Displaying items by tag: extinction

image.jpeg LOOK OUT… IT’S DINOMAYNIA!!!! NAT GEO’S FIRST ANNUAL MONTH -LONG CELEBRATION OF DINOSAURS Dinosaurs may be extinct, but they never go extinct with kids. While these huge dangerous reptiles disappeared from the earth over 65 million years ago, they are still very much alive in the imagination of countless toddlers and kids. Vertebrate paleontologist and dinosaur expert, Nizar Ibrahim shares his love of these fascinating creatures. He has scoured the deserts of North Africa for clues to life in the Cretaceous period, when the area was a large river system teeming with a profusion of diverse life. His team has unearthed giant dinosaur bones and footprints as well as remains of prehistoric fishes, crocodile-like predators, and giant flying reptiles. He is renowned for his decades long work tracing Spinosaurus, one of the most unusual dinosaurs yet found: a predator that was longer from snout to tail than an adult T.rex, and that had a six-foot tall sail on its back. Ibrahim’s multi-disciplinary research projects shed light on a period of major changes for our planet including extreme climate fluctuations and the breakup of the supercontinent. Join world renowned paleontologist Nizar Ibrahim on international Dinosaur Day, May 18th as he discusses everything dinosaur. He will answer questions like: · Why do dinosaurs continue to capture the imagination of kids around the world? What makes them so appealing? · What is International Dinosaur Day and DINOMAYNIA? How can we learn more? · Can you share some of the new science that is changing older theories about how dinosaurs looked, moved and lived? · What can you tell us about Spinosaurus? I understand they were partial to water. · What does it feel like to unearth dinosaur bones from the earth? · What does it mean to be a National Geographic Explorer? Join Nat Geo Kids for an entertaining, fun-filled exploration of our favorite prehistoric creatures by visiting the DinoMAYnia web hub (www.natgeokids.com/dinomania), or by checking out our incredible selection of dinosaur books (http://natgeodinomania.com/). Follow along on Twitter and Facebook at @NatGeoBooks as we share weekly Dino Dispatches and fascinating trivia. Parents can visit our Reimagining Dinosaurs content hub for more fascinating stories about dinosaurs, including some of the latest dinosaur discoveries that are changing the way we understand dinosaurs, from the way they looked to the way they lived. ABOUT - Nizar Ibrahim is a vertebrate paleontologist and comparative anatomist with a background in the bio-and geosciences and a Ph.D. in vertebrate paleontology. His teaching and research affiliations include the University of Detroit Mercy, the Carnegie Museum of Natural History (Pittsburgh, PA) and the University of Portsmouth (UK). Over the last decade, he has reached millions of people around the globe via speaking tours, exhibits, educational videos, books, and scientific literacy projects for young people. Ibrahim and his discoveries have been widely featured in National Geographic magazine, most recently in Reimagining Dinosaurs, and in Nature, Science, the Wall Street Journal, Discover, and many other major national publications.

Bas Huijbregts

African Species Director, Wildlife Conservation Program

Bas Huijbregts
Media inquiries: News And Press Page
 

Bas leads WWF’s work on wildlife conservation in Africa, focusing primarily on elephants, great apes, and rhinos. The most exciting part of protecting these charismatic, flagship species is that by protecting those, the protected areas and wider ecosystems on which they depend are also protected. His work entails landscape planning, protected area management, law enforcement, community-based natural resource management, and the monitoring of species populations over time and space. Given the current poaching crisis on the continent, a particular focus is given to reinforcing protection efforts in WWF’s priority landscapes and fighting wildlife crime.

Bas first started working in Africa in 1996 doing large mammal and socio-economic baseline surveys. These surveys laid the foundation for the creation of the 3,700 sq. mile Minkebe National Park, one of the last strongholds for the African forest elephant.

From there, Bas led the Gamba program along the coast of Gabon, home to the world’s most important nesting site for leatherback turtles, surfing hippos and elephants on the beach, followed by positions as conservation director for Gabon and for the Central Africa region. Before joining his wife in the US in 2014, he led the joint WWF/TRAFFIC Central Africa wildlife crime initiative based out of Yaounde, Cameroon.

With the last male ailing, the northern white rhino is almost gone

In this July 28, 2017, photo, wildlife ranger Zachariah Mutai takes care of Sudan, the world's last male northern white rhino, at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia county in Kenya.
(Joe Mwihia / Associated Press)

The beleaguered northern white rhinoceros moved closer to extinction this week after conservationists announced that the health of the only surviving male of the species was deteriorating.

The rhino, named Sudan, made headlines last year after it was dubbed “The Most Eligible Bachelor in the World” on the dating app Tinder as part of a campaign to spread awareness about rhinos and raise money to help protect them.

But now Sudan’s days appear to be numbered.

He was “starting to show signs of ailing,” according to a statement posted Wednesday on Twitter by the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, the preserve in Kenya where the 45-year-old rhino has lived since 2009. “His health has begun deteriorating, and his future is not looking bright.”

“We are very concerned about him — he’s extremely old for a rhino and we do not want him to suffer unnecessarily,” it said. White rhinos live until around 40 on average, though those being cared for in captivity can survive longer.

Sudan developed “an uncomfortable age-related infection on his back right leg” at the end of 2017, the conservancy said. A team of veterinarians from around the world assessed the animal, which responded well to treatment and began to heal, soon resuming normal movement and foraging habits.

But recently, a secondary and much deeper infection was discovered beneath the initial one and Sudan was taking longer to recover, “despite the best efforts of his team of vets who are giving him 24-hour care,” the organization said.

There are two other white rhinos left in the world — a female named Najin and daughter Fatu, both also living at the conservancy in Kenya. Health problems or their ages — around 28 and 17, respectively — have left them unable to reproduce.

Wildlife experts and conservationists expressed deep regret over the prospect of the northern white rhino completely dying out. Technically, the species is already classified as extinct because it no longer exists in the wild, conservationists said.

“This is a distinct lineage of white rhino,” said Barbara Durrant, director of reproductive sciences at San Diego Zoo Global. “The loss of a population, especially of a mega-vertebrate like a rhino … is a significant loss in terms of genetic diversity.”

The zoo had had eight northern white rhinos in its Safari Park near Escondido over the years since 1972. The last one, a female named Nola, died in 2015.

This 1996 file photo shows northern white rhinos at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. Between 1972 and 2015, when the last one died, the zoo hosted eight northern white rhinos.
(Bob Grieser / Los Angeles Times )

All types of rhino are threatened. No more than 26,543 are left in Africa, and no more than 163 in Southeast Asia, along with at least 3,500 in other parts of Asia, according to Save the Rhino, a conservation charity based in Britain.

Poaching is the main cause of the decline and disappearance of rhinos from the wild. They are hunted for their horns, which are trafficked primarily in China and Vietnam for such uses as cures for illness.

More than 7,245 African rhinos have been lost to poaching over the last decade, including 1,028 last year in South Africa, according to Save the Rhino.

The poaching danger is often coupled with degradation and loss of habitat and the vulnerability the animals face living in conflict zones, said Bas Huijbregts, who leads the World Wildlife Fund’s wildlife conservation efforts in Africa.

The habitat of the northern white rhino included Congo, South Sudan and the Central African Republic — nations racked by war, political strife and lack of governance.

The northern white rhino “had the unfortunate characteristic of living in one of Africa’s most unstable regions,” Huijbregts said.

Various initiatives are being explored to preserve the species or possibly reintroduce it after the three remaining rhinos die. They include collecting the eggs from the ovaries of at least the younger of the two female northern white rhinos for possible in vitro fertilization.

“That hasn’t happened yet, but the technique is being optimized,” Durrant said.

San Diego’s Frozen Zoo is among at least two research facilities that already have northern white rhino semen.

Durrant said other possible options include using stem cell technology to create a northern white rhino embryo and implanting it in a surrogate female southern white rhino; creating a hybrid between the northern white rhino and the southern white rhino; or cloning the animal if that technology can be applied to the species.

“Once we create sperm and eggs from northern white rhino … we have to know how to mature those eggs in vitro, how to fertilize them in vitro, how to grow the embryos to a certain stage and then how to do embryo transfer,” Durrant said. “We have lot of work to do to develop those technologies.”

Science though is unlikely to bring back the herd, conservationists said.

“Let’s hope it will be another wake-up call for the world to understand that we have to do much more to combat the threat to rhinos,” Huijbregts said. “The key message here is that when the demand [for rhino horn] stops, the killing stops.”


American Bird Conservancy invests in on-the-ground conservation for the Townsend’s Shearwater and other endangered species

American Bird Conservancy.jpg  
Townsend's Shearwater_GECI, J.A. Soriano_PressRelease.png
The Townsend’s Shearwater, along with several other seabird species, will benefit from on-the-ground conservation work and financial support from American Bird Conservancy. Photo by GECI, J.A. Soriano

(Washington, D.C., May 30, 2019)Today, American Bird Conservancy (ABC) announced awards totaling $100,000 to restore important seabird nesting colonies in Mexico, Peru, Chile, and the Dominican Republic. The awards will leverage additional matching funds, putting a total of $243,000 on the ground for direct conservation. Through this effort, ABC and partners are investing in the future of some of the Western Hemisphere’s most imperiled seabirds, including the Townsend’s Shearwater, Guadalupe Murrelet, Ashy Storm-Petrel, Townsend’s Storm-Petrel, Peruvian Diving-Petrel, and Black-capped Petrel. These species are listed as Endangered and Critically Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Some of the nesting sites where the projects will occur are globally recognized for their unique biodiversity through the Alliance for Zero Extinction.

These restoration grants, the first of their kind offered by ABC, address an urgent need for increased investment in capacity for seabird restoration, particularly in South America, where 38 globally threatened seabirds occur amidst unaddressed and growing threats, such as introduced predators.

Support for local initiatives is a key focus of these awards. “We are pleased to provide funds to dedicated local conservationists, many of whom are the only individuals or groups working to protect seabirds in their countries,” says Hannah Nevins, ABC’s Seabird Program Director.

Awards include:

  • MexicoYuliana Bedolla and Federico Mendez of Grupo Ecología y Conservación de las Islas (GECI) will lead a project focused on restoration and monitoring on seven Mexican islands to protect four globally threatened seabird species. GECI is globally recognized for its expertise in eradicating nonnative species from islands. The project will benefit the Critically Endangered Townsend’s Shearwater and Endangered Guadalupe Murrelet, Ashy Storm-Petrel, and Townsend’s Storm-Petrel. Social attraction and artificial burrows will be used to attract birds to nest sites protected from nonnative predators.
     
  • Peru – This project will support conservation of the Endangered Peruvian Diving-Petrel by providing baseline information on nonnative rodent impacts at the birds’ island nesting sites. It will also create a framework to communicate the need for conservation action, including invasive rodent eradication, on two important seabird islands off the Peruvian coast in the Reserva Nacional de Paracas. This effort will be led by Dr. Carlos Zavalaga of Universidad Científica del Sur, Marine Ecosystems Research Unit - Seabird Group, and Dr. Joanna Alfaro of ProDelphinus, in Lima, Peru.
     
  • Chile – Social attraction techniques that broadcast bird calls to simulate the sounds of an active colony will be used to attract Endangered Peruvian Diving-Petrels to the island of Chañaral, which was formerly home to the world’s largest nesting colony of the species, but is now empty. An earlier project to eradicate habitat-damaging nonnative rabbits has made the island safe for the birds to return. This work will be led by Coral Wolf of Island Conservation in collaboration with local partner Dr. Claudia Fernández Zamora of Universidad Católica del Norte, Coquimbo, Chile.
     
  • Dominican Republic – A team, led by Ernst Rupp of the conservation nonprofit Grupo Jaragua and Dr. Yvan Satgé from the South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Clemson University, will work in the Sierra de Bahoruco to protect the few known nesting sites of the Endangered Black-capped Petrelby controlling nonnative predators.

“For species such as the Black-capped Petrel, few nesting sites have been found, so it is critical to protect each and every known site. The clock is ticking loudly for this species. Adult birds return every year to the same burrow and are subject to an onslaught of threats — human disturbance, agricultural encroachment, forest fires, and nonnative predators,” says Nevins.

Seabirds are among the most imperiled groups of birds. About one-third of seabird species are in decline worldwide due the above-mentioned threats, along with sea-level rise, reduction of prey due to overfishing, and fisheries bycatch. Most seabirds nest on or under the ground in burrows, where they are especially vulnerable to nonnative predators, including feral cats, mongooses, rats, and mice.

“Through these awards, ABC seeks to promote the kind of coordinated, large-scale efforts needed to conserve seabird nesting colonies,” added Dr. George Wallace, ABC’s Threatened Species Conservation Officer. “The goal is to ensure that our children will see these magnificent species persist into the next century and beyond.”

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American Bird Conservancy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation. Find us on abcbirds.orgFacebookInstagram, and Twitter (@ABCbirds).

Talkin' Pets News

May 11, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Zach Budin

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guest - Friend of Talkin' Pets PAUL BOGART’S NEW SINGLE “MOTHERS & SONS” IS JUST IN TIME FOR MOTHER’S DAY and he will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 5/11/19 to discuss his new single and give away autographed pics

Talkin' Pets News

November 24, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Daisey Charlotte

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media / Producer - Bob Page

Special Guest - Ronnie McMullen - CEO of Ancient Life Oil will join Jon and Talkin' Pets at 721pm EST to discuss his CBD product.

 

Cynthia Smoot is the Emmy award-winning co-anchor of the FOX 13 11 O'clock News

When she's not at the anchor desk, Cynthia's likely covering a story about Florida's fabulous wildlife or people and their pets. She loves nature and enjoys helping Tampa Bay viewers get to know some of the interesting creatures in our own backyard, such as "Winter," the little dolphin at Clearwater Marine Aquarium that lost her tail but now swims with the help of a prosthesis.

She has also reported on some of the area's most notorious animal cruelty cases, following the story of "Casper," a boxer that was nearly starved to death, from the day he arrived at the county shelter to the day he went home with his new adoptive owner.

Cynthia has also traveled to the Everglades to report on the threat of Burmese pythons to our native wildlife, and to Boca Grande, where invasive spiny-tailed iguanas are pushing out threatened gopher tortoises and eating native birds.

In 1998, Cynthia received a prestigious Emmy award for "A Real Life Horse Whisperer," the story of Monty Roberts, who helped revolutionize horse training with his non-violent methods.

Cynthia grew up in Yorktown, Virginia and received her B.A. in communications from James Madison University. She's a 30-year veteran of broadcast journalism, with a career that began in radio as an award-winning morning news anchor and news director, and for the past 28 years, in television as a producer, reporter, and anchor.

Before coming to WTVT in 1997, Cynthia spent 13 years at the FOX owned and operated TV station in Greensboro/Winston-Salem/High Point, North Carolina as the 5, 6 and 10 p.m. news anchor. In North Carolina, she was deeply involved in children's issues and received a number of community awards and honor for her involvement and advocacy on issues relating to foster care and adoption, infant mortality, teenage pregnancy and working women.

Cynthia was also involved with the North Carolina chapter of "Operation Smile," twice
traveling abroad with medical teams to report on the life-changing surgery they perform on children with facial and limb deformities.

Cynthia lives in Tierra Verde with her husband Bill, greyhound Karma, and Bo the cat. Cynthia’s horse, Bucky, prefers the country life in Manatee County.

If you would like to contact Cynthia, you can email her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can also connect with her on Facebook and follow her on Twitter @CynthiaSmoot.

 

Cheetah Conservation Fund is the world’s leading organization dedicated to saving the cheetah in the wild. Founded by Dr. Laurie Marker in 1990, CCF has created a set of integrated programs aimed at addressing the principle threats to the cheetah.

 

CCF’s conservation programming is rooted in scientific research. CCF maintains a research program on the biology, ecology and genetics of cheetahs that publishes papers in peer-reviewed journals annually, and currently operates the only fully-equipped genetics lab at an in-situ conservation facility in Africa.

 

Using this research as an underpinning, CCF has created a set of integrated programs that together address the threats both to the cheetah and its entire ecosystem, including human populations. CCF operates from the principal that only by securing the future of the communities that live alongside the cheetah can you secure a future for the cheetah. Helping people helps cheetahs.

 

Learn about the cheetah and what we do to help it win the race against extinction:

 

Welcome.

 

If you’re here, it’s a pretty good bet that, like me, you think the cheetah is special. It’s the world’s fastest land animal, and the oldest species of big cat. It’s also Africa’s most endangered big cat. We’ve lost over 90 percent of the world’s wild population in the past 100 years. And if we don’t act now, we might lose the cheetah forever.

 

I invite you to join us

 

Be part of our work here in Namibia and around the world. Donate. Visit. Volunteer. While we love hosting interns, working guests and visitors at our International Research and Education Center in Namibia, Africa, the truth is that you can help the cheetah right now, right where you are.

 

What will it take to save the cheetah?

 

Saving the cheetah means addressing its entire ecosystem, including the people who live in the cheetah’s range. Ninety percent of cheetahs in the wild live outside protected areas, alongside human communities. Securing a future for the cheetah means securing the future of the people who live in cheetah country. For nearly 25 years, Cheetah Conservation Fund has been doing just that – through our celebrated Livestock Guarding Dog program, and our award-winning habitat restoration project, Bushblok. We’re based in Namibia, where the world’s largest population of wild cheetahs lives, and everything we do is aimed at creating a thriving ecosystem so that cheetahs and humans can live together.

 

We need you, starting today.

 

Join our mailing list and learn more, be part of our CCF family. The race is on to save the cheetah, and with your help, we can win it.

 

For Cheetahs Everywhere,

 

Founded in Namibia in 1990, Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) is the global leader in research and conservation of cheetahs. CCF is dedicated to saving the cheetah in the wild.

 

The vast majority of wild cheetahs are outside protected areas, in areas populated by humans. Saving this magnificent animal from extinction requires innovative conservation methods that address the welfare of both cheetah and human populations over large landscapes. CCF has developed a set of integrated programs that work together to achieve this objective. CCF’s programs have effectively stabilized and even increased the wild cheetah population in Namibia.

 

CCF’s mission is to be the internationally recognized center of excellence in the conservation of cheetahs and their ecosystems. CCF will work with all stakeholders to develop best practices in research, education, and land use to benefit all species, including people.

 

CCF is an international non-profit organization headquartered in Namibia, with operations in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, and partner organizations in several other nations.

 

Location

 

Cheetah Conservation Fund is located in Otjiwarongo, Namibia, about three hours north of the capital city of Windhoek. CCF’s International Research and Education Centre is a renowned research facility that sets the standard for researchers and students worldwide seeking to learn more about the cheetah. It is a center for conservation programming and education, the base from which CCF reaches thousands of farmers, tens of thousands of students and hundreds of thousands of online supporters worldwide.

 

Even with all of this world-class, innovative conservation work going on, CCF is also an ecotourism destination, providing informative and memorable experiences for travelers whether they visit us for a day, or stay overnight in our guest house accommodations. Ask anyone who’s been here – there is no place on earth like CCF.

 

Research Facilities

 

Through the generosity of Life Technologies, CCF has developed a DNA laboratory that conducts a non-invasive, genetic monitoring program to provide accurate population estimates of cheetahs in Namibia and other home-range countries. The laboratory also researches questions involving cheetah gene flow and geographical patterns of genetic variation, as well as adaptive questions related to the cheetah’s behavioral ecology in specific habitats. The lab plays a key role in training the next generation of wildlife geneticists.

 

Learn more about Research

 

Model Farm and Creamery

 

The CCF Center includes several model farms that have been developed to research and display predator-friendly and commercially viable livestock and wildlife programs. Innovative business initiatives include the Bushblok compressed fuel log, made from invasive thorn bush and the Dancing Goat Creamery which makes goat’s cheese made from CCF’s goats which are protected by its Anatolian Shepherds and Kangal Livestock Guarding Dogs. Educational groups and visiting farmers have the opportunity to see first-hand that farmers and cheetah can co-exist.

 

Education Centre and Cheetah Museum

 

CCF’s education center and Cheetah Museum displays are designed around CCF’s scientific research findings and provide detailed information about the cheetah: its history, physiology, importance within the ecosystem, conflict with humans, and what CCF is doing to ensure the species’ survival for future generations.

 

CCF’s Education Team presents two-day or longer environmental courses for school groups with overnight accommodation provided at the CCF educational campsites. Since 2000, over 15,000 students have participated in these courses at the Center. In addition to school groups, regional youth groups, youth officials, teachers, health officials and farmers participate in specially designed programs at CCF’s Center.findings and provide detailed information about the cheetah: its history, physiology, importance within the ecosystem, conflict with humans, and what CCF is doing to ensure the species’ survival for future generations.

 

The CCF children’s educational playground demonstrates that learning can be fun. Children complete a range of activities designed to demonstrate cheetah physiology and environmental issues.

 

Learn more about Education

 

Resident Cheetahs

 

Since its founding in 1990, CCF has had great success working with farmers who have cheetahs living on their land. This has led to over half of the more than 900 cheetahs CCF has worked with being released back into the wild. But there are always orphaned and injured cheetahs and here at CCF they are given a large, peaceful sanctuary. These cheetahs, not able to make it in the wild due to behavioral or medical problems, are part of ongoing research to better understand cheetah biology, physiology and behavior. Some of CCF’s orphan cheetahs can be viewed at feeding time (14:00 h on week days and 12:00 h on weekends), or can be seen close up on a Cheetah Safari Drive. You can watch cheetahs run like the wind during a ‘Cheetah Run’ or view them in their natural habitat in CCF’s Bellebenno Reserve with excellent photo and viewing opportunities (based on availability). Enjoy a private safari through CCF’s own “Little Serengeti”, a picturesque open plain featuring large herds of hartebeest, oryx, springbok, warthog, and jackals; and don’t miss out on the ‘Cheetah Exclusive’, during which you will enjoy a unique personal encounter with one of CCF’s ambassador cheetahs and spend some time with CCF’s research staff.

 

Sponsor a Resident Cheetah

 

The cheetah is one of the most specialized of the 37 cat species with only one species in its genus, Acinonyx. During the 1980s, CCF and its research collaborators studied many aspects of cheetah biology including genetics, reproductive physiology, and virology. These early studies identified the cheetah’s limited genetic variation that results in reproductive and health problems. CCF’s current research focuses on a number of aspects of the cheetah’s life cycle, ecology, biology and genetics.

 


 

Health and Reproduction

 

CCF’s on-going research on the wild cheetah includes studying the genetics and relatedness of the population, the incidence of disease, stress hormone levels, and the reproductive health of the population. Through weighing and measuring for morphometric studies, analysis of dental structure and reproductive fitness, CCF is learning more about the overall health of the world’s cheetah population.

 


 

The Life Technologies Conservation Genetics Laboratory

 

CCF is home to a world class research facility that is unique in Africa. It includes the Haas Family Veterinary Clinic and the Life Technologies Conservation Genetics Laboratory, which is the only fully-equipped genetics lab in situ at a conservation facility in Africa. From this facility, CCF collaborates with scientists around the globe on research that not only benefits the cheetah and its ecosystem, but other big cats and predators as well. The Haas Family Veterinary Clinic allows us to not only collect samples from cheetahs that we take into our facility, it allows us to provide prompt veterinary care to our cheetahs, dogs, goats and other animals when they have need.

 

Assuring the good health of all our residents is an important part of making conservation work here at CCF. The genetics laboratory was made possible thanks to the generous donation of PCR machines, a Sequence Analyzer, and an initial batch of reagents from Applied Biosystems (now Life Technologies) at the time of the setup and a new laser in 2012. The addition of the state of the art non-invasive laboratory for our international scat samples in 2009 was supported by the Ohrstrom Foundation. We have had the chance to be able to use a great genetic analysis software called “geneious” since 2010, for which licenses were generously donated by the company who created it (Biomatters). Additional donations from private individuals and the surplus department of the National Institutes of Health provided valuable equipment such as a UV work station, centrifuges, pipettemen, electrophoresis systems and a camera system for the visualization of DNA, spectrophotometer, scales, glassware, and other lab ware.

 

We want to thank everybody for their support. One of the major motivating factors in having a laboratory in Namibia is to be able to process samples locally instead of having to send African samples to the US and Europe. This has several advantages including decreasing the dependence of Namibia from other countries and allowing Namibian students to be exposed to genetic research and conservation at CCF, at the same time avoiding the complications of sample export. Since 2009 we have trained 1-2 Namibian graduates a year in the laboratory. CCF is committed to working with students, both in Namibia and abroad, and training the next generation of environmental and genetic scientists.

 


 

Scat Detection Dogs

 

Trained scat-sniffing dogs help CCF ecologists find cheetah scat in the field. DNA is then extracted in its laboratory to identify individual cheetahs and understand cheetah population structure.

 


 

Genome Resource Bank

 

CCF has developed best-practice techniques for storing sperm, tissues and blood samples in its Genome Resource Bank (GRB), to provide ‘insurance’ for the cheetah’s survival. As a result, CCF maintains one of the largest GRB’s for an endangered species. Cryopreservation methods continue to be studied and refined in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC, USA.

 


 

Behavior Demographics, Home Range, and Reintroduction

 

CCF investigates the movement of the cheetah to determine home ranges, habitat preference and seasonal use, territoriality, and behaviors unique to individual cheetah populations that may be critical for their survival. CCF develops and implements relocation, reintroduction, and non-invasive monitoring methodologies to ensure a viable wild population, and gathers data on the status of wild cheetahs.

 


 

Cheetah Census Research

 

Cheetahs are very difficult to count using conventional census techniques due to their secretive nature. CCF has tested various census and monitoring techniques, including radio-telemetry, spoor track counts and camera traps, and calibrating these to existing known density estimates in its research study area.

 


 

Ecological Research

 

CCF identifies vegetation and monitors growth patterns within CCF study areas, identifying target areas for ecological management, and investigating how bush encroachment affects biodiversity. CCF also conducts prey base studies that monitor habitat use by game species. CCF collates historical data regarding predation, develops methodologies for the reintroduction of prey species, and encourages standardized prey studies in other cheetah-range countries.

 


 

Investigating Human and Wildlife Conflict

 

CCF collaborates with farmers to better understand traditional farm management techniques and perceptions. CCF evaluates various non-lethal livestock management and predator control techniques that can reduce the indiscriminate removal of cheetah. The CCF research program includes CCF as a Model Farm and non-lethal predator control such as livestock guarding dogs.

 


 

Long-term Research and Education Partners:

 

 

 

View our research library

 

Environmental education plays a key role in Cheetah Conservation Fund’s (CCF) mission. CCF believes that public education and the development of national pride and international concern for the cheetah are critical to its survival, and therefore educates farmers, teachers, and the public about methods to conserve biodiversity and about the role of the cheetah and other predators in healthy ecosystems. CCF’s Education program includes:

 

Cheetah Fact Sheet Educational Resources

 


 

CCF’s International Research Conservation
And Education Center

 

In central Namibia, CCF operates a Field Research and Education Center to conduct formal and informal education programs. The Center is open to the public daily and offers educational activities, programs for visiting school groups, and training for Namibian and foreign university students.

 

CCF’s education center and Cheetah Museum displays are designed around CCF’s scientific research findings and provide detailed information about the cheetah: its history, physiology, importance within the ecosystem, conflict with humans, and what CCF is doing to ensure the species’ survival for future generations.

 

CCF’s Education Team presents two-day or longer environmental courses for school groups with overnight accommodation provided at the CCF educational campsites. Since 2000, over 15,000 students have participated in these courses at the Center. In addition to school groups, regional youth groups, youth officials, teachers, health officials and farmers participate in specially designed programs at CCF’s Center.

 


 

School Outreach Programs

 

Along with educational activities conducted at the Center, CCF’s Education Team presents outreach programs at schools and community events throughout Namibia. Since 1994, over 300,000 students have participated in a CCF outreach program.
 
Educational Resources

 


 

Farmer Training And Community Outreach

 

As 90 percent of Namibia’s wild cheetahs live on farmlands and come into conflict with farmers, livestock and game farming interests, CCF conducts a specific environmental education program for the farming community. CCF makes presentations at individual farms, farmers’ association meetings and agricultural shows, highlighting proven cheetah behavioral characteristics and predator-friendly livestock management techniques.

 

CCF’s Education Team conducts week-long training courses for communal conservancies, emerging and re-settled farmers, and extension officers. CCF’s courses are aimed at improving understanding of farming production principles and systems as well as providing hands-on training. Topics include cattle husbandry, herd and veld management, disease and vaccination programs, business principles and inventorying conservancy resources. Other topics include basic conservation training on sustainable wildlife utilization and the role and value of predators, predator kill identification and other ‘predator-friendly’ farming practices. Over 3,000 participants have undergone training at CCF’s Center. Several training courses are conducted each year.

 


 

International Training Courses

 

Cheetah conservation is interconnected to social, economic, and environmental factors which are of national concern. The next generation of African conservation managers must be equipped with the best training available. CCF has hosted several education and conservation biology courses for wildlife professionals. Collaborative partners include the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution and the Namibian Ministry of Higher Education. Over 300 Namibian and international course participants have completed courses on natural resource management, environmental education, conservation biology, game capture, and integrated wildlife, livestock and predator management.

 

CCF has close links and assists in training and sharing program successes with other countries where cheetah live, including Botswana, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Iran, Algeria and more recently, Angola. In many of these countries, efforts are currently underway to develop new conservation programs or support existing cheetah conservation efforts. CCF’s international collaborations involve distributing CCF materials, lending resources and support, and providing training through Africa and the rest of the world.

 

Additionally, CCF has been working in an advisory capacity with the Wildlife Trust of India and India’s authorities to discuss the best strategies for re-introducing cheetahs in India.

 

Countries in which CCF maintains ongoing collaborations:

 

Kenya

 

The Kenya cheetah population has declined over the past decade. The Kenya Wildlife Service has asked CCF to determine population distribution in the country as well as to identify population needs. CCF established a Kenyan satellite centre and employed two staff to begin research, conservation, and education programs. In addition, CCF is assisting with a project in the Masai Mara to study the impact of tourism on cheetahs and has worked with the industry to distribute awareness materials. In cooperation with Friends of Conservation, Kenya Wildlife Service, and Kenya Wildlife Clubs, CCF has provided student and teacher resource materials for their use in schools throughout Kenya.

 


 

Tanzania

 

In 2013, Tanzania became the fourth country to which CCF has sent its celebrated livestock guarding dogs to help with human-wildlife conflict. The dogs were sent to the Ruaha Carnivore Project (RCP) run by Dr. Amy Dickman. RCP is part of Oxford University’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU), with whom CCF Founder and Executive Director Dr. Marker conducted her doctoral research. Goats from neighboring farms have been brought to a specially prepared kraal in the RCP research area to begin training the puppies. This represents the first known attempt to bring in specialized guarding dogs to help Tanzanian pastoralists protect their livestock.

 


 

Botswana

 

Botswana’s cheetah population may be the second largest free-ranging population, and a large percentage is found outside of protected areas. Botswana has used CCF as a model in the development of their programs. CCF has trained the Botswana Cheetah team in handling cheetahs, and developing survey and educational materials that will be utilized with the local farming community.

 


 

South Africa

 

CCF’s sister organization, Cheetah Outreach uses hand-raised, captive-born cheetahs as educational ambassadors at local schools, and to introduce the public to the problems facing the cheetah. Cheetah Outreach has adopted CCF’s Namibian education model, and has developed and implemented a school curriculum with the Western Cape Education Department. CCF works closely with the National Cheetah Monitoring Program and the DeWildt Cheetah Research Center.

 


 

Iran

 

The Iranian Cheetah Conservation project is supported by a United Nations Development Program (UNDP) grant entitled “Conservation of the Asiatic Cheetah, Its Natural Habitat and Associated Biota”. CCF maintains in close contact (weekly or more) with the Iranian groups involved in this project to provide support and guidance in their conservation efforts to save this last remaining population of Asian cheetahs. CCF has been to Iran twice to assist on the project and have been given a permit to work in Iran thus allowing a closer collaboration with this group.

 


 

North and West Africa

 

CCF’s Director is an active member of a newly developing North and West Africa project to identify the needs to save the Sahel cheetah. Currently, working in cooperation with a French Zoological Park, the Paris Museum of Natural History, and the Cat Specialist Group a formal group was developed. In addition, in 2005 CCF joined a collaborative survey team into Algeria to begin laying ground work for conservation efforts in this country. CCF trained one of the Algerian team members in Namibia in 2004.

 

Feared Extinct, the Táchira Antpitta Has Been Found in Remote Andean Region

 

(Washington, D.C., July 25, 2017) An international team of researchers has solved one of South America’s great bird mysteries. Working deep in the mountainous forests of western Venezuela, they have rediscovered the Táchira Antpitta, a plump brown bird species not seen since it was first recorded in the 1950s.

The 7.5-inch-long Táchira (TAH-chee-rah) Antpitta had not been spotted since 1955-56, when ornithologists first recorded and described it. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists the species as Critically Endangered, and many feared it was lost for good.

Last year, scientists of the Red Siskin Initiative (RSI) — a conservation partnership between the Smithsonian and several scientific organizations in Venezuela — organized a team to go in search of the antpitta. The team was led by Jhonathan Miranda of RSI and Provita, and included colleagues Alejandro Nagy, Peter Bichier of the University of California at Santa Cruz, and Miguel Lentino and Miguel Matta of the Colección Ornitólogica Phelps (COP). American Bird Conservancy (ABC) provided financial support through a William Belton Conservation Fund grant as part of its ongoing Search for Lost Birds.

The team set out in June 2016, knowing that several factors were likely to make the antpitta especially challenging to find, if in fact it still existed. The species inhabits dense undergrowth at altitudes of 5,000 to 7,000 feet in a rugged and hard-to-reach region of the Andes. Difficult to identify visually, the bird differs in coloration in subtle ways from related species.

Antpittas are also easier to hear than to see. But without sound recordings, nobody knew what to listen for.

The researchers had an advantage: They knew where to look.  “We followed the route described in the earlier expedition’s field notebooks to locate the original site of the discovery,” Miranda said.

To reach the remote location, part of what is now El Tamá National Park, the team traveled by foot on steep and narrow Andean trails, with a mule train to carry their gear. From their campsite, the team hiked two hours in the dark to reach appropriate habitat at dawn, the best time to hear the birds sing.

The first day there, Miranda and Nagy detected the distinctive song of an antpitta they had not heard before. “We were thrilled to re-find the Táchira Antpitta during our first day in the field,” said Miranda, “and we think they persist in more places we have not yet searched.”

Over the next week, the team was able to confirm the mysterious song as that of the long-lost Táchira Antpitta, obtaining the first photographs and sound recordings ever made of the living bird.

“The rediscovery provides hope and inspiration that we still have a chance to conserve this species,” said Daniel Lebbin, ABC’s Vice President of International Programs. “We hope this rediscovery will lead to improved management of and attention for protected areas like El Tamá National Park.”

“El Tamá National Park is an important part of Venezuela’s natural heritage and recognized by the Alliance for Zero Extinction as a critical site to protect for the Táchira Antpitta and other biodiversity,” said Jon Paul Rodriguez of Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC, the Venezuelan Institute of Scientific Research), Provita, and the IUCN Species Survival Commission.

“Jhonathan Miranda and his RSI colleagues have resolved one of South America’s great bird mysteries, and we hope their findings will contribute to a renewed effort to conserve this species,” said Lebbin.

In the coming months, the team plans to publish the full details of their findings in a scientific journal, including how the Táchira Antpitta’s voice and visual characteristics distinguish it from other similar species. Additional field work is necessary to learn more about this mysterious bird. Similar habitat can be found nearby in Colombia, and the species might also occur there. Better knowledge of the species’ vocalizations and the visual identification gathered in this study will help researchers determine the species' full range, ecology and habitat requirements, and how best to ensure its conservation.

“This species was originally described by William H. Phelps, Jr. of the COP and Alexander Wetmore, former Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution,” said Michael Braun of the RSI and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. “It is fitting that the Red Siskin Initiative, in which COP and the Smithsonian are key collaborators, has been instrumental in the rediscovery. We invite those interested in helping us learn more about this species to join us.”

The Venezuela search team owes its success to a number of individuals and institutions. Logistical support came from ABC, RSI, IVIC, COP, Provita, INPARQUES, Ascanio Birding Tours, the Smithsonian Institution, and the following individuals: Carolina Afan, Miguel Angel Arvelo, David Ascanio, Michael Braun, Felix Briceño, Brian Coyle, Dan Lebbin, Cipriano Ochoa, Tomás Odenall, Jorge Perez Eman, Jon Paul Rodriguez, Kathryn Rodriguez-Clark, and Bibiana Sucre.

(Photo: Táchira Antpitta by Jhonathan Miranda)

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American Bird Conservancy is dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation.

Colección Ornitólogica Phelps (Phelps Ornithological Collection) is a private organization aiming to know the diversity, distribution, taxonomic and systematics of the birds of Venezuela. It is the largest and most complete collection of birds in Latin America, and among the 20 largest collections in the world, which has allowed Venezuela to be the country of Latin America best known in birds.

Provita is an NGO devoted to conservation of Venezuela's environment in its widest sense, using multiple fields of knowledge and innovative approaches to achieve integral solutions. In our almost three decades, we have successfully completed hundreds of projects, ranging from recovery of emblematic endangered species, to developing alternative livelihoods for indigenous and rural communities.

The National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, is the largest natural history museum in the world, with more than 140 million cataloged specimens, and annual visitorship of more than 7 million. The Museum conducts natural history research and fieldwork around the globe.

 

New Reserve May Stave Off Extinction for Cherry-throated Tanager

(Washington, D.C., June 5, 2017) The critically endangered Cherry-throated Tanager, which numbers as few as 30 individuals, has gained a much-needed refuge in Brazil’s threatened Atlantic Forest. The 4,171-acre (1,688-hectare) private natural heritage reserve, not yet named, protects essential habitat and provides a lifeline for the species.

The Cherry-throated Tanager went unseen for more than 50 years and was believed to be extinct in the wild until 1998, when it was sighted again in privately held, well-preserved forest patches in the Caetés region of Espírito Santo. Protecting every possible acre is important in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest, where only about 10 percent of original habitat remains.

The new reserve is the second-largest private protected area in the state of Espírito Santo and shelters more than 250 bird species, in addition to the Cherry-throated Tanager. Five other globally threatened birds are also found in the surrounding Caetés region: White-necked Hawk, Brown-backed Parrotlet, Golden-tailed Parrotlet, Vinaceous Amazon Parrot, and Bare-throated Bellbird. Threatened mammals, including endangered buffy-headed marmoset and brown-throated sloth, will potentially gain habitat as well.

SAVE Brasil worked with Grupo Águia Branca, one of the country’s largest transportation and logistics companies, to create this private reserve. SAVE has also been working with the state government to create a 10,625-acre (4,300-hectare) wildlife refuge adjacent to the private reserve, and American Bird Conservancy (ABC) supported SAVE on the public consultation process in 2016. ABC and SAVE’s support of the government on outreach for the wildlife refuge also helped in the creation of the private reserve.

“We hope that creation of the new reserve will accelerate the process of establishing the wildlife refuge,” said Dan Lebbin, ABC’s Vice President of International Programs. “With a total of nearly 15,000 acres (nearly 6,000 hectares), these two protected areas would contribute much-needed hope for the tanager’s survival.”

Cherry-throated Tanager occurs primarily in the forest canopy at elevations between approximately 2,800 to 4,000 feet (850 to 1,250 meters). Single individuals or groups of up to 10 birds can be found, occasionally associated with mixed-species flocks. The population may be as high as 250 but is more likely closer to 30 individual birds left in the world. Recent sightings have been of small groups of two or three tanagers observed at the same site.

The species is a candidate for designation as an Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) species. AZE species are those assessed as endangered or critically endangered that are restricted to one site globally. These species are those in most urgent need of conservation globally.

As few as 30 Cherry-throated Tanagers are left in the world. Photo by Ciro Albano

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American Bird Conservancy is dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation.

SAVE Brasil (Society for the Conservation of Birds in Brazil) is a non-profit, non-governmental organization dedicated to the conservation of Brazilian birds and nature. Following a participatory approach, we work together with governments, civil society organizations, universities, business and communities to develop and implement strategies, programs, and actions that contribute to a better, healthier and more beautiful planet for animals, plants, and people.

 

Washington, D.C., February 16, 2017 -- Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, is calling on the U.S. Department of the Interior to issue its decision listing all pangolin species as endangered as World Pangolin Day approaches on February 18. In July 2015, Born Free USA and other wildlife groups petitioned the U.S. government to designate seven species of pangolins as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). If granted, the import and interstate sale of all pangolins and pangolin parts would be fundamentally prohibited in the U.S.

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, “Fragile pangolins are considered the most heavily-traded mammal in the world today, coveted in markets globally for their scales, meat, and other body parts. Concerted and coordinated global action is essential to save them from extinction, and the U.S. has an opportunity to contribute to long-term conservation of all pangolin species with ESA protection. We have no time to lose, and it would be a shameful indictment of conservation leadership if these animals were to disappear while American government paralysis leads to inaction.”

Born Free USA is encouraging the U.S. to act now, following overwhelming votes last fall by the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) of Wild Fauna and Flora, which listed all eight species of pangolins on Appendix I of the Treaty, thus terminating international commercial trade. Most species received CITES trade protection by consensus, and the two Asian pangolin species that received an actual vote had but one dissenting vote.

Roberts adds, “It is estimated that, in the next 21 years, African pangolin species could decline by 30 to 40%, while some Asian species could decline by up to 90%. Although the international community made a great commitment last year to strengthen the protection of pangolins, these efforts will be in vain with no enforcement of new regulations.”

A pangolin is snatched from the wild every five minutes, and at least one pangolin is killed every hour in Asia. Between July 2000 and July 2016, more than one million pangolins were trafficked. Just in the past two months alone, there was a seizure of almost three tons of pangolin scales smuggled into Thailand from Congo and destined for Laos; an arrest of a Tanzanian pangolin smuggler in Uganda with six tons of scales; a seizure in Cameroon of 670 kg of pangolin scales bound for Malaysia; and a seizure in China of more than three tons of pangolin scales, corresponding to about 5,000-7,500 pangolins, in a container labeled as containing timber from Africa.

“These reports are catastrophic. Pangolins have an extremely important ecological role. If they go extinct, there would be a cascading impact on the environment. They are natural controllers of termites and ants, and their loss would be devastating on multiple levels,” Roberts says.

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic “pets,” trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to North America the message of “compassionate conservation”—the vision of the United Kingdom-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free’s mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

 

Reserve Expansion Protects Araripe Manakin, Other Species

 

(Washington, D.C., Dec. 16, 2016) American Bird Conservancy (ABC) and its Brazilian partner Aquasis have secured more than 170 acres of critical habitat for Araripe Manakin, one of the world’s rarest and most spectacular birds. The land acquisition roughly doubles the size of the existing Araripe Oasis Reserve in northeastern Brazil, and connects it to the much larger Araripe National Forest, potentially protecting new breeding territories for the striking red-and-white bird and other rare species such as Yellow-faced Siskin.

Expanding the reserve is a critical contribution to the survival of the Araripe Manakin, an Alliance for Zero Extinction species. Discovered only 20 years ago, the species has dwindled to a population of fewer than a thousand individuals. These birds depend on a unique type of forest found only at the base of the Araripe Plateau in Brazil, where encroaching human development—including farming, cattle grazing, and home construction—has pushed them to the edge of extinction.

In 2014, ABC helped Aquasis purchase 140 acres in a prime breeding area for the Araripe Manakin. This year, ABC and Aquasis had the opportunity to acquire an adjacent property that includes springs, streams, and forests—all the elements required to support as many as eight new breeding territories for Araripe Manakin. The purchase was made possible by the support of the IUCN National Committee of The Netherlands, Gulf Coast Bird Observatory, Quick Response Biodiversity Fund, David Davidson, Larry Thompson, Silicon Valley Community Foundation, and a number of other donors who generously gave to ABC’s online campaign.

“With this expansion, we can continue to secure the Oasis Reserve as an epicenter for forest habitat protection and restoration, the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services, and the wise use of water resources along the slopes of the Araripe Plateau,” said Alberto Campos, Aquasis Co-Founder and Director of Development.

Refuge in a Dry Land

The Araripe Plateau occurs in the heart of the vast, semi-arid, drought-stricken caatinga biome that dominates most of the landscape of northeastern Brazil. Water here is precious, and the demand for it is increasing as the region quickly develops into an urban landscape.

The Oasis Reserve provides a life-giving source of water for the surrounding communities living in the caatinga shrublands. It also serves as an essential refuge for other birds that specialize in this habitat, such as the Silvery-cheeked Antshrike, the White-browed Antpitta, and the Caatinga Antshrike.

Another endemic species in the area, the Yellow-faced Siskin, will also benefit from the reserve expansion. This northeastern Brazilian bird, a favorite target of the pet trade, uses many kinds of habitat, including lowlands, mountains, forests, and open areas. The bird was relatively common until the 1980s but it has declined substantially in recent decades.

Expanding the reserve not only protects essential territory for the birds, it enables conservation actions that will boost their numbers. “For many of these species closing in on the brink of extinction, we need to do more than just protect habitat,” said Bennett Hennessy, ABC’s Brazil Program Coordinator. “We need to understand the species’ limiting factors and actively manage habitat to increase the population. The Oasis Araripe Reserve has the in-depth research knowledge to apply habitat improvement techniques to increase the population of the Araripe Manakin on land the reserve owns.”

Managing water resources will be essential to that effort, because streams have been an important limiting factor in the recuperation of the Araripe Manakin. The birds breed in understory vegetation that overhangs running water. While this makes it harder for predators to reach the birds’ nests, it limits breeding sites in such a drought-prone area where springs and streams are rare.

Because streams are so important for local agriculture, most streams in the region, even those in forested areas, are heavily used, with water diverted elsewhere for use by people. Human activity, including habitat destruction that leads to forest loss, has also been directly destroying Manakin breeding habitat. The removal of stream-edge vegetation leaves fewer areas in which Araripe Manakins can nest.

The reserve extension will allow Aquasis to better manage two vitally important springs in the area for the benefit of birds as well as people. The southern spring will be managed to create two streams, which Aquasis will reforest with vegetation that offers ideal breeding habitat for the Araripe Manakin.

Aquasis will also now be able to use the northernmost spring to create a stream route that traverses more of the forest area and offers more breeding territory for the birds. With good stream management and revegetation, Aquasis predicts it will be able to provide habitat for 12 new nests in the northern part of the reserve—where the newly acquired land is located—and eight in the southern section. That would support breeding areas for as many as 20 pairs of Araripe Manakins, whose reproductive success will be vital to the survival of their species.

 

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American Bird Conservancy is the Western Hemisphere's bird conservation specialist—the only organization with a single and steadfast commitment to achieving conservation results for native birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With a focus on efficiency and working in partnership, we take on the toughest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on sound science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation.

Aquasis (Association for the Research and Preservation of Aquatic Ecosystems) was established as a non-governmental organization in 1994, and is the leading organization in Brazil for the protection of the Araripe Manakin. In 2011 Aquasis published the species Conservation Action Plan, which was approved by the federal Ministry of the Environment in Brazil.

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