Displaying items by tag: monkeys

Movie review written by Jon Patch with 3.5 out of 4 paws

The Croods: A New Age

DreamWorks Animation and Universal Pictures present a PG, 95-minute, Animation, Adventure, Comedy, directed by Joel Crawford, written by Kevin and Dan Hageman with a theater release date of November 25, 2020.

 

“Exotic animals may seem fun and like extravagant, novel gifts, but there are tremendous risks involved.” - Born Free USA’s CEO

Washington, D.C., November 28, 2016 -- With the holiday shopping and gift-giving season upon us, Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, wants to remind everyone about the serious dangers of giving a live animal as a pet. In particular, the purchase of exotic animals as gifts is a concerning phenomenon. As revealed in last month’s report from Born Free USA, Downloading Cruelty: An Investigation into the Online Sales of Exotic Pets in the U.S., there is a widespread online trade of exotic animals as “pets," including monkeys, lions, tigers, cheetahs, wolves, kangaroos, foxes, snakes, sloths, and more. All of these animals can be available with just one click online, making them far too easy to bring home this holiday season. 

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, “Exotic animals may seem like fun, extravagant, and novel gifts, but the reality is that they have tremendously complex needs that require extensive care and commitment. While it is incredibly easy to buy a snake, sugar glider, or fox online, that does not mean that it will be easy to have that animal in your home. Despite claims made by exotic animal breeders, not one of these animals is “tame.” Purchasing an exotic animal as a holiday present perpetuates the abusive circumstances of breeding and captivity, and puts people at risk by exposing them to a wild animal who belongs IN the wild.”

As demonstrated in the Downloading Cruelty report, the enormous popularity of internet shopping has significant repercussions for the trade in exotic animals as pets, because animals who were never offered at a pet store are now visible and available from breeders around the country. The ease of acquiring them over the internet parallels the continuously-growing demand. Since the buyer cannot see the animal beyond a photo, and the shipping and payment options make the purchase simple and fast, the buyer is unlikely to have taken into account or understand the long-term care implications.

Roberts added, “An exotic animal is one of the most dangerous gifts you could give someone. There have been hundreds of attacks on humans that demonstrate the severe threat they pose, and they can also transmit serious and potentially deadly diseases to humans, including salmonella and hepatitis. Protect both animals and your loved ones, and don’t give the present of a monkey, a snake, a turtle, or any other living creature this holiday season. “

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic "pets," trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to America the message of "compassionate conservation": the vision of the U.K.-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free's mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

For the complete report and more, go to www.bornfreeusa.org/DownloadingCruelty.


“The endangered Barbary macaque could get a new chance at survival at CITES CoP17”

September 27, 2016, Johannesburg - For the first time in 30 years, Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will discuss increasing the level of protection for a monkey species. Barbary macaques will take center stage in Johannesburg, alongside emblematic fauna such as elephants, lions, rhinos and sharks.

The CITES Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17), which is currently taking place in South Africa, has the power to change the fate of Barbary macaques and stop their race towards extinction. In an almost unprecedented move, all range States and the main consumer countries providing the market for these animals have rallied together behind a joint Morocco-EU proposal to transfer the species to Appendix I of the Convention, which will afford them the highest level of international protection from trade and help enhance enforcement measures against trafficking in this species. The proposal has also received overwhelming support from the global animal welfare and conservation community. 

The Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus) is the only African primate species north of the Sahara, the only macaque species in Africa and the only non-human primate living in the wild in Europe (Gibraltar). In the last 30 years, the populations of this unique primate in Morocco and Algeria have dwindled from approximately 23,000 to the latest estimates of 6,500 – 9,100. The largest wild subpopulation, which inhabits the mixed cedar forests of the Middle Atlas Mountains in Morocco, has been decimated: only 5,000 remain, a 65% decrease in just three decades.

A significant number of Barbary macaques, mostly infants, are illegally captured from the wild and traded every year, mainly to feed the European exotic pet trade and to be used as tourist photo props. The protection granted to the species both in Morocco and Algeria, its listing on Appendix II of CITES and an EU import ban have done little to help curb poaching and trafficking in these intelligent and sensitive endangered primates. This criminal activity is increasingly in the hands of organized international networks. Barbary macaques remain the most frequently seized CITES-listed live mammal in the EU.

Animal Defenders International (ADI) President Jan Creamer says: “The illegal trade is pushing Barbary macaques to the brink and action must be taken before it is too late. Like so many wild animals, these little monkeys are paying the price for unscrupulous traders bartering with their lives.” It is estimated that approximately 3,000 Barbary macaques could be currently being kept as pets in Europe.
 
Musician Moby said: "I refuse to stand by and do nothing as these endangered monkeys are snatched from the wild and their families for photo props and the pet trade. Barbary macaques need our urgent help and I hope governments will join ADI and 'back the macaque' and grant them the greater protection they need".

Gerben Jan Gerbrandy, Member of the European Parliament for D66 and Head of the European Parliament Delegation to CoP17, agrees on the importance of this moment: “The adoption of the joint proposal from the EU and Morocco would be a key next step in protecting a species for which the EU is unfortunately a key destination market. Now we have to make sure that any agreement is properly and coherently enforced to the fullest effect. That is where the real difference will be made.”

North Africa is the gateway to Europe for other illegal wildlife products, including live specimens such as endangered tortoises. Tackling Barbary macaque trafficking is expected to help with protection of other endangered species, some of which are also on the agenda at CoP17.  

"This truly unique and endangered primate species needs all the protection we can provide as international community. The highest possible protection from CITES will strengthen conservation efforts underway to help the Barbary macaque survive and thrive. It makes total sense to support the range states, Morocco and Algeria, in this goal," adds Rikkert Reijnen of the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

Highly intelligent, emotional and sensitive, Barbary macaques live up to 22 years of age, in social groups comprising as many as 80 individuals, with males playing a primary role in caring for their young. They prefer high altitude cedar forests, but can also be found in oak forests, coastal scrub, and rocky slopes, feeding on fruits, tree leaves, and plants.

Having campaigned for over 20 years to educate the public about the use of primates for entertainment, research, and as pets, exposing the huge numbers of animals taken from the wild each year and the suffering of the animals during captivity and transport, the plight of the Barbary macaque is a cause close to the heart of Animal Defenders International (ADI).
 
Last year, ADI rescued more than 30 illegally traded monkeys in Peru during an 18-month mission against wildlife trafficking and to enforce a ban on wild animals in circuses. Over 100 animals were saved during the operation. Having nursed the monkeys back to health, ADI relocated new family groups from six different primate species to sanctuaries in their native Amazon habitats where ADI continues to fund their care for life.
 
ADI previously rescued two Hamadryas baboons – one from a Bolivian circus and the other from the pet trade in Cyprus. They now live happily together at the Lakeview Monkey Sanctuary in the UK, where ADI funds their care for life, along with three macaques born at the notorious and now closed Israeli monkey breeder Mazor Farm. Born to wild-caught parents, Baloo, Betty and Boo were sold to a European research laboratory and used in neurology experiments. When the monkeys were no longer required, ADI stepped in to save them from being killed.

Scientific support for the proposal

Dr. Shirley McGreal of the International Primate Protection League has also expressed strong support: “I am at the NAPSA (North American Primate Alliance) conference in Tacoma and of course IPPL is delighted that Morocco and the EU have proposed the elevation of the Barbary macaque to Appendix I of CITES. There are less of them in the world than there are humans in the small town where I live!”   

Dr. John Cortes, co-editor of The Barbary Macaque: Biology, Management and Conservation (2006) has been a long-time defender of the species: “I fully support and endorse the proposal. As Minister for the Environment in Gibraltar, a range State for the Barbary Macaque, and familiar with the species in North Africa, I agree fully with the statement and its aims.”

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Efforts to increase protection and better conservation measures for Barbary macaques are being led by the following organizations:

AAP Animal Advocacy and Protection, www.aap.nl/en


Animal Defenders International, www.ad-international.org

Born Free Foundation and Born Free Foundation USA, www.bornfree.org

Eurogroup for Animals, www.eurogroupforanimals.org

Fondation Brigitte Bardot, www.fondationbrigittebardot.fr

Fondation Franz Weber, www.ffw.ch

Humane Society International, www.hsi.org

International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), www.ifaw.org

International Primate Protection League, www.ippl.org

Pro Wildlife, www.pro-wildlife.de

Species Survival Network, www.ssn.org


 
Animal Defenders International (ADI) is active worldwide to end the suffering of captive animals in commercial use: animals used in entertainment – film, television, advertising, circuses and sport or leisure such as hunting or for products such as fur. Replacement of animals in scientific research; funding and promotion of non-animal advanced methods. ADI investigates, produces evidence and reports on the scientific, legal and economic issues for each case study, recommending solutions. Information is distributed to the media, public and officials. Where ADI’s evidence has been a catalyst for change, we collaborate with governments to conduct large scale seizures or rescues of wild animals in captivity and relocate them to forever homes – back to their natural habitat wherever possible.  http://www.ad-international.org
Animal Defenders International: Ending the suffering of animals in captivity and protecting wild animals and their environments
 
 

 

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 “Meet the Animal Artist” Experience Added to Oakland Zoo’s Animals Saving Animals Annual Art Auction

Video Download for Media: https://www.dropbox.com/s/z95s1cgbcfrvanq/ArtExperience.mov?dl=0https://www.dropbox.com/s/z95s1cgbcfrvanq/ArtExperience.mov?dl=0 

Oakland, Calif. -- September 15, 2016 -- Oakland Zoo has added a new twist to the third year of their annual “Animals Saving Animals Art Show” to raise money for animal conservation. Bidding winners get to come to the Zoo to be part of the painting experience with the animal artist.

Zoos across the country now sell animal paintings as a way to fundraise, but Oakland Zoo wanted to enhance the concept by personalizing the experience. “We saw that people bought these artworks to connect with the animals, so we decided to offer an experience where people could meet an animal artist up-close and behind-the-scenes, for the ‘creative’ painting process.’ It’s an amazing way to connect with animals at the Zoo, support animal conservation in the wild – and, of course, acquire unique artwork,” said Erin Harrison, Sr. Manager of Marketing & PR at Oakland Zoo.

Artwork created by zoo animals is up for auction on eBay now through Thursday, September 22 at 11am. Artists featured in the Animal Art Show Experience include an elephant, lemur, goat, sun bear, giraffe, parrot, and green monkey. For a complete list of artist names, biographies and bidding link, and additional information on Oakland Zoo’s Animal Art Show Experience, go to: http://www.oaklandzoo.org/Animal_Art_Show_2016.php

“The Animal Art Show Experience is a triple win; it provides fun enrichment activity for our animals, helps support the conservation of wildlife, and draws public attention to the various conservation challenges that animals face,” said Amy Gotliffe, Conservation Director at Oakland Zoo. “The Animal Art Show is also a perfect example of how the entire Oakland Zoo staff embraces our conservation efforts, from our Marketing Department to our Animal Care team. We hope the lucky winners of this unique art know that they took action for wildlife every time they look at it.”

None of the animals are forced or coerced into participating in the Art Show. The painting sessions are conducted with zookeepers, using only positive-reinforcement methods to encourage voluntary participation. The paint used is non-toxic and water based. All funds raised from the auction will benefit Oakland Zoo’s conservation partners, who are working in the field to save wild animals.

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area's award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid's activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to the humane treatment of animals and wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide; with 25¢ from each ticket donated to support conservation partners and programs around the world. The California Trail, a transformational project that more than doubles our size, opens in 2018,

and will further our commitment to animal care, education, and conservation with a focus on this state’s remarkable native wildlife. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information, go to: www.oaklandzoo.org

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March 23, 2016
Dear Jon, It is with great sadness that I tell you that we lost Buddha.Chris, Buddha's caregiver and researcher at the university writes, "When I met Buddha fifteen years ago he was nameless, 7-years old, and had just endured puberty. Despite his youth, a time for squirrel monkeys typified by an overflow of energy, he had an observable calmness that was not present in any of the other squirrel monkeys he was living with, hence his name. Soon after I met him it was discovered that he had naturally occurring epilepsy. This condition meant he was ineligible to be in research studies, but that he could instead be a companion to monkeys that were assigned to studies. Over the years, Buddha was a calm and gentle companion to many, largely because he characteristically let other monkeys set the tone for the relationship.As Buddha aged he required ever increasing care until eventually he needed assisted-living, monkey style. This included a custom designed home with specially wrapped perching, supplemental feedings with Ensure, and help spiffing-up his personal hygiene routine. My love for him compelled me to provide the daily care he needed to live a good life, as long a possible. At times, when the care was apparently too doting, he would protest vocally with an audible and grouchy 'hgrrrrr' telling me to back off, and I did, but mostly he accepted the care with gusto.When we arrived at Jungle Friends on July 1, 2015 he settled in quickly, with his best friend Alan close by, and readily accepted care from Jungle Friends staff and volunteers who doted on him as much as he was accustomed to. It was a great heartbreak in mid-September last year when Buddha's health rapidly declined due to his advanced age. He lived a good and long life. I miss him and fill the void by recalling memories and replaying those grouchy little 'hgrrrrs' of protest in my mind's ear to keep him close."
 
Although Buddhawas not with us for very long, he lives on here at Jungle Friends in our hearts. We miss Buddha's sweet face and his kind disposition every day, he was one special little guy and we were fortunate to have known him.
Kari Bagnall
  Kari Bagnall, Founder & Executive Director 
  Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary 
  386-462-7779
P.S. Please make a donation in memory of Buddha toward our $25,000 matching gift to our Monkey Medical Fund! 
  Like us on Facebook View our videos on YouTube Follow us on Twitter    
Copyright © 2016. All Rights Reserved.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Rescue team catches circus after public tip off

MARCH 13, 2015, Piura, Peru - Animal Defenders International (ADI) and Peruvian authorities SERFOR, ATFFS, the National Police and department of Piura have successfully raided an illegal circus today, rescuing three lionesses and two monkeys as part of a collaborative effort to enforce the country’s ban on the use of wild animals in circuses.

ADI has now removed 24 lions from Peruvian circuses and has in its care almost seventy animals rescued during ADI's Operation Spirit of Freedom.

ADI urged members of the public to be vigilant for any circuses defying the law.  Following a tip off, ADI has been trailing the circus for over a week while liaising with the authorities in preparation for today's seizure.

Early this morning the circus suddenly moved with vehicles leaving in different directions but thanks to an ADI team the vehicle with the animals was stopped just outside Sullana, just north of Piura.

The three lionesses called Africa, Kiara and Muneca, and two monkeys, Valeria and Valentino, are on their way to the ADI Operation Spirit of Freedom rescue center near Lima, where they will join the 21 lions, 31 monkeys and other wild animals who have been saved from circuses and the illegal wildlife trade during the groundbreaking rescue mission.  A further nine lions are in ADI's custody in Colombia.

ADI will be relocating all of the animals to their permanent homes in the coming weeks. Native wildlife will be rehomed in jungle habitats, which are being constructed by ADI in the Peruvian rainforest, at Pilpintuwasi in Iquitos and IkamaPeru. A total of 33 lions, including 9 from a circus in Colombia, will fly on the biggest airlift of its kind to The Wild Animal Sanctuary in the US.

ADI President Jan Creamer said “The ADI mission has always been to ensure no animals are left behind.  We are elated to have saved these animals today and they will get their chance of a new life on the ADI Spirit of Freedom flight.  We will remain vigilant.  There should be no wild animals in circuses so if anyone sees one - they should call ADI."

Jan continued: "this is a historic day for Peru as ADI, SERFOR, the ATFFS and police have shown wild animal acts have no place in modern society and will not be tolerated."

The ban on the use of wild animals in circuses in Peru was secured after a five-year campaign by ADI and Peru's animal protection groups, following its shocking two-year investigation of South American circuses. The investigation led to five national bans on wild animals in circuses in Latin America - worldwide 30 countries have banned wild animal acts.

Efforts by ADI to stop circus suffering in Peru and enforce the law have been  supported by the public and local animal organizations including United for Animals (UPA), Amazon Shelter, Peruvian Association of Animal Protection (ASPPA) and Animals Without Borders (ASF).

ADI is funding all rescue operations in Peru and the huge cost of relocating the animals - the largest single cost will be the flight to the USA.

Jan Creamer:  "This is a wonderful day but it meant bringing our rescue team and trucks loaded with cages up to Piura.  Tonight our precious cargo will be traveling back to Lima where we will have five more mouths to feed and three more travel crates to build.  We urge people to please donate to help this mission.
 
http://www.ad-international.org/FreedomAppealUS

Peru’s ban on wild animals in circuses was passed in 2012 following a successful campaign by ADI and local animal protection groups, following a two-year undercover investigation by ADI which revealed widespread suffering of circus animals across South America. The shocking exposé led to calls for action and nationwide bans followed in Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador and El Salvador.  

Operation Spirit of Freedom was launched in August 2014 with ADI providing complete logistical support to the Peruvian authorities and removing wild animals from circuses all over Peru.  21 lions are in ADI’s care at their temporary Operation Spirit of Freedom rescue center near Lima. ADI has also begun assisting the Colombian authorities with implementation of its wild animal circus ban and is caring for nine lions who will join the Peruvian lions on the flight to the US.   

Legendary, award-winning TV host Bob Barker donated $500,000 to get the rescue mission underway and establish the temporary holding center in Peru.   

ADI estimates that construction of all the habitats for the indigenous wildlife, their care whilst they are constructed, and the cost to relocate the animals, will require $60-80,000 – and possibly more because of the diversity of species.  

Approximately $200,000 is needed for the relocation of the lions from Peru and Colombia.  

National restrictions on performing animals in travelling circuses, either wild, all animals, or in a handful of cases specific species have been enacted in 30 countries – Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, India, Israel, Malta, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Slovenia, Sweden, Taiwan, The Netherlands. Similar laws are under discussion in the UK, USA, Brazil and Chile.   

Animal Defenders International  
www.ad-international.org
With offices in London, Los Angeles and Bogota, ADI campaigns across the globe on animals in entertainment, providing technical advice to governments, securing progressive animal protection legislation, drafting regulations and rescuing animals in distress. ADI has a worldwide reputation for providing video and photographic evidence exposing the behind-the-scenes suffering in industry and supporting this evidence with scientific research on captive wildlife and transport. ADI rescues animals all over the world, educates the public on animals and environmental issues.

Summertime Entertainment (II), Prana Animation Studios and Prana Studios present a PG, 88 minute, animation, family, musical, directed by Will Finn, Dan St. Pierre, written by Adam Balsam and Randi Barnes with a theater release date of May 9, 2014.

ANIMAL DEFENDERS INTERNATIONAL EXPOSES BRUTAL MONKEY FARM SENDING ANIMALS TO U.S. LABORATORIES
 
·      Conscious baby monkeys pinned down and tattooed without anesthetic
·      Plans to set up a monkey breeding farm in Labelle, Florida
·      Rising primate imports
 
An undercover investigation by Animal Defenders International (ADI) has filmed horrific treatment of monkeys at Biodia, a Mauritian monkey factory farm that supplies U.S. laboratories and whose monkeys could soon be behind bars in a new Florida breeding farm (1). The ADI findings come just days after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service revealed that monkey imports are on the rise (2). ADI is calling for the U.S. to stop the import of monkeys for experiments or breeding and for the U.S. to join the international move away from monkey experiments.
 
The ADI investigation took place inside Biodia, one of several Mauritian farms breeding long-tailed macaques for experiments. Findings include: Workers swinging screaming monkeys by their tails; distressed baby monkeys torn from the arms of their desperate mothers and tattooed without anesthetic; monkeys injected in the eyelids for TB tests; monkeys restrained and injected in view of other animals; animals captured from the wild and used as breeding machines; barren, crowded cages; animals killed and injured from fighting; stressful separation of mothers and babies; rough handling; monkeys wrenched from cages by their tails; netted animals slammed onto concrete floors; heavily pregnant monkeys manhandled and pinned down.
 
ADI President Jan Creamer said: “The poor U.S. regulations on primate experiments and imports are shameful, allowing unnecessary suffering, fear, pain and distress to intelligent and highly developed animals when alternatives already exist. U.S. primate imports also cause damage to wild populations and the wider environment. As other nations move away from primate research, the US remains in the scientific backwater, clinging to crude, outdated methods instead of advanced technology. This trade is cruel and unjustified.”
 
Monkeys are snatched from the wild on Mauritius to stock breeding farms. Babies are torn from their mothers prematurely so that the mothers can breed again. The young monkeys born on the farms will be locked in tiny boxes & flown 10,000 miles to U.S. laboratories. During the grueling journey some become sick and can even die (3). Air France & China Southern are the last remaining passenger airlines to fly monkeys destined for laboratories.
 
Monkey imports are on the rise with nearly 20,000 primates imported each year (2). The top importers are controversial Covance, Charles River and Shin Nippon Biomedical Laboratories. Mauritius is the second largest monkey supplier after China, supplying 2,842 animals to the U.S. in 2013, with Biodia supplying 300-600 monkeys each year. Imported monkeys are either sent directly to laboratories for cruel experiments, or are used to breed babies who will end up in laboratories. ADI’s investigation has revealed that Biodia’s U.S. trading partner Prelabs has plans to “establish the first Mauritius breeding colony in the U.S.” in Labelle, Florida (1).
 
Over 70,000 monkeys are used in cruel experiments in the U.S. each year (4). These intelligent, social animals are force-fed chemicals, injected with potentially poisonous substances and electrodes are implanted into their brains. They cry out as they are strapped into restraint chairs to immobilize them for cruel experiments; some experience such extreme fear and distress when being restrained that they suffer rectal prolapses. In experiments studied by ADI, monkeys were killed after suffering blocked lungs, trembling, collapse and bleeding. Terrified monkeys awaiting experiments self-mutilated and one animal chewed his finger to the bone (5, 6).
 
Most monkeys are killed at the end of the experiments, but others are forced to endure years of deprivation in barren cages, with nothing to interest them; fights often occur and monkeys under attack cannot escape due to restricted cage space. Many have been seen performing abnormal behaviors associated with psychological damage.
 
International regulatory bodies, scientists and governments around the world are moving away from monkey experiments and adopting the advanced alternatives which are available. The European Union, made up from 28 countries, has ended the use of apes and wild caught monkeys, placed restrictions on monkey experiments and is phasing out the trade in monkeys born to wild caught parents (7).
 
There are a number of alternatives available to replace monkey experiments, including: microdosing, where tiny amounts of new drugs are safely given to human volunteers - significantly more accurate at assessing the way a product is absorbed, broken down and passed through the body than primate models (8); biochips, which mimic human organs on USB-sized chips “providing comprehensive toxicity data very quickly and cheaply” (9), 3-D tissue engineering using human cells; and QSAR which predicts the toxicity of drugs through comparison with similar substances.
 
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Animal Defenders International With offices in Los Angeles, London and Bogotá, Animal Defenders International campaigns to protect animals in entertainment; replacement of animals in experiments; worldwide traffic in endangered species; vegetarianism; factory farming; pollution and conservation. ADI also rescues animals in distress worldwide. ADI-gathered evidence has led to campaigns and legislative action all over the world to protect them. www.ad-international.org

Animal Defenders International (ADI) has today released an undercover investigation that reveals shocking conditions and violations of animal protection law in South Korea at “Monkey School,” an attraction that forces monkeys to perform in shows:

Monkeys living in squalid and barren conditions, including mothers and their young babies.
Traumatized monkeys exhibiting abnormal behavior, for example constantly spinning around and biting themselves.
Some monkeys isolated, in tiny cages while others were crammed together, all causing stress and psychological damage.
Animals hit during training and dragged along the floor.
Disgraceful contempt for a monkey as it tries to escape with its hands tied behind its back, falling onto its face, as workers laugh at its predicament and terror.

The scenes in South Korea show the same poor living conditions and appalling attitudes to animals that are universal to the performing animals industry that ADI has documented in the US and around the world at circuses and suppliers of performing animals for movies, advertising and television (1). ADI is calling for US citizens not to attend shows with live animal performances, to contact their Member of Congress to support legislation to end the use of wild animals in circuses and sign the petition to end wild animal performances in South Korea.

The ADI investigation of Monkey School in South Korea reveals: squalid and barren living conditions; traumatized animals showing psychotic behavior; animals found dead in cages; animals hit during training; and animals dragged along the floor by their necks.

ADI President, Jan Creamer: “Our investigation of Monkey School in South Korea has shown that performing animals endure extreme cruelty behind the scenes, just as we have found in the US, where we discovered beatings of elephants and other animals, use of electric shocks and the barren, deprived conditions that make animals go out of their minds. Countries around the world are banning animal performances and we hope to see the US do the same. US citizens can stop the cruelty by refusing to watch animal shows and signing our petition supporting South Korea’s new Zoo Act.”

Sharon Shaw, Director of Lakeview Monkey Sanctuary in the UK said: “All aspects of life for primates at Monkey School are appalling, from the inadequate and atrocious housing conditions, the physical and psychological torture, to the lack of empathy and respect shown by the staff. The poor animals who are unlucky enough to live there endure a barbaric, unnatural life.”

South Korea’s animal protection law is limited (2), yet ADI’s investigation has revealed violations by Monkey School including finding a monkey dead, having received no medical treatment; and animals moved to new enclosures without any provision to help them adapt to their new environment.

Congresswoman Hanna Chang has proposed a Zoo Act in South Korea that would ban circus-style animal performances and set minimum welfare standards and inspections for places that exhibit captive animals (3). Congresswoman Chang said: “As seen in the ADI footage, it is hard to imagine the pain that monkeys have to go through for humans every day. This clearly shows that it is now time to have regulations to monitor the welfare of animals in captivity in Korea.”

ADI and its South Korean campaigns partner Korean Animal Rights Alliance have joined over 80 international animal organizations supporting the new Zoo Act (4). The international petition supporting South Korea’s Zoo Act can be signed at: http://bit.ly/ADIKoreaPetition

Twenty five countries around the world have restricted circus animal performances, including Austria, Bolivia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, Greece, Hungary, India, Israel, Poland, Portugal, Peru, Singapore, Sweden and Taiwan (5). The US and Korea are among several countries currently discussing bans on circus animals including Ireland, the UK, Brazil and Germany.

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Jungle Friends logo
Joni with flower
Jungle News
December 5, 2013
Gussie vignette
Gussie, 1968 - 2013


We are all very sad to share the news that Gussie has passed. After a long life of 45 years, she died of old age, surrounded by her loving friends. Her death was peaceful.
Gussie died in Kari's arms.

And for those of you who knew Gussie personally, you won't be surprised to hear she made threat faces right to the end.
As Kari says, "Gussie was a woman of her own mind, and she always told it like was."

During the four days Gussie was in hospice care here, we posted pictures on Facebook , and so many people shared their memories and thoughts of Gussie. Susan Carlucci said what many of us were thinking: "I am so blessed to have been fortunate enough to not only be able to help care for this beautiful girl... but to actually be tolerated by her. We know she is now truly free." Everyone loved Gussie for her epic grumpiness...and for how fiercely she loved and protected her daughter, Joni.

Gussie and Joni last day
Mother and daughter loved to "double-threat" anyone who came near, even if they brought treats!
Even when Gussie could no longer walk this past weekend, she still enjoyed making a good threat face.
Gussie walking

Gussie and Helene
I feel so privileged to have shared some of Gussie's last hours.
Joni has dwarfism and is unable to use her legs -- getting around by walking on her hands, balancing with her tail. Her disability doesn't stop this baby-faced 32-year-old! We have already moved Joni near the other special-needs monkeys -- Puchi, Wendell, Chi Chi and Kooda -- and we'll be watching closely to see who befriends her. Joni has already shown interest in Kooda, and has been cooing and lip-smacking at Max, the boy next door!

Joni got to say goodbye to her mother just after she passed. Now we will all say goodbye. Sweet dreams, dear Gussie. We will take good care of your little girl Joni.

Helene Goldson

 

P.S. Please make a donation to the Gizmo Memorial Medical Fund in memory of Gussie.
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