Displaying items by tag: pets in the classroom

As many students swapped classrooms for computers over the past year, a new survey of 2,000 parents across the UK and US finds that their children’s classmates in the virtual learning setting – their pets—provided real mental health, academic and social benefits. Research has long shown the benefits of having pet interaction in a physical classroom setting and this study confirms these benefits are now being seen in virtual education environments as well. The survey reveals pets helped children cope during the pandemic -- decreasing loneliness, anxiety, and stress and providing a source of motivation for their studies helping improve academic performance. This is positive news in light of early indicators the pandemic has had a negative impact on children’s social skills and well-being, with a recent report finding over 1.5 million children in the UK alone will need additional mental health support as a consequence of the pandemic.

 

Pre-Kindergarten through 8th grade teachers who are interested in owning or already own a classroom pet can apply to receive funding through the Pets in the Classroom grant program.

The Pet Care Trust's Pets in the Classroom grant program will begin accepting applications for the 2016-2017 school year beginning August 1st.  The grant program provides Pre-Kindergarten through 8th grade teachers in both private and public schools who desire to introduce a pet into the classroom or already have a pet in the classroom with funding toward a small animal or for pet supplies.  Interested teachers are welcome to apply.

Studies, including one completed by the American Humane Association and the Pet Care Trust, indicate that classroom pets provide a variety of benefit to students.  These studies reinforce teachers’ experience  that classroom pets: aid in improving school attendance, encourage nurturing, build self esteem, promote empathy, teach responsibility, stimulate learning, enrich the classroom experience, and become friends. This is why the Pet Care Trust has established the goal of introducing 5 million children in 100,000 classrooms to pets and the benefits they provide.  And with 76,475 grants having been issued since the program’s inception, nearly 3 million children have already experienced these benefits thanks to the Pets in the Classroom grant program. 

The program was established by the Pet Care Trust with the knowledge that, while they are a valuable teaching tool, many teachers have very limited resources for the support of classroom animals.  Through the grant program, teachers have the option to obtain a pet through one of the program’s participating retailers- Petco, Petsmart, Pet Supermarket, Pet Supplies Plus, Petland, and Petland Discounts – or to purchase their pet through a local pet store through a rebate grant.  Past grant recipients are not eligible to receive funding for a new classroom pet, but are welcoming to apply for a sustaining grant, which provides up to $50 to maintain an existing classroom pet. With eight different grant types, each teacher has the opportunity to choose which grant is right for him or her through a direct, no-hassle application on the Pets in the Classroom website (www.PetsintheClassroom.org).

For more information, visit www.PetsintheClassroom.org.   

 

The Pets in the Classroom grant program is able to provide 60 teachers with funding to purchase classroom pets thanks to money raised during America’s Family Pet Expo.

The Pet Care Trust is pleased to announce that 60 teachers will be receiving Pets in the Classroom Grants thanks to a donation through the World Pet Association (WPA), Hikari Sales USA, and other pet-related businesses.  Nearly $6,200 was raised for the Pets in the Classroom grant program at the WPA’s April 22-24, 2016 America’s Family Pet Expo in Orange County, California. The money raised will fund 60 teacher grants, allowing 2,500 students to experience the benefits of interacting with pets in the school setting.

https://us.vocuspr.com/Publish/1193095/vcsPRAsset_1193095_119235_89040fae-3b4e-48d2-8307-a02fbc358f85_0.jpgThe Expo, which is known for its notable history of placing animals in forever homes and educating people on responsible pet care, featured a Betta Fish Toss booth in which attendees had the opportunity to win a betta fish by throwing a ping pong ball into cups of water.  Aquatic Companies Dolphin, Estes, and Hikari Sales USA, Inc. all donated products for the Betta Toss while Hikari Sales USA President and Pet Care Trust Board member Chris Clevers also spent the weekend helping at the booth.

"The Pet Care Trust sincerely appreciates the tremendous support that the World Pet Association and Chris Clevers have provided to the Pets in the Classroom program,” said Steven T. King, Executive Director for the Pet Care Trust.  “Thanks to their efforts and the donations made by Dolphin, Estes, and Hikari USA Sales, Inc., thousands of kids will be able to experience the joys of a classroom pet as a result. The support of those in the pet industry have been instrumental in the continued growth of this wonderful program.”

Clevers has been instrumental in raising funds for the grant program at the annual Expo since 2011.  His dedication to the program is evident in his and his wife’s donation of time and products to fundraising efforts, and in his involvement in the Pet Care Trust board.  Clevers commented:

“We feel this program is extremely important to teachers and their students as it allows children to interact with animals and reconnect with nature while providing firsthand experience developing responsibility and compassion as well as helping the teachers with daily lesson plans designed around the animals. No program in the pet industry does more to foster pet parents of the future than Pets in the Classroom. We’re pleased we could support such a worthwhile and important program. We only wish more companies in our industry would join us.”

The Pets in the Classroom program was established by the Pet Care Trust to assist teachers in obtaining or maintaining classroom pets. The Pets in the Classroom program benefits students by teaching them responsible, long-term pet care at an early age and providing the psychological and developmental benefits associated with the human-animal bond.  Studies have shown that caring for pets has a positive effect on children, improving school attendance and teaching children responsibility, as well as encouraging nurturing and building self-esteem.

For more information on the World Pet Association and its events, visit www.WorldPetAssociation.org, or for more information on the Pet Care Trust and its Pets in the Classroom grant program, visit www.petsintheclassroom.org.

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Pets in the Classroom invites teachers to submit pictures of the habitats of their classroom pets.

The Pets in the Classroom grant program invites pre-kindergarten through 8th grade teachers with classroom pets to enter the Pets in the Classroom Habitat Contest. Now through December 15th, teachers can submit pictures of their classroom pet’s habitat.  All entries are being featured on the Pets in the Classroom website, and people are invited to vote for their favorite habitat.  The teacher whose entry receives the most votes when the contest ends will be selected as one of the contest winners and two additional teachers will also be selected as winners based on random selection.  Each winner will receive a $100 Amazon Gift Card.

“Teachers are endlessly creative in incorporating pets into their classroom environment,” noted Steve King, Pet Care Trust executive director. “We wanted to give teachers an opportunity to share their creativity with their peers. The Habitat Contest is a fun way to inspire others.”

The Pets in the Classroom grant program provides grants to Pre-Kindergarten through 8th grade teachers in both private and public schools for the purpose of purchasing and maintaining classroom pets.  Classroom animals are wonderful resources for teachers that, when incorporated into lesson plans, can have a profound impact.  Classroom pets not only provide excitement in the classroom, but they also benefit students by teaching them responsible, long-term pet care at an early age and providing the psychological and developmental benefits associated with the human-animal bond.  Studies have shown that caring for pets has a positive effect on children, improving school attendance and teaching children responsibility, as well as encouraging nurturing and building self-esteem. 

For more information on the Pets in the Classroom grant program or the Habitat Contest, visit www.PetsintheClassroom.org.

Pets in the Classroom grant program provides teachers with funding to enhance classroom through small animal pets.

With the 2nd semester of school approaching, teachers are looking for new ways to bring excitement to the classroom as students return from break.  The Pets in the Classroom grant program is prepared to help teachers provide an important tool that can increase student engagement while also providing educational, social and emotional benefits: classroom pets.

The Pet Care Trust's Pets in the Classroom grant program provides grants to Pre-Kindergarten through 8th grade teachers in both private and public schools for the purpose of purchasing and maintaining classroom pets.  Classroom animals are wonderful resources for teachers that, when incorporated into lesson plans, can make learning fun in any subject.

For example, Mr. Powell, a first grade teacher at Weaverville Primary School in Weaverville, PA, created a classroom project that involved writing persuasive papers, doing research and more in order to obtain a classroom pet:

The benefits to this is that the students are engaged, excited and that they can see actual real world results from the work that they are doing. We are able to use this to academically work on writing, science, math and social skills. We have had to talk about how to get our point across to others and how we should respond and be respectful and polite when people help us. Students are having conversations, taking notes and doing research that might not have happened without this project. It has built up their confidence and creativity within themselves...students that are often quite and a little withdrawn in class have been more outspoken.

And the benefits don't occur only from academic projects.  Cynthia Hansford, fourth grade teacher at Gwendolyn Woolley Elementary School in Las Vegas, NV stated:

I had a great classroom experience with the pets.  My class really enjoyed it and it also helped them academically.  They did research to learn more about our pets, which led to them wanting to learn more about other animals.  What I thought was the most amazing wasn't so much the academics.  My kids were excited about school and the pets.  They told their parents, their friends and their siblings.  Everyday after school I had people in my room talking about, learning about and appreciating an animal most of them never had any experience with.  

Classroom pets not only provide excitement in the classroom, but they also benefit students by teaching them responsible, long-term pet care at an early age and providing the psychological and developmental benefits associated with the human-animal bond.  Studies have shown that caring for pets has a positive effect on children, improving school attendance and teaching children responsibility, as well as encouraging nurturing and building self-esteem. 

Many school teachers have very limited resources for the support of classroom animals, and because the Pet Care Trust believes in the value of classroom pets, it began supporting teachers with this educational grants program in 2010. The grant program has awarded over 50,000 grants to teachers, with over 13,400 of them being awarded this school year.  This equates to over 2.5 million kids who have been given the opportunity to have a better school experience through the Pets in the Classroom grant program.

For more information on the Pets in the Classroom grant program, visit .

Pets in the Classroom launches social media campaign to raise $60,000 to aid educators and students

The Pets in the Classroom grant program is joining the crowdfunding revolution in an effort to raise funds needed to help them reach their goal of impacting the lives of 5 million students by 2017 through classroom pets and the benefits they provide.   With a hope of raising $60,000, Pets in the Classroom is asking people to support the grant program by making a donation at StartSomeGood.com.

 Donations to Pets in the Classroom will aid in the development and learning of children inspired by interactions with a classroom pet. Classroom pets benefits students by teaching them responsible, long-term pet care at an early age and providing the psychological and developmental benefits associated with the human-animal bond. Studies have shown that caring for pets has a positive effect on children, improving school attendance, teaching children responsibility, encouraging nurturing and building self-esteem.  Numerous Pets in the Classroom grant recipients have confirmed the emotional and educational value to students in having small animals in the classroom as well as the importance of having the financial support of the Pets in the Classroom grant program:

"My students come from very poor, rough neighborhoods and homes. When school first started six weeks ago, I had to write multiple referrals per day for violent acts. Since Ella the Guinea Pig came to share our classroom, I have not [had] any violent acts and the noise level has gone way down because they don't want her to be frightened. They beg their families to let them bring a carrot stick from home or they ask me if they can save part of their lunch to share with her. The best part is watching the empathy they developed for Ella begin to transfer to their peers. Ella has done something in four weeks that I may or may not have been able to do all year."

~ Marie Roberts, Prime Prep Academy, Fort Worth, Texas

"My experience with the program has been overwhelmingly positive.  I am an elementary music teacher in a low income district in southern New Jersey, serving approx. 650 students per year.  "Phil", our bearded dragon has become a school mascot of sorts.  Not a school day goes by without countless students coming to see him, talk to him, or for the privileged ones, feed him.  He has become an integral part of science lessons in several classrooms, graphing and charting his growth rate, and even has his own Instagram page.  Students are very motivated to be chosen as the weekly "Phil's Feeders Club".  I cannot thank the grant enough for opening my eyes to just how much ANY student can benefit from the experience."

~Chris Hannah, Dr. William Mennies Elementary School, Vineland, New Jersey              

 “Through this grant, we were able to offset the cost of a few months supply of food and hay.  By saving these costs, we are able to provide more educational supplies and materials to our students.” 

~ Lani Douglas, Inman Park Cooperative Preschool, Atlanta, Georgia

 Pets in the Classroom is overseen by the Pet Care Trust, a non-profit, charitable, public foundation  incorporated in Washington, D.C. in 1990. The Pets in the Classroom grant program was established by the Pet Care Trust with the knowledge that, while they are a valuable teaching tool, many teachers have very limited resources for the support of classroom animals.  Through this educational grants program, teachers can obtain a grant for the purchase of new pets, pet environments, or pet food, and supplies for existing classroom pets through a direct, no-hassle grant application on the Pets in the Classroom website ().

To date, more than 50,000 grants have been awarded to elementary and middle school classrooms. Each grant, ranging from $75-$125, aids one classroom, and on average 45 children. Since the program began just four years ago, The Pets in the Classroom grant has impact around 2,250,000 children. To help Pets in the Classroom reach 27,000 more students through the crowdfunding campaign, donate at http://startsomegood.com/Venture/pets_in_the_classroom. ;

About Pets in the Classroom http://www.petsintheclassroom.org/

Pets in the Classroom is a grants program supporting responsible pet care for our public and private school classrooms. Grants are available for elementary teachers grades pre-K through 8th grade.

About StartSomeGood http://www.startsomegood.com

StartSomeGood aims to empower people from around the world to create social impact by connecting those with ideas for improving the world with the financial and intellectual capital they need to take action.

Over 1.9 million kids have been given the opportunity to have a better school experience through the Pets in the Classroom grant program, and the number is on the rise.  The program, which provides funding to pre-K through 8th grade teachers across the country to purchase and maintain classroom pets, has awarded over 15,250 grants to teachers this year alone, impacting students by boosting their self-esteem, giving them excitement for learning, teaching them responsibility, or simply giving them a friend.  And with the beginning of the 2nd semester just setting in, we hope that more teachers will discover the positive impact classroom pets can have.

Please take a moment to read the press release below, outlining the goals of the Pets in the Classroom grant program and the strides we have made so far.  We would appreciate your help in letting teachers know about the grant so we can continue to help positively impact our youth through classroom pets!

 

Pet Care Trust offers Cure to 2nd Semester Boredom through Classroom Pets

Grants available to eligible Pre-Kindergarten through 8th grade teachers nationwide

With teachers facing cold weather blues and 2nd semester tedium, one organization is ready to help provide some excitement and warmth to classrooms across the country. The Pet Care Trust is once again aiding teachers in obtaining an important educational tool in 2014: classroom pets.

The Pet Care Trust's Pets in the Classroom grant program will continue to provide grants in 2014 to Pre-Kindergarten through 8th grade teachers in both private and public schools for the purpose of purchasing and maintaining classroom pets.  Classroom animals are wonderful resources for teachers that, when incorporated into lesson plans, can make learning fun in any subject. Plus, studies have shown that caring for pets has a positive effect on children, improving school attendance and teaching children responsibility, as well as encouraging nurturing and building self esteem.

The grant program, which began in 2010, has awarded over38,000 grants to teachers, with over 15,250 of them being awarded this school year.  This equates to over 1.9 million kids who have been given the opportunity to have a better school experience through the Pets in the Classroom grant program. With a goal of introducing 5 million children in 100,000 classrooms to pets and the benefits they provide, the Trust hopes that the 2013-2014 school year will continue to see a large number of grant applicants.

“We are delighted with the continued growth of the Pets in the Classroom program,” commented Pet Care Trust Executive Director Steve King. “Teachers tell us every day that introducing a pet into their classroom has increased students’ enthusiasm for school, improved in-class behavior and added an element of fun into their daily routine. We are committed to helping every teacher who wants a classroom pet to get one.”

Many school teachers have very limited resources for the support of classroom animals, and the Pet Care Trust believes in supporting teachers with this educational grants program. Teachers can apply for a direct, no-hassle grant through the Pets in the Classroom website (www.PetsintheClassroom.org). The program offers different types of grants, giving each teacher the opportunity to choose which grant is right for him or her.

For more information on the Pets in the Classroom grant program, visit www.PetsintheClassroom.org.

The Pet Care Trust’s Pets in the Classroom grant program has helped more than 15,000 classrooms, with many more classrooms yet to be impacted.

Bel Air, Maryland - With more than 500,000 elementary and middle school students having already been given the opportunity to interact with pets on a daily basis in their classroom, the Pet Care Trust board has announced a new goal for its Pets in the Classroom Grant Program: Within the next five years, Pets in the Classroom will introduce 5 million children in 100,000 classrooms to pets and the benefits they provide.

The new goal for this teacher grant program comes after the much quicker-than-anticipated growth of the program in the last couple of years:

“The Trust Board set a long-term goal of reaching 1 million kids by providing 30,000 Pets in the Classroom grants,” said Pet Care Trust executive director Steve King. “We have reached the half-way point to this goal far sooner than any of us thought possible. It really is a remarkable achievement thanks to the Board’s foresight and the support of so many pet retailers and suppliers.”

While the growth of the program began slowly, providing 3,200 grants in the 2010-2011 school year, the addition of Pets in the Classroom grants through Petsmart and Petco, along with rebate grants supported by independent pet stores, resulted in an increase to over 6,000 grants for the 2011-12 school year. Also, in the beginning of 2012, the program expanded to include 7th and 8th grade classrooms, while in previous years the grants had only been available to pre-k - 6th grade teachers. This expansion to include middle school classrooms increased the number of students impacted by the grants, making the overall average of students impacted over 50 students per classroom. Then, in preparation for the 2012-13 school year, the Trust added additional programs through Pet Supermarket and Carolina Biological Supply. The response from teachers in the first two months of this new school year has been overwhelming. More than 6,800 grants have been issued since August 1, bringing the total to 15,500 grants since the program’s inception.

The Pets in the Classroom program benefits students by teaching them responsible, long-term pet care at an early age and providing the psychological and developmental benefits associated with the human-animal bond. Studies have shown that caring for pets has a positive effect on children, improving school attendance and teaching children responsibility, as well as encouraging nurturing and building self esteem. To learn more about the benefits of classroom pets as well as more about the Pets in the Classroom grant program, visit www.petsintheclassroom.org.