Displaying items by tag: grants

The American Kennel Club (AKC), AKC Canine Health Foundation (AKCCHF), and Theriogenology Foundation (TF) are pleased to announce that Auburn University, The Ohio State University, and the University of Pennsylvania have been selected through a competitive grant application process to receive residency program funding in 2022 through the AKC/AKCCHF/TF Small Animal Theriogenology Residency Program.

This program has provided funding to train more than 12 veterinary specialists in theriogenology and clinical genetics since it started in 2014. Theriogenology is the branch of veterinary medicine concerned with reproduction - including the physiology and pathology of male and female reproductive systems, and the clinical practice of veterinary obstetrics, gynecology, and andrology. Providing support for training in companion animal reproductive medicine and surgery, canine clinical genetics, health research, and clinical practice ensures that specialists will be available to address the health needs of current and future generations of dogs.

This is the third AKC/AKCCHF/TF Small Animal Theriogenology Residency funded at Auburn University where residents have the unique opportunity to manage the reproductive medicine needs of the university’s Canine Performance Sciences (CPS) Program in addition to case management through the teaching hospital. CPS maintains an active canine breeding program with a focus on elite, purpose-bred detection dogs.

This is also the third AKC/AKCCHF/TF Small Animal Theriogenology Residency funded at The Ohio State University. This two-year program provides training, mentorship, and support for residents, helping them become advocates for responsible purebred dog ownership and reproduction.

This is the second AKC/AKCCHF/TF Small Animal Theriogenology Residency funded at the University of Pennsylvania. Residents here have an opportunity for involvement with the PennVet Working Dog Center (PVWDC) and the development of a National Working Dog Breeding Co-op (NWDBC) in addition to their duties at the teaching hospital.

“The AKC Canine Health Foundation and its donors are proud to support the training of specialists in reproductive medicine and clinical genetics,” says J. Charles Garvin, MD, FACS, Chairman of the AKCCHF Board of Directors. “We know that these specialists are valuable partners in responsible dog breeding and the appropriate use of genetic health testing. Our continued collaboration will truly benefit many generations of dogs and their owners.”

“The AKC, AKC Canine Health Foundation, and the Theriogenology Foundation value this joint commitment to companion animal reproductive health as an invaluable tool for training the next generation to advance the health of purebred, purpose bred dogs, and establishing positive working relationships with breeders,” says Mari-Beth O’Neill, Vice President of Sport Services at the American Kennel Club.

"The residencies provided by AKC, AKCCHF and the Theriogenology Foundation provide a vital opportunity for top level training and education in canine reproduction,” says Dr. Mike Thompson, President of the Theriogenology Foundation. “Through these residencies, more highly trained veterinarians are available for purebred, purpose bred dogs and their owners.  The Theriogenology Foundation is very appreciative of this collaboration to train expert level reproduction veterinarians."

AKCCHF also offers educational grants to encourage the next generation of veterinary scientists. In addition to the AKC/AKCCHF/TF Small Animal Theriogenology Residency Program, they award Clinician-Scientist Fellowships for those pursuing a career in canine health research. Funding for the AKC/AKCCHF/TF Small Animal Theriogenology Residency Program has been extended through 2023. To learn more and support the program, visit www.akcchf.org/therio


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About the AKC Canine Health Foundation

Since 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science to address the health needs of all dogs. With more than $62 million in funding to date, the Foundation provides grants for the highest quality canine health research and shares information on the discoveries that help prevent, treat and cure canine diseases. The Foundation meets and exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, as demonstrated by their highest four-star Charity Navigator rating and GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency. Learn more at www.akcchf.org.

News Release
For Immediate Release

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (February 27, 2017) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce that it has awarded the first research grant through the Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium (CBTC). The CBTC was launched at the National Institutes of Health by a group of clinicians and investigators in the fields of veterinary and human neuro-oncology, clinical trials, neuropathology, and drug development.

Participants in the CBTC evaluated the role that naturally occurring canine brain tumors could have in advancing comparative oncology aimed at improving outcomes for canine and human patients with brain cancer. The findings of the CBTC were published in a white paper, “Creation of an NCI comparative brain tumor consortium: informing the translation of new knowledge from canine to human brain tumor patients.” The AKC Canine Health Foundation, committed to this effort, has awarded the first research grant through this consortium, Clinical Trial of Procaspase-3 Activator (PAC-1) in Combination with Hydroxyurea for Treatment of Canine Meningioma, led by principal investigator, Dr. Timothy M. Fan, DVM, PhD from the University of Illinois.

“The National Cancer Institute is thrilled to partner with the academic community, with the generous support of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, to conduct the inaugural clinical trial of the Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium,” said Amy LeBlanc, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM (Oncology), Director, Comparative Oncology Program.  “In this effort we bring together unique and cutting-edge technology, knowledge and clinical expertise to evaluate a novel therapeutic and diagnostic approach to canine meningioma.”

Primary brain tumors are a significant cause of illness and death in pet dogs, with meningioma accounting for approximately half of the cases seen by veterinary neurologists and oncologists. Although surgery remains the best treatment for dogs with meningioma, some dogs are not good candidates for this approach based on their tumor size and/or location. Dogs also may experience tumor regrowth after surgery. In these situations, effective treatment options are limited. New treatments that are both safe and effective are needed for dogs with meningioma.

Dr. Fan and a team of investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Comparative Oncology Program and selected veterinary academic centers will work together using state-of-the art imaging and a novel therapeutic approach for dogs with meningioma that are good surgical candidates. Dogs enrolled in this study will receive an investigational combination of chemotherapy agents (PAC-1 + hydroxyurea) and will be monitored with magnetic resonance and non-invasive molecular imaging techniques. Dogs will then undergo tumor removal to further their treatment. This approach to a new therapy for dogs has the potential to also translate to treatments for humans with advanced, locally-recurrent, and/or non-resectable meningioma.

According to Dr. Fan, "The National Cancer Institute’s Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium, through the generous support of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, has a unique opportunity to investigate a combination of novel advanced imaging techniques in conjunction with new therapies for dogs with meningioma. It is hoped that the findings derived from this new study will generate important data on how canine meningioma can be monitored non-invasively with molecular imaging, and if combining cytotoxic agents with a procaspase-3 activating compound can produce measurable anticancer effects."

Dr. Diane Brown, CEO of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, and one of the co-authors of the original CBTC summary paper, says, “This first project is a way toward a future to advance care for dogs and humans who share environments, and diseases such as brain tumors. By working together through studies such as this one, we leverage the strengths of veterinary and human medicine and research to seek opportunities for new paths to cure diseases shared by both species.”

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (July 25, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, announces a second round of new grants awarded through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative. This comprehensive Initiative addresses important health concerns that include Lyme disease, bartonellosis, and ehrlichiosis, through much-needed research in diagnostics, disease pathogenesis and prevalence.

Edward B. Breitschwerdt, DVM, DACVIM, of North Carolina State University, will study “Enhanced Testing for the Diagnosis of Bartonellosis in Dogs.” Bartonellosis is a potentially life-threatening zoonotic disease distributed throughout the world by approximately ten different Bartonella bacteria species. Bartonella bacteria are transmitted to dogs and humans by ticks, fleas, lice, mites, and sand flies. Due to a lack of sensitive and reliable diagnostic tests, definitive diagnosis of bartonellosis in dogs remains a significant problem. Because these bacteria invade cells and infect tissues throughout the body, this chronic intracellular infection is difficult to cure with currently used antibiotic regimens. Dr. Breitschwerdt and his team aim to develop improved blood tests for bartonellosis in dogs that can also be used for world-wide sero-epidemiological prevalence studies, and to establish early and accurate diagnosis.

Pedro Paul Diniz, DVM, PhD, of Western University of Health Sciences, will study “Broad-Range Detection of Canine Tick-Borne Disease and Improved Diagnostics Using Next-Generation Sequencing.” Currently available tests for vector-borne diseases in dogs rely on previously known DNA sequences of each pathogen, with little room for detecting new or emerging organisms. This results in false negatives for tick-borne diseases, leaving veterinarians and dog owners frustrated by a lack of definitive diagnosis. Using an innovative approach, Dr. Diniz and team will employ next-generation sequencing (NGS) to overcome the limitations of current diagnostic technology. Testing samples from dogs naturally exposed to tick-borne diseases, NGS will detect not only new organisms but also characterize genetic differences among known organisms. The resulting dataset of a large number of DNA sequences of known tick-borne organisms and previously undetected organisms in naturally-infected dogs will support the development of diagnostic tools to simultaneously advance canine and human health.

In addition to these two new grants, earlier this year the AKC Canine Health Foundation awarded three grants through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative. The three grants address Lyme disease, vector-borne disease testing for canine blood donors, and ehrlichiosis. 

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs, and individuals who are committed to the betterment of canine health through scientific research. During 2016, all donations to the Tick-Borne Disease Initiative are being matched dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club (up to $250,000). Make an impact and double your donation today: www.akcchf.org/ticks.  

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 
Grey Muzzle Organization Grants $225K in Funding for Senior Dog Programs at 38 Organizations Nationwide
 
RALEIGH, N.C.--Senior pups have something to wag about this week, as the national nonprofit The Grey Muzzle Organization announces the recipients of its annual grants for animal welfare organizations providing programs for at-risk senior dogs. Thirty-eight organizations representing 25 states will receive over $225,000 in funding from the group in 2016 to support services, including hospice care for senior dogs who are not adoptable, “Senior for Senior” adoption programs, and medical and dental care. Since 2008, Grey Muzzle has provided over $750,000 in grants to 76 nonprofit organizations in 30 states in support of its “vision of a world where no old dog dies alone and afraid.”
 
“The Grey Muzzle Organization was with Muttville Senior Dog Rescue from the very beginning,” says Sherri Franklin, Executive Director of Muttville, another 2016 grantee. “Without their support we wouldn’t be where we are today, saving more senior dogs than ever!”
 
This year’s Grey Muzzle Organization grantees include:
  • Tyson's Place Animal Rescue, a Michigan organization dedicated to helping terminally ill people care for--and ultimately, find homes for--beloved pets like Bosco, a 14-year-old rat terrier mix currently up for adoption.

 

  • Rainbow Friends Animal Sanctuary on theBig Island of Hawaii, where dogs like 13-year-old Pono, who recently found his forever home, are treated to therapeutic swimming pool visits as part of their medical care.
  • Austin Pug Rescue, where the breed’s special medical needs are a priority. 11-year-old Ebenezer, who had to have all of his teeth removed due to severe periodontal disease, is now feeling fresh-mouthed and fine!

“One of the most gratifying parts of our work is getting to hear success stories about second chances for dogs in their golden years,” says The Grey Muzzle Organization Executive Director Lisa Lunghofer. “We’re thrilled to help so many deserving organizations give senior dogs the happy endings they deserve.”
 
A complete list of Grey Muzzle’s 2016 grantees, including videos and photos, is available at www.greymuzzle.org and upon request.
 
The national nonprofit The Grey Muzzle Organization improves the lives of at-risk senior dogs by providing funding and resources to animal shelters, rescue organizations, sanctuaries, and other non-profit groups nationwide.

 

ASPCA Rescuing Racers Initiative has granted over $2 million to protect former racehorses from
being sent to slaughter

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced that it has granted $200,000 to 18 equine rescue groups across the country to assist their efforts to rescue and rehabilitate retired racehorses. The grants were awarded as part of the ASPCA Rescuing Racers Initiative, a major grants program that launched in 2010 and provides funding for equine rescues and sanctuaries that protect retired racers by offering alternatives to slaughter. Now in its seventh year, the program has awarded over $2 million to retired racers to prepare them for life after their racing careers come to an end.

“The ASPCA Rescuing Racers Initiative allows us to provide much-needed grant funding to the many equine rescue groups around the country who provide critical resources to former racehorses, offering them medical rehabilitation, re-training or sanctuary to prevent them from being sent to slaughter,” said Jacque Schultz, senior director of the ASPCA Equine Fund. “Their racing careers may have ended, but these retirees still have much to offer as they transition into new and varied careers – a process that requires significant time and resources.”

Selected recipients include a wide range of equine rescues from 12 states, who will each be awarded a grant ranging from $5,000–$24,000, to help the groups increase their capacity for rescuing more horses. The organizations joining the list of rescues and sanctuaries as part of the ASPCA Rescuing Racers Initiative for 2016 are:

  • After the Homestretch, Ariz.
  • CANTER/National
  • CANTER, Mich.
  • CANTER, OH
  • The Exceller Fund Inc., Ky.
  • Foxie G Foundation Inc., Md.
  • Friends of Ferdinand, Ind.
  • Kentucky Equine Humane Center Inc., Ky.
  • Makers Mark Secretariat Center, Ky.
  • MidAtlantic Horse Rescue, Inc., Md.
  • Neigh Savers Foundation Inc., Calif.
  • New Vocations Racehorse Adoption Program, Ky. and OH
  • Old Friends Inc., Ky.
  • Racer Placers, Wis.
  • ReRun Inc., N.Y.
  • Safe Harbor Equine and Livestock Sanctuary, Tenn.
  • Standardbred Retirement Foundation, N.J.
  • Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance, Ky.

In 2015, the ASPCA awarded over $1 million in grants to support 124 equine rescues and sanctuaries across the country. The grant money supported several areas of equine welfare including large-scale rehabilitation, emergency relief grants, safety net programs, and ASPCA Help a Horse Day, a nationwide grants competition of equine rescues and sanctuaries that is designed to raise awareness about the year-round lifesaving work they do to care for local at-risk horses who’ve been abused, neglected or find themselves homeless.

Horses have been central to the ASPCA mission since the organization’s founding 150 years ago. The ASPCA’s efforts to further equine protection include supporting equine welfare through legislation, public advocacy, professional development, horse rescue and targeted grants. Most recently the ASPCA launched a broad “Adopt a Horse” public service campaign featuring “2 Broke Girls” actress and horse advocate Beth Behrs and her rescue horse Belle, to encourage potential horse owners to make adoption their first option. The campaign highlights the many benefits of adopting a horse from one of the nation’s hundreds of equine rescue groups. It also aims to connect the many horses in need of permanent homes with the 2.3 million Americans who, according to a recent survey, say they have adequate space, resources, and strong interest in adopting a horse.

To learn more about the ASPCA, please visit www.aspca.org.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, and celebrating its 150th birthday this year, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (June 16, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, announces the first round of new grants awarded through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative.

Jason Stull, VMD, PhD, of The Ohio State University will study “Lyme Disease in Dogs: Prevalence, Clinical Illness, and Prognosis.” Lyme disease is a bacterial disease transmitted by tick bites. In people, Lyme is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the US, with over 25,000 cases in 2014. Dogs infected with Lyme disease may not show signs of illness, but underlying impact can be severe. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Lyme disease in dogs is complicated by limited research and conflicting professional guidance. Following a large group of dogs from different regions of the United States and Canada, the investigators will broaden the understanding of canine Lyme disease by identifying and defining best practices for prevention and control of Lyme disease in areas with different Lyme risks, ultimately improving the health of dogs and their people.

Linda Kidd, DVM, PhD, Western University of Health Sciences, and her team will study “Thrombocytopenia and Occult Vector-Borne Disease in Greyhound Dogs: Implications for Clinical Cases and Blood Donors.” Retired racing Greyhounds are common blood donors for dogs requiring blood transfusions. Low platelet (thrombocytopenia) and white blood cell counts are considered normal findings in Greyhounds, as is protein in their urine. Because vector-borne disease pathogens can cause chronic, clinically silent infection, the researchers hypothesize that infection occurs in, and contributes to blood and urine abnormalities in some healthy-appearing retired racing Greyhounds. This study will compare the prevalence of vector-borne diseases in retired racing Greyhounds and show-bred Greyhounds, and will investigate whether blood and urine abnormalities occur with the same frequency in these two lines of Greyhounds. The results will help veterinarians decide when to pursue infectious disease testing, while also informing best practices for screening canine blood donors.

Mary Anna Thrall, DVM, MS of Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine and her team will investigate “The Role of Lymphocytes in Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis (CME),” an important tick-borne disease in dogs caused by the pathogen, Ehrlichia canis. In an effort to understand the variable severity of the disease amongst dogs, the team will study the role and types of lymphocytes present in Ehrlichia-positive dogs to determine if increased lymphocyte counts and a large number of genetically identical lymphocytes are associated with disease severity. The findings from this study will help advance the understanding of the pathophysiology and accurate diagnosis of canine ehrlichiosis and lymphocytosis.

“This first round of funding through the AKC Canine Health Foundation’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative shows promising research to address important tick-borne diseases affecting dogs,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF chief executive officer. “We are excited about the impact this Initiative will have on canine health and owner awareness of the growing concern over important tick-borne pathogens.”

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs, and individuals who are committed to the betterment of canine health through scientific research. During 2016, all donations to the Tick-Borne Disease Initiative are being matched dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club (up to $250,000). Make an impact and double your donation today: www.akcchf.org/ticks.  

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 

The Pets in the Classroom grant program is able to provide 60 teachers with funding to purchase classroom pets thanks to money raised during America’s Family Pet Expo.

The Pet Care Trust is pleased to announce that 60 teachers will be receiving Pets in the Classroom Grants thanks to a donation through the World Pet Association (WPA), Hikari Sales USA, and other pet-related businesses.  Nearly $6,200 was raised for the Pets in the Classroom grant program at the WPA’s April 22-24, 2016 America’s Family Pet Expo in Orange County, California. The money raised will fund 60 teacher grants, allowing 2,500 students to experience the benefits of interacting with pets in the school setting.

https://us.vocuspr.com/Publish/1193095/vcsPRAsset_1193095_119235_89040fae-3b4e-48d2-8307-a02fbc358f85_0.jpgThe Expo, which is known for its notable history of placing animals in forever homes and educating people on responsible pet care, featured a Betta Fish Toss booth in which attendees had the opportunity to win a betta fish by throwing a ping pong ball into cups of water.  Aquatic Companies Dolphin, Estes, and Hikari Sales USA, Inc. all donated products for the Betta Toss while Hikari Sales USA President and Pet Care Trust Board member Chris Clevers also spent the weekend helping at the booth.

"The Pet Care Trust sincerely appreciates the tremendous support that the World Pet Association and Chris Clevers have provided to the Pets in the Classroom program,” said Steven T. King, Executive Director for the Pet Care Trust.  “Thanks to their efforts and the donations made by Dolphin, Estes, and Hikari USA Sales, Inc., thousands of kids will be able to experience the joys of a classroom pet as a result. The support of those in the pet industry have been instrumental in the continued growth of this wonderful program.”

Clevers has been instrumental in raising funds for the grant program at the annual Expo since 2011.  His dedication to the program is evident in his and his wife’s donation of time and products to fundraising efforts, and in his involvement in the Pet Care Trust board.  Clevers commented:

“We feel this program is extremely important to teachers and their students as it allows children to interact with animals and reconnect with nature while providing firsthand experience developing responsibility and compassion as well as helping the teachers with daily lesson plans designed around the animals. No program in the pet industry does more to foster pet parents of the future than Pets in the Classroom. We’re pleased we could support such a worthwhile and important program. We only wish more companies in our industry would join us.”

The Pets in the Classroom program was established by the Pet Care Trust to assist teachers in obtaining or maintaining classroom pets. The Pets in the Classroom program benefits students by teaching them responsible, long-term pet care at an early age and providing the psychological and developmental benefits associated with the human-animal bond.  Studies have shown that caring for pets has a positive effect on children, improving school attendance and teaching children responsibility, as well as encouraging nurturing and building self-esteem.

For more information on the World Pet Association and its events, visit www.WorldPetAssociation.org, or for more information on the Pet Care Trust and its Pets in the Classroom grant program, visit www.petsintheclassroom.org.

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ASPCA #HelpAHorse contest will award $100,000 in grant prizes to equine organizations across the country

New research shows at least 2.3 million Americans have a strong interest in adopting a horse

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced the participants in its third annual ASPCA Help a Horse Day grants contest. The nationwide competition of equine rescues and sanctuaries is designed to raise awareness about the year-round lifesaving work they do to care for local at-risk horses who’ve been abused, neglected or find themselves homeless. In honor of the ASPCA’s 150th Anniversary celebration this month, the ASPCA has teamed up with “2 Broke Girls” actress and horse advocate Beth Behrs to spread the word about the contest, which has been expanded to include a total of $100,000 in grant prizes. This year, 191 groups will be hosting events across 42 states during the weekend of April 22-24 as they compete to win a grand prize of $25,000.

“The ASPCA Help a Horse Day contest has grown exponentially over the past few years, and we are excited to celebrate our 150th anniversary by providing even more grants to the dedicated equine rescues and sanctuaries that step in to care for abused or neglected horses and give them a much-deserved new lease on life,” said Jacque Schultz, senior director of the ASPCA Equine Fund. “We are proud to welcome Beth Behrs to the contest this year and we applaud her efforts to raise awareness about wonderful horses available for adoption around the country.”

“I recently adopted my horse, Belle, from a California sanctuary, where I was able to see firsthand the tireless efforts that go into rehabilitating and caring for at-risk horses,” said Behrs. “It’s inspiring to see the creative events being planned around the country in celebration of the ASPCA Help A Horse Day contest, and I am honored to lend my voice to equine protection and to help recognize these everyday heroes for their life-saving work.”

Participating rescue groups will be judged on the creativity of their events, as well as their ability to engage their local communities to assist their efforts to protect horses. Activities include open houses, education and volunteer programs, birthday parties, spring festivals, scavenger hunts and other fun-filled events. ASPCA Help a Horse Day is celebrated annually on April 26 – a date chosen for its significance to the ASPCA’s long history of horse protection. In 1866, ASPCA founder Henry Bergh stopped a cart driver from beating his horse, resulting in the first successful arrest for horse mistreatment on April 26 of that year. The protection of horses has been a core part of the ASPCA mission ever since, which includes supporting equine welfare legislation, advocacy, rescue and targeted grants.

Coinciding with Help a Horse Day events, the ASPCA has unveiled the results of a recent nationwide survey showing that at least 2.3 million Americans have adequate space, resources, and a strong interest in adopting a horse. This new data suggests that there are more than enough homes available for the approximately 125,000 American horses shipped to Canada and Mexico last year to be slaughtered for human consumption.

“For anyone considering adopting a horse or donkey, there’s no better time than an ASPCA Help a Horse Day event to see what the nation’s equine rescues have to offer,” added Schultz. “The strong public sentiment against horse slaughter, combined with the significant lack of awareness that this is a problem horses face, underscores how community events like ASPCA Help A Horse Day are critical to pairing horses in need with the homes that are available.”

Last year, the ASPCA awarded over $1 million in grants to support 124 equine rescues and sanctuaries across the country. The grant money supported several areas of equine welfare including large-scale rehabilitation, emergency relief grants, safety net programs, and the Rescuing Racers Initiative, which aids in the rescue and rehabilitation of retired racehorses to save them from slaughter.

For more information about ASPCA Help a Horse Day or to see if there is an event near you, please visit www.aspca.org/helpahorse.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, and celebrating its 150th birthday this year, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (February 4, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, announces that 30 grants have been awarded in 2015 to researchers studying canine disease. These grants, totaling nearly $1.5 million, will continue to build on CHF-funded advances in veterinary medicine and biomedical science, impacting both canine and human health.

“The projects funded this year are a combination of innovative science and technology, and studies to address the immediate and practical medical needs of all dogs,” according to Dr. Diane Brown, CHF’s chief executive officer. “Research ranges from heritable disease, reproductive health, cancer and infectious disease, and includes projects to understand the needs and health of working dog populations, all with an emphasis on better health for dogs and their people.”

CHF administers annual health polls to provide real-time data on the concerns of dog owners and on unmet areas of need in veterinary medicine. Using this information, projects are chosen to build on the depth and breadth of CHF’s 20-year history of health research for dogs. Each grant awarded has specific aims to fill critical knowledge gaps in veterinary medicine, leading to better care options for both the common and the complex health issues of dogs. CHF also invests in training the next generation of scientists to address the health needs of dogs through its Clinician-Scientist Fellowship Program, awarding three Fellowships in 2016.

True to CHF’s mission, several of the newly awarded grants have a One Health emphasis where outcomes of the research project have the potential to benefit human, as well as canine health. One such example is the study of dogs with respiratory and skin diseases that live in the homes of children with asthma. Findings from this study will help unlock the complexities of these health conditions in both species.

CHF is committed to canine cancer research, and one such example is the funding of a $432,000 grant to better understand and prevent hemangiosarcoma, an aggressive and deadly form of cancer in dogs. This grant, awarded to Dr. Jaime Modiano, VMD, PhD, professor at the University of Minnesota, joins the American Boxer Charitable Foundation, the Golden Retriever Foundation, and the Portuguese Water Dog Foundation, thus emphasizing the impact CHF donors have in advancing collaborative research.

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs and individuals who are committed to canine health research. Dog lovers are encouraged to make a donation to support healthy dogs by visiting www.akcchf.org.

The complete portfolio of new grants for 2015 can be downloaded in PDF format. Or, view and search all active and past grants in CHF’s full grant portfolio

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About the AKC Canine Health Foundation

For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases impacting all dogs while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 

As part of 8th annual Subaru Share the Love Event, the ASPCA and Subaru 
provide grant funding for nationwide animal transports, adoption events

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced the launch of the third year of the ASPCA & Subaru Share the Love Event “Rescue Ride” grant program.The grant program helps transport thousands of homeless dogs from overcrowded shelters to shelters in areas where they have a better chance of being adopted. Thanks to funding from the annual Share the Love Event, the program will grant a total of $189,000 in funding to 49 organizations to cover transportation costs.  

This is the eighth consecutive year that the ASPCA will be a beneficiary of the Subaru Share the Love Event. In addition to the “Rescue Ride” program, this year, the ASPCA has used these donations to distribute over $150,000 in grants to 45 local animal welfare organizations to host pet adoption-related events at local Subaru retailers to save lives and raise awareness for animals in need.

“With Subaru’s support, we are helping relocate thousands of animals to improve their chances of finding safe and loving homes, and supporting many others through dedicated events and programs,” said ASPCA President & CEO Matthew Bershadker. “This partnership makes a huge difference in the lives of vulnerable animals -- but also for individuals, families, and communities across America who benefit from the love and companionship pets so eagerly provide.”

As part of the Share the Love event – which ran from November 19, 2015 through January 2, 2016 – Subaru donates $250 for every new Subaru vehicle purchased or leased to the customer’s choice of participating charities, including the ASPCA. Subaru will give up to $15,000,000 in total, with a minimum donation of $250,000 to each of the four national charities.

ASPCA & Subaru Share the Love Event “Rescue Ride” Grant Recipients are:

Aiding Shelter Animals Project (McComb, Miss.)
Alamo Rescue Friends (San Antonio, Texas)
All Satos Rescue (San Juan, Puerto Rico)
Animal Allies Humane Society (Duluth, Minn.)
Animal Relief and Rescue Fellowship (Leland, Miss.)
Animal Welfare Association Incorporated (Voorhees, N.J.)
Berkshire Humane Society Inc. (Pittsfield, Mass.)
Blackwell Animal Rescue Center (BARC) (Southaven, Miss.)
Camden County Animal Shelter  (Blackwood, N.J.)
Capital Area Humane Society (Hilliard, Ohio)
City of Corpus Christi Animal Care Services (Corpus Christi, Texas)
Colorado Animal Rescue Inc. (Glenwood Springs, Colo.)
Connecticut Humane Society (Newington, Conn.)
Darlington County Humane Society, Inc. (Darlington, S.C.)
Fort Collins Cat Rescue & Spay/Neuter Clinic (Fort Collins, Colo.)
Friends 4 Pound Paws (Gouverneur, N.Y.)
Friends of Homeless Animals, Inc. (North Kingstown, R.I.)
Greenhill Humane Society (Eugene, Ore.)
Homeward Bound Waggin, Inc.  (Quincy, Ill.)
Humane Society of Cherokee County (Tahlequah, Okla.)
Humane Society of Dover Stewart County Incorporated (Indian Mound, Tenn.)
Humane Society of Jefferson County (Jefferson City, Tenn.)
Humane Society of Lincoln County (Fayetteville, Tenn.)
Husky House, Inc. (Matawan, N.J.)
Idaho Humane Society, Inc. (Boise, Idaho)
Johnson County Animal Control (Franklin, Ind.)
Kauai Humane Society (Lihue, Hawaii)
Kentucky Humane Society (Louisville, Ky.)
Laguna Madre Humane Society  (Port Isabel, Texas)
Little Guild of Saint Francis (West Cornwall, Conn.)
Lucky Dog Animal Rescue (Arlington, Va.)
Nate's Honor Animal Rescue (Bradenton, Fla.)
National Great Pyrenees Rescue (Maplecrest, N.Y.)
Nevada Humane Society, Inc. (Reno, Nev.)
No Paws Left Behind (Bakersfield, Calif.)
Peaceful Animal Adoption Shelter, Inc. (Vinita, Okla.)
Prairie Paws Animal Shelter, Inc. (Ottawa, Kan.)
Rock County Humane Society (Janesville, Wis.)
Santa Fe Animal Shelter, Inc. (Santa Fe, N.M.)
Shenandoah Valley Animal Services Center (Lyndhurst, Va.)
South Ogden Animal Services (South Ogden, Utah)
SPCA of Texas (Dallas, Texas)
Stafford Animal Shelter (Livingston, Mont.)
TAILS Humane Society  (DeKalb, Ill.)
The Animal Refuge League of Greater Portland (Westbrook, Maine)
The Delta Humane Society of Louisiana  (Rayville, La.)
The Humane Society of Jackson County, Inc. (Sylva, N.C.)
Vanderburgh Humane Society, Inc. (Evansville, Ind.)
Wharton County Stray Pet Outreach Team (Wharton, Texas)

About the ASPCA®

Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

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