Cinderella’s slipper, it fits absolutely perfectly and only fits that bone,” Kim said. “It’s matched to the contour of the bone, then we know just where to cut.”

He said the printer’s primary usefulness clinically is the ability to create these customized printed guides.

Biedrzycki has only used the technology clinically on Bebop, the pot-bellied pig, who had a chronic shoulder luxation that required a complicated surgery to correct.

“We didn’t use the guide in Bebop’s case, but we eyeballed where we’d make the cut on the bones, then contoured bone plates to fit the model so we’d know where to put the plates in surgery. The procedure went much more rapidly because we did a lot of the hard work beforehand.”

Biedrzycki is investigating the technology’s potential for surgery on horse hooves. He also is excited about the potential use of 3-D printing in teaching and research.

“We are doing and trying things with the 3-D printer in the veterinary medical field that people haven’t done before, particularly if you look at the implantable high-performance plastics,” Biedrzycki said. “What is key for us is that the printer is in a surgeon-friendly lab rather than locked away in some engineering department on campus printing one-off examples. The guides and work we are doing are changing the way we approach cases. We hope that the knowledge and expertise we have will allow this to become routine, benefiting many more patients.”

Kristin Campbell of Port St. Lucie, Bebop’s owner, said the 2-year-old pig is doing well and that his recovery exceeded their expectations.

As for Chance, life has taken a huge turn for the better thanks to the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Rescue Foundation, which facilitated his transport to UF — and the procedure Kim conducted to help him.

 “Chance was found tied to a pole with a note asking that someone please find a new home for him,” said Pat Saxon, who is president and chair of the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog rescue group based in Bradenton. “He was then taken to a shelter in Canada and we were contacted to see if we could help.”

A veterinarian in Canada diagnosed the dog with a bilateral patellar luxation due to limb deformities, with the right hind leg being the most severely affected. Aware of the 3-D technology, the veterinarian believed it could help Chance, although he felt the prognosis was guarded at best, Saxon said.

“Thankfully, Dr. (Stanley) Kim’s expertise proved him incorrect,” she said. “He was so gracious in answering any question I had prior to seeing Chance that we decided to take him to UF.”

During his recuperation period, Chance received water treadmill therapy in Sarasota and has continued to recuperate well. Although he may still need surgery on his other leg, Saxon plans to see how Chance does over the summer.

“We are so happy to see him be able to walk, run and play more normally,” she said.

                                                                               

The University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine is supported through funding from UF Health and the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF FELINE PRACTITIONERS RELEASES NEW FELINE ANESTHESIA GUIDELINES 
TO THE VETERINARY COMMUNITY

First exclusive Feline Anesthesia Guidelines authored by an expert panel aim to make anesthesia and sedation safer for the feline patient

[HILLSBOROUGH, NJ – July 10, 2018] The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) today released the first Feline-specific Anesthesia Guidelines to the veterinary community, which are published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. General anesthesia is an essential component of feline practice, without which surgery and certain other treatment modalities and diagnostic procedures would be impossible. These Feline-focused Guidelines are vital to cat health. Due to their unique physiology and small size, cats undergoing anesthesia are at a relatively greater risk of complications and mortality than many other species. Empirical evidence shows that cats undergoing anesthesia have a higher mortality rate compared with dogs.1,2

Relying on a standardized, evidence-based approach for administering anesthesia is especially useful for ensuring the patient’s safe and predictable perioperative response and recovery. These Guidelines address specific causes of disparities and ways of avoiding perioperative complications associated with monitoring, airway management, fluid therapy, and recovery. Additionally, the Guidelines discuss other important aspects of feline anesthesia, including perianesthetic anxiety and stress, perianesthetic monitoring by physical and electronic means, the role of underlying diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the correct use of anesthesia equipment, and total injectable anesthesia. Content has been organized in the following areas: use and care of equipment, preanesthetic assessment, comorbidities, critical patient emergencies, anesthesia and sedation, perioperative complications, and anesthesia recovery. 

“The overarching purpose of the AAFP Anesthesia Guidelines is to make anesthesia and sedation safer for the feline patient. We are committed to improving the health and welfare of all cats and providing this resource to veterinary teams is an important milestone,” said Heather O’Steen, CEO of the AAFP.

The Guidelines were authored by an expert panel and include visuals and other information designed to minimize risks associated with anesthesia; namely, tables, charts, and algorithms that are very useful resources for veterinary teams. These invaluable tips and techniques for the practice team start even before the patient leaves home and goes through the critical recovery period. The associated client brochure provides cat caregivers with digestible information that enables them to understand anesthesia, what to expect, properly prepare their cat for a procedure, and care for them during recovery (catfriendly.com/anesthesia).

“By proactively developing an individualized anesthetic plan that considers the uniqueness of each feline patient and recognizing that ‘one size does not fit all,’ the experience for the cat can be improved and the outcome successful. It is our hope that these Guidelines will become the practice’s go-to resource and each team member will have a new awareness of all the tools and techniques available to them,” in a joint statement, said Guidelines Co-Chairs Susan M. Gogolski, DVM, PMP, DABVP (Canine/Feline) and Sheilah A. Robertson, BVMS (Hons), PhD, DACVAA, DECVAA, DACAW, DECAWBM (WSEL), MRCVS.

It is recommended that these Guidelines – endorsed by the International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) – be used in conjunction with other previously published guidelines (freely accessible at catvets.com/guidelines), such as those on feline friendly handling, feline friendly nursing care, senior care, pain management, and fluid therapy, as they each contain specific information that should be considered when sedating and/or anesthetizing cats. The Anesthesia Guidelines and associated supplemental resources are available for download on the AAFP website (catvets.com/anesthesia) so practice teams can easily retrieve, print, and laminate them for quick reference. They can also be attached to anesthesia machines and displayed on walls in the preparation, surgery, and recovery areas.

To access the Guidelines, supplemental resources, and client brochure, visit: catvets.com/anesthesia.

To access the AAFP’s consumer site with anesthesia information for cat owners, visit: catfriendly.com/anesthesia

1 Dyson DH, Maxie MG and Schnurr D. Morbidity and mortality associated with anesthetic management in small animal veterinary practice in Ontario. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc1998; 34: 325–335.

2 Brodbelt DC, Pfeiffer DU, Young LE, et al. Risk factors for anaesthetic-related death in cats: results from the confidential enquiry into perioperative small animal fatalities (CEPSAF). Br J Anaesth 2007; 99: 617–623.

# # #

About the American Association of Feline Practitioners
The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) supports its members in improving the health and welfare of cats through high standards of practice, continuing education, and evidence-based medicine. As a trusted leader in the veterinary community, the AAFP has a long-standing reputation and track record for facilitating high standards of practice and providing educational resources to veterinary teams, including guidelines for practice excellence and an annual conference. Over the years, the AAFP has encouraged veterinary professionals to continuously re-evaluate preconceived notions of practice strategies in an effort to advance the quality of feline medicine practiced. Launched in 2012, the Cat Friendly Practice® (CFP) program (catvets.com) was created to improve the treatment, handling, and overall healthcare provided to cats. Its purpose is to provide veterinary practices with the tools and resources to reduce stress associated with the visit and elevate the standard of care provided to cats. With the belief that cat caregivers are instrumental to feline health and welfare, in 2017, the AAFP launched catfriendly.com, a consumer-focused reliable educational resource.

About the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
The Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery is the official journal of the AAFP and the ISFM and is published in partnership with SAGE. All AAFP and ISFM and guidelines are free to access and download from guidelines.jfms.com.

 

This is your chance to enter your favorite work from the past year for the chance to win a Maxwell Medallion and special awards!

This year there are 23 special awards for a total of $15,950 in cash prizes! The complete list is below. We are so grateful to our generous sponsors for supporting dog writing!
Enter Now
 

AKC Club Publication Excellence Award

Sponsored by the American Kennel Club, this award is for the best article in a national, regional or local AKC club publication in magazine or newsletter format. The award consists of a plaque and a $500 cash grant.

 

AKC Reunite Microchip Awareness Award

Sponsored by AKC Reunite for the best article on how microchips can be used in pet recovery. Articles can include recovery stories of how dogs were identified or returned to owners, permanent identification in cases of theft, uses of microchips to confirm identity of dogs in competition, etc. The award is a $1,000 cash grant. For information about actual recovery stories, writers can contact AKC Reunite at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Public Service Award

Sponsored by the American Kennel Club, this award goes to the writer of a print or online feature article that best educates pet owners about responsible dog ownership. The award consists of a plaque and a $500 cash grant. To enter, submit one article, which must also be entered in this year’s contest in one of the regular categories.

 

The AKC Family Dog Award

Sponsored by the American Kennel Club, this award is for the best writing (including books, articles and blog posts) about any or all of the good manners programs under the AKC Family Dog umbrella, including AKC Therapy Dog, AKC Trick Dog, AKC Canine Good Citizen, AKC Community Canine, Urban CGC and AKC S.T.A.R. Puppy. While participating in these activities that are fun for both dogs and people, dogs become well-socialized and develop a lifelong bond with their owners. This award consists of a $500 cash grant.

 

The Canine Scribbles Award
Sponsored by Canine Scribbles, LLC, this is awarded for the best article that promotes the reasons to own a purebred canine. The fiction or nonfiction article of 1000 to 1500 words must be published in a print or online publication. The focus of the article should exemplify the virtues of owning a specific purebred dog. A high-resolution .jpeg (at least 300 dpi) should accompany the article that depicts the canine about which the article is written. The article should be clearly and succinctly written, and should outline the advantages of purebred dog ownership, with a unique journalistic voice. $350 cash grant.

 

The Captain William Lewis Judy Award

Sponsored by American Legion Post #348, Brick Township, N.J. and Lisa Begin-Kruysman. For a submission in any form of media that educates the public about the important role our military dogs play in our Armed Forces, including issues affecting their emotional and physical care during their training, active service and retirement. The award consists of a $350 cash grant.

 

The Ceva Heartworm Prevention Award
Sponsored by Ceva Animal Health, this award is for the best article that educates the public about heartworm awareness and prevention tips. The winner will receive a $1,500 grant.

 

DWAA Junior Writer Award

Sponsored by Karen Petit, an author of children’s books, for writers under 18 years of age. This award is to recognize and encourage young writers who exhibit talent, resourcefulness, dedication and integrity in their writing about dogs and dog-related topics. Award: $400 cash grant, DWAA Maxwell Medallion and lapel pin.

 

DWAA Robert H. McKowen Memorial Friends of Rescue Award

Sponsored by his family and friends. For the best article describing the rescue process: adoption, fostering, transporting, home visits or other aspects of rescue. $300 cash grant.

 

The Fear Free Pets Award
Sponsored by Fear Free, LLC, this is awarded for the article, book, blog, TV segment, radio spot, video, column or other creative media format that best educates, promotes, or demonstrates the importance and benefits of taking a dog to a Fear Free certified veterinary professional. This may also include how a dog’s emotional well-being can play a role in all aspects of its life and health, including veterinary care, how decreasing fear, anxiety, and stress is beneficial to the patient and owner both during the veterinary visit and at home, a focus on Fear Free applications pre- and post-veterinary visit, successful case studies/stories of how a dog went from fearful to Fear Free during or throughout the course of a single or series of veterinary visits, positive experiences working with a Fear Free certified veterinary professional or anything that highlights how Fear Free and what it stands for is all around better for staff, patients, and clients. This award consists of a $2,000 cash grant and a one-of-a-kind commemorative award.

 

Fear Free Dog Enrichment Award
Sponsored by Fear Free, LLC, this is awarded for the article, book, blog, TV segment, radio spot, video, column or other creative media formats that best educates, promotes, or demonstrates how enrichment activities (exercise, food puzzles, scent training, etc.) can benefit a dog’s emotional—not just physical—well-being and the role that has in their overall health. This may also include topics relating to how the resulting benefits of such enrichment to the dog’s emotional well-being can help set them up for more successful veterinary visits in the future, thus living a happier, healthier life. This award consists of a $2,000 cash grant and a one-of-a-kind commemorative award.

 

The GNFP Digital Canine Companion Award
Sponsored by GNFP Digital, this award is for the best digital story – online video, blog post or online article with photography that best demonstrates the bond between people and their canine companions. The content must be demonstrated as having been shared through digital media. The winner will receive a $1,000 grant and a special gift.

 

The Harrison Stephens Inspirational Feature Award
Named in honor of Harrison Stephens, a newspaper editor who wrote thought-provoking features marked by journalistic integrity and humor until his death just before his 100th birthday. This award is for a feature article that highlights the human-canine bond and leaves the reader with a smile. Potential topics include working dogs (or a lazy dog with a winning personality), or dog-centric nonprofits that promote positive outcomes for pets and people. The award is sponsored by Sally and Tom Reeder and consists of a $300 grant.

 

The Heroes for Healthy Pets Award
Sponsored by Merck Animal Health, this award is open to all forms of media that cover topics on infectious diseases that affect dogs. The winner will receive a plaque and a $1,500 cash grant.

 

James Colasanti, Jr. Poetry Award  

For the poem/poetry which best exemplifies the unconditional love of a dog. Sponsored by James Colasanti Jr. The award is a $200 cash grant.

 

The Pet Fashion Guild Pet Fashion Award
Sponsored by the Pet Fashion Guild, this award is for a submission in any form of media that demonstrates the enhanced bonds and connections between humans and their dog(s) through pet fashion. This award consists of a $350 cash grant.

 

The PSI Professional Pet Care Award
Sponsored by Pet Sitters International (PSI), this award is presented to the entry that best educates pet owners about the benefits of using professional pet sitters. Qualifying online or print entries include newspaper or magazine articles and blog posts. This award consists of a $300 cash prize.

 

The Rio Award
Sponsored by Jen Reeder and Bryan Fryklund in honor of their beloved Labrador retriever mix, Rio, this award is for an article, book or essay that profiles a dog who changed someone’s life in a profoundly positive way. The award consists of a $300 cash prize.

 

The Sleepypod Pet Safety Award
Sponsored by Sleepypod, this award is for the best article or book that shares tips for pet safety during travel and/or anecdotes of dogs helped by owners who take safety precautions. The award consists of a $500 cash grant.

 

The Take Your Dog Award
Sponsored by Take Your Dog To Work Day® creator Pet Sitters International, this award is presented to the entry that best highlights the special human-canine bond and importance of pet adoptions. Qualifying print or online entries include newspaper or magazine articles, blog posts and personal essays. The award consists of a $300 cash prize.

 

The Walter R. Fletcher Memorial Award

Sponsored by The Westminster Kennel Club in memory of legendary dog show reporter Walter Fletcher, this annual award goes to the reporter who best exemplifies continued press coverage of dog shows in America. The writer must have written a bylined article in a print or online general interest publication about a dog show (or shows). The winner will be honored with a reserved seat in the Walter Fletcher Memorial Chair for both nights of the 2018 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. The chair is located at the end of the front row, in the working press section, on the arena floor of Madison Square Garden. The winner will also receive $300.

 

Dogwise Best Book Award

Sponsored by Dogwise Publishing. $500 to the author of the best book. The winner will be chosen by the president of DWAA from the winners of all the book categories. The award is a $500 cash grant. Do not apply for this award.

 

DWAA Distinguished Service Award

Sponsored by the American Kennel Club, this award honors extraordinary achievement and communications excellence. It recognizes the person who, by word, deed, exemplary conduct, public communication and professional excellence, best promotes the interest of the sport of dogs. The award consists of a plaque and a $1,000 cash grant. Do not apply for this award.

 
Click here for more information or to enter:
Enter Now

As always, we depend on our professional members to volunteer as judges! If you can spare a few hours in late September/early October, please email Contest Chair Laurren Darr:

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Thank you and good luck!

 
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Stay Safe & Support Rescue Pets this 4th of July!
I am thinking of you, your family and your pets during this Fourth of July holiday! 
Since the world is a bit crazier than years past, I just want to give a brief reminder to keep your eyes open, stay safe, and never put you, your family or your pets in compromising situations during this holiday season.. 
In California and many places around the country, there is an enormous amount of illegal fireworks being set of, as you already know. Your pets’ simply cannot stand this horrible time and they become stressed to the point they can break out of anywhere!
There are many herbal remedies available for animals that can be purchased on Amazon. Please remember to use Amazon Smile and choose Linda Blair Worldheart Foundation as your charity of choice. The herbal remedies are also available in many pet stores, which we highly recommend! From now through the Fourth of July, at any time, day or night, reckless people will be shooting off fireworks and trying to scare and hurt animals.
Keep your pets inside and monitor them when they are outside! Please, keep your cat safe as well! I don’t want to go into details about bad teenagers and people that can hurt your pets! If you see an animal being hurt, please call 911!
 I realize people want to go to parties and have fun but your pets have to be number one! Play gentle music loud enough to drown out as many noises as possible. TV programming that won’t upset your pets like a good movie or old-fashioned television shows that air constantly on different channels will also work to drown out the noise of fire crackers and M80s that unruly neighbors might be shooting off. Animals are able to hear the vibration way before you can! Put them away in a room… Just keep them safe! Don’t leave them in hot cars! 
We have been saving people’s pets that have been abandoned at shelters for the last three weeks, and now we are down to the wire as the holiday approaches! The shelters are clearing out as many abandoned pets, as they can to make room for people’s pets that run away from the fireworks!
 They are literally euthanizing really nice dogs and cats that just don’t deserve to be born to die because it’s the Fourth of July week! 
 Make sure your pets’ microchips are up-to-date! If you don’t have your dog or cat microchipped, maybe it is the time to make a veterinarian appointment and get one done! It’s a matter of finding your pet if they run away! Otherwise you’ll never see them again, that’s just the truth nowadays… I don’t want that for you. Below you will see some pictures of a few of the many dogs both small and large that we’ve been rescuing over the last few weeks. We still have many more coming in from a variety of shelters as we are trying to help out as much as we can all over Southern California. 
 Please donate! It is an emergency fund raiser to help as many as we can. We still need food to feed them, portable water that has to be trucked in since we are in the high desert, more housing for the dogs, emergency crates, baby pools for them to cool off in, in the high heat and we keep our window unit air conditioners working to cool down from the high heat so our electrical bills are pretty high!
No donation is too small or large! We are trying to raise $3000 for this Fourth of July holiday to provide the spay and neuters that many shelters are not doing for the rescuers. Right now they are just begging for us to get the pets out to make room! We service our community. I volunteer all of my time in hours, crisscrossing the country, trying to educate on animal welfare, spay and neuter and stamp out animal abuse!
I am forever grateful for your love and support, and as usual we need it now more than ever during the summer! I’m counting on you.
 From the bottom my heart,
 Thank You & Stay Safe,
Linda Blair
 
Meet Our Newest Rescues!
Amazon Smile Donates To LBWF
When shopping on Amazon, please remember to use Amazon Smile and choose Linda Blair Worldheart Foundation as your charity of choice and Amazon will donate 0.5% of your eligible Amazon Smile purchases to LBWF! Click the picture to sign up!
Support LBWF in the Bissell Pet Foundation's
Support The Shelters Sweepstakes!
Now until August 1, 2018, visit www.bissellpetfoundation.org/sweepstakes to vote Linda Blair Worldheart Foundation! One vote per valid email address. Answer a couple questions and then choose California as the state in the drop down box & then choose Linda Blair Worldheart Foundation. Click the picture to vote today!
Linda Blair Worldheart Foundation

Debbie Guardian is president and founder of Opie & Dixie®, a pet product line that focuses on natural and USDA Certified Organic healing balms, grooming aids and non-dietary care solutions designed for pets and tested by humans. As a child growing up in various countries throughout Latin America and the Far East, Debbie’s family always included many interesting pets – cats, dogs, parakeets, fish, turtles, a white mouse, and at one point, a parrot. Her lifelong compassion for animals led Debbie to explore holistic pet care for her beloved Dachshund-Lab rescue mixes, Opal (Opie) and Dixie. The more she studied, the more impassioned and knowledgeable she became about the subject of animal wellness. It was this passion that in 2008 led her to develop her own line of all-natural, chemical-free skin care treatments and grooming products for dogs and cats.

While Debbie’s beloved Opie recently departed the land of earthly fire hydrants and dog parks for off-leash romps amid the clouds, Dixie, Nu, and husband, Alex remain by her side for inspiration and to share her love, ideas, and new products with.

www.opieanddixie.com

 

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