Displaying items by tag: illness

The Complete Healthy Dog Handbook is a superb, reassuring, and comprehensive work. "Dr. Spock for dogs."—Elle magazine wrote of its first edition, originally published as The Hound Health Handbook, and now completely revised and updated.

Today's dog owners are more attuned to their pets' health and well-being than ever before. And with good reason: Americans spend upward of $10 billion annually on their canine companions. The Complete Healthy Dog Handbook is the one essential and truly readable book for these devoted dog owners. Surpassingly clear and complete, with more than 100 illustrations and diagrams, it covers everything from choosing the best dog to puppy care, nutrition, vaccines, behavior, first aid, and senior care, plus thorough discussions of more than 100 canine illnesses. Reflecting the latest advances in veterinary medicine, this edition offers up-to-the-minute advice on "design dog" breeds, pet food safety, homemade diets, changing vaccine protocols, new medications for allergies, car sickness, obesity, and heart disease, developments in surgery and cancer treatment, pet insurance, and more.

With The Complete Healthy Dog Handbook, the vet is always in.

 

Author Bio:

Betsy Brevitz, D.V.M., had a ten-year career as a magazine writer and editor before becoming a veterinarian. A 1998 graduate of the highly regarded Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, she now lives and practices in northern New Jersey. The Complete Healthy Dog Handbook: The Definitive Guide to Keeping Your Dog Happy, Healthy, and Active originated with her "Ask the Vet" column for the acclaimed website Urbanhound.com.

Movie review written by Jon Patch with 3 out of 4 paws

Dolittle

Universal Pictures, Team Downey and Perfect World Pictures present a PG, 106 minutes, Adventure, Comedy, Family film directed by Stephen Gaghan, written by Gaghan and Dan Gregor with a theater release date of January 17, 2020.

Movie review written by Jon Patch with 2.5 out of 4 paws

The Farewell

A24, Big Beach Films, Depth of Field and Kindred Spirit present a PG, 100 minute, Comedy, Drama, directed and written by Lulu Wang with a theater release date of July 12, 2019.

Review written by Jon Patch with 3 out of 4 paws

The Big Sick

Lionsgate, Amazon Studios, Apatow Productions and FilmNation Entertainment present 119 minute, R rated, Comedy, Romance film directed by Michael Showalter, written by Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon with a theater release date of July 14, 2017.

Review written by Jon Patch with 2 out of 4 paws

Everything, Everything

Warner Bros. Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Itaca Films and Alloy Entertainment present a PG-13, 96 minute, Romance, Drama directed by Stella Meghie, screenplay by J. Mills Goodloe and based on the book by Nicola Yoon with a theater release date of May 19, 2017.

HOW TO MAKE IT THROUGH VET SCHOOL

AND LIVE TO TELL THE TALE

NAT GEO WILD’S NEW SERIES VET SCHOOL GOES BEHIND THE SCENES AT ONE OF THE COUNTRY’S TOP VETERINARY SCHOOLS

Vet School Premieres Saturday, Sept. 19, 10/9c on Nat Geo WILD

(WASHINGTON, D.C. – July 15, 2015) Grab your stethoscope, leave your nerves at the door and step into the high-pressure, big-reward world at one of the top vet schools in the country, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. Nat Geo WILD has exclusive access to follow first-year students mastering the basics, and fourth-year students handling difficult cases from hamsters to horses. Will this cream-of-the-crop crew crack under the pressure of first injections, squirmy patients and animals they’ve never seen before? Vet School premieres Saturday, Sept. 19, at 10/9c on Nat Geo WILD (for more information on Vet School, visit www.natgeowild.com and follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/NGC_PR).

Now, it’s no secret that Nat Geo WILD loves veterinarians. Our No. 1 show is The Incredible Dr. Pol; last year we introduced ratings winner, Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER; and Dr. Oakley, Yukon Vet has been a network mainstay. Vet School brings us all the way back to the first step of a vet’s career, when they are overwhelmed every day with a mountain of information that they must digest, commit to memory and recall at a moment’s notice. What unites them all is a love for animals and a passionate desire to make a difference. These qualities are what make all of our vet shows must-watch TV, and Vet School is a natural extension of our success in the genre.

In medical school, students learn to care for one species. In Vet School, students train to care for hundreds. See for yourself the blood, sweat and tears it takes to become a top vet. . Students must quickly master tasks including restraining animals, repairing a bone fracture in a horse’s leg, inserting a pacemaker into a dog, and removing an abscess from a pet turkey. All in a day’s work.

Hannah Brodlie, Cristina Bustamante and Dan Cimino are first-year students who love animals and learning, but they are negotiating a steep learning curve on the road to becoming licensed vets. Hannah has worked in vet offices for years and wants nothing more than to be around animals all the time. Cristina is an international student from Colombia who looks forward to working with dogs day in and day out. Dan hopes to specialize in surgery. Singen Elliott, Aria Hill, and Aziza Glass are fourth-year students who are about to begin their professional careers. Aziza still struggles with her emotional investment in patients, Aria continues to work harder than ever before, and Singen dreams of becoming a large-animal surgeon.

Welcome to the world of Vet School, where students celebrate finishing an exam by sleeping an hour before studying for the next one. Good luck, students!

Premiere Vet School Episodes Include:

Vet School: Crash Course

Premieres Saturday, Sept. 19, 10/9c

First-year student Dan Cimino gets an in-depth introduction to the chaos of an ER. The evening begins slowly, but before long there are two serious emergencies. Fourth-year student Aria Hill is rewarded with some hands-on work during surgery to remove 10 teeth from a cat.Fourth-year studentSingen Eliott is schooled by an orthopedic surgeon who reminds him to treat the patient as the tiny kitten he is, not like one of Singen’s beloved horse patients.

Vet School: Day One

Premieres Saturday, Sept. 26, 10/9c

The first-year students are excited starting their veterinary school career but, much to their chagrin, they start by … dancing? Fourth-year student Singen Elliott loves large animals, but every veterinary student must rotate through small animals on their quest for a degree. Will Sophia the cat be his undoing? Finally, Millie, a 3-year-old bulldog, is in critical condition. She has congestive heart failure and has come to Cornell’s Companion Animal Hospital in a last-ditch effort to save her life. Fourth-year student Aziza Glass, in her first cardiology rotation, is part of the team that hopes to save Millie. Will this little bulldog make it through surgery?

Vet School: In Need of a Miracle

Premieres Saturday, Oct. 3, 10/9c

A patient comes in with a possible diagnosis of an aggressive form of cancer, but the final x-ray reveals something unusual. Fourth-year student Singen Elliott is working on Lewis, a dog with a suspected breathing issue. The problem is, when the docs try to get the dog to cough, they can’t seem to re-create the problem. Enter Singen, who is told to run Lewis around the hospital hallways to see if that works. Fourth-year student Aziza Glass’ rotation in large animal medicine has been fairly quiet, except for one vociferous miniature donkey named Leslie who is in for a general checkup. Seems simple enough, but Leslie has quite the mind of her own!

Vet School is produced by Thinkfactory Media for Nat Geo WILD. Thinkfactory Media executive vice president is Adam Reed, creative director is Adam Freeman, and executive producer is Lisa Tanzer. For Nat Geo WILD, executive producer is Jenny Apostol, senior vice president of development and production is Janet Han Vissering, and executive vice president and general manager is Geoff Daniels.

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 Ebola and pets: "It’s time to be cautious, but no time for panic”

 

​Can pets get sick from Ebola? Can they pass the virus to us? What should happen to the pets of infected people?

These questions came to the forefront this week when concerns were raised about what to do with the dog of an Ebola-infected nurse in Texas. While the dog has shown no signs of being infected, it is currently in quarantine as officials monitor its health. Earlier in the month, officials in Spain opted to euthanize a dog that may have been exposed to Ebola from an infected owner.

Dr. Ron DeHaven, CEO of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), said his organization is working with a number of veterinary and public health agencies and experts to develop protocols that veterinarians and other health officials can use to help guide their decisions on the handling and care of pets that may have been exposed to Ebola.

"There are lots of factors to consider, such as the type of animal and level of exposure," DeHaven said. "We want to make sure we create comprehensive, flexible protocols so veterinarians and health officials in all types of situations can use them to make the best decisions based on the evidence."

DeHaven said that there have been no reports of dogs or cats getting sick from Ebola, or of pets passing the virus to people or other animals, "but we are still taking precautions just in case."

He added, "It's time to be cautious, but no time for panic."

The Ebola virus was first discovered in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since that time, there have been sporadic outbreaks in Central Africa. Earlier this year, however, saw the start of the largest recorded outbreak of Ebola, this time in Western Africa. So far, three people have been diagnosed with Ebola in the United States.

Ebola is known to infect humans and non-human primates. Fruit bats, which don’t appear to be made ill from Ebola, may be a reservoir for the virus, passing it on directly or indirectly to humans and primates. While fruit bats in Africa can play a part in the spread of Ebola, there is no evidence that bats in North America can harbor the virus, nor is there any reason to believe they have been exposed to Ebola. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says such a situation is unlikely.

Symptoms of Ebola infection can occur anywhere from two to 21 days after infection and can include fever, headache, vomiting, and muscle pain. Ebola is a deadly disease, so if you believe you, someone you know, or your pet has been exposed to the Ebola virus, contact a physician or veterinarian immediately.

You can listen to the latest update on Ebola and pets on the AVMA’s website. You can find more information on Ebola at avma.org/Ebola.

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Important factors to consider for the protection of all family members

NEW YORK—In response to the recent spike in pet food recalls, the ASPCA®’s (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) Animal Poison Control Center has some suggestions on how to best keep two-legged and four-legged family members safe:

• Do your research. Salmonella is the contaminant that appears to be the cause of concern during this most recent round of pet food recalls. The most important thing for pet owners to do if they suspect their dog’s food has been contaminated is to stop feeding their pet the recalled food immediately. If the pet shows signs of illness after eating a recalled pet food, a trip to the vet should be first on the list of to-dos, and then the food manufacturer should be notified. Pet owners can identify the recalled foods by visiting the FDA’s website at www.fda.gov.

• Know the signs. While healthy adult dogs are relatively resistant to illness from Salmonella bacteria, pets with health issues (such as young puppies, elderly and pregnant dogs that could have compromised immune systems) may be at greater risk for becoming ill. Dogs who are affected by Salmonella may exhibit symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, fever, lethargy, and drooling or panting—an indication of nausea. In severe cases, the bacterium may spread throughout the body resulting in death.

• Clean is key. Salmonella isn’t only dangerous to the pet eating the food, but could also affect the pet parent serving the food. Salmonella can be spread through direct contact with the affected product and animal feces, so exposure should be avoided. The best way to protect family members, including other animals in the home, is to thoroughly wash your hands (or paws) after any dealings with the product or feces. In addition, all bowls, utensils and surfaces that may have come in contact with contaminated food should be washed using hot soapy water and rinsed thoroughly or sanitized in the dishwasher.

For more information about the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center and potential pet toxins, visit www.aspca.org/apcc.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org. To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to www.twitter.com/aspca.

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