Displaying items by tag: dogs

Various agencies collaborate to place current shelter population
with rescue groups throughout region

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®), through its Shelter Response Partnership program, is transporting more than 30 dogs from the Humane Society of Henderson County in Henderson, Ky., to several shelters and rescue groups throughout the region. Officials at the local shelter requested the ASPCA’s assistance in the transfer and placement of the current shelter population to enable them to house animals that were seized during a recent criminal investigation and allow the dogs a chance for adoption at other shelters through the transport operation.

The ASPCA Shelter Response Partnership program is a network of national and local animal welfare organizations that assists the ASPCA Field Investigations and Response team by providing a second chance for animals rescued from overcrowded facilities and cruelty investigations.

“The ASPCA is grateful for our response partners who stepped up to help a shelter with limited resources and offer to help transfer and place the animals in permanent homes,” said Joel Lopez, senior manager of operations for ASPCA Field Investigations and Response. “The transport and placement plan will allow the Humane Society of Henderson County to continue its daily operations without overcrowding its facility.”

The dogs—which include a variety of different breeds such as Labrador, shepherd, boxer and hound mixes—were medically examined and behaviorally evaluated by ASPCA responders in the past week. Dr. Pamela Reid, vice president of the ASPCA’s Anti-Cruelty Behavior team, reported that the majority of the dogs were very friendly and will make great companions for individuals and families looking to add a four-legged member to their home.

“The ASPCA stepped in to ensure that the recent string of criminal court cases and seizures did not overpopulate our shelter, putting adoptable animals at risk,” said Joshua Cromer, shelter director of the Humane Society of Henderson County. “We are grateful that the ASPCA provided resources to help in the placement of our animals, and I’m confident that they will be placed into loving homes. We will be able to continue to do our work in speaking up and protecting homeless, neglected and abused animals that don't have a voice in our community.”

The ASPCA animal transport trailer, a custom-built 60-foot-long vehicle, will be making several stops during the transfer operation. Agencies assisting the ASPCA with placement include: Kentucky Humane Society (Louisville, Ky.); Capital Area Humane Society (Hilliard, Ohio); and SPCA Cincinnati (Cincinnati, Ohio).

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. More than one million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org.

To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to www.twitter.com/aspca.

### 

 

Natural Healing for Cat, Dogs, Horses and Other Animals

Arizona to Alaska

Born in Phoenix, Lisa lived in numerous Arizona towns as a child and later spent several years in California. By young adulthood, she was in Alaska and started mountain climbing. She climbed in South America on different expeditions, seeking summits in Ecuador, Chile and Argentina. She also traveled solo through Europe and Asia.

 

From Fire to Shield to Evergreen

Climbing left Lisa wanting strong first-aid skills and she signed-up for an Emergency Medical Technician course. The class included a ride-along with the Fire Department which exposed her to the rewards of helping people in crisis. She moved to Oregon for training and was soon back in Alaska, pulling 24-hour shifts as a paramedic.

 

“Paramedicine is physical and autonomous and demanding and technical. I loved it.”

After a number of years, she transferred to the Police Department. Her second career started with the position of street officer and she still claims it is the most demanding job in law enforcement. After a few years, she became a detective, working in the Vice unit and later in Crimes Against Children, with a special assignment as a Hostage Negotiator. She went back to the street as a sergeant and later returned to investigations, supervising Internal Affairs.

 

“All those years in emergency services made the city a map of memories, many of them very sad. I wanted to move…a couple of thousand miles.”

 

Riding, Writing and Running

Lisa and her husband relocated to the Evergreen State and adopted two former racehorses from a rescue facility. She turned to writing, working on both mysteries and mainstream novels. One novel was selected as a finalist in the 2007 Malice Domestic contest and another made the Top 100 in the 2008 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award contest. Lisa also began competing in the obscure sport of Ride and Tie, a back country trail race that combines running and riding, covering distances of 20-35 miles.

 

“Writing is such a sedentary pursuit, it would be dreadful without the promise of hours on trails.”

 

Miles alone on the million acres that is Washington’s Olympic Peninsula left Lisa wanting protective company. She found a German Shepherd at a pet rescue site and taught him tracking, as she had with her previous dogs.

 

“My last shepherd earned the FH title twice. This was before the existence of the FHII and VST titles. He also earned the Schutzhund III with decent scores, but we never V-scored”. (The FH, or FährtenHund, is a German sport tracking degree. A V-score is a judge’s rating at or above 96%.)

 

She resurrected the training log (the Canine Scent Work Log) she had created and used when teaching her previous trackers. Her rescue dog V-scored at his first trial and she sent the log to Alpine Publications. Alpine released the book in 2007

TALKIN PETS NEWS
Saturday, Jan. 28, the 28th day of 2012. There are 338 days left in the year.

Man pleaded guilty to dogfighting, weapons possession and distribution of drugs

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced that Jonathan Kennard Williams, 27, was sentenced to 15 years in prison for charges related to dogfighting, weapons possession and drugs distribution in connection to the April 20, 2011 investigation where 41 dogs were seized in Halifax, Va.

In addition to conspiring to sell dogs with the intent for the animals to participate in dogfighting, Williams pleaded guilty to several counts of distributing drugs and weapons possession. Williams was also sentenced to six years probation after his release from prison in U.S. District Court in Danville, Va. yesterday.

“Dogfighting is a heinous crime that has plagued America and become both an animal welfare and public safety issue,” said Terry Mills, Blood Sports director of the ASPCA’s Field Investigations and Response team. “Dogfighting is often associated with other illegal activity such as drugs and weapons,” he added. “Thanks to the diligence of the ATF, the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the local agencies, Mr. Williams was held accountable for exploiting these innocent animals. We hope to continue our work in investigating organized dogfighting and protecting our nation’s animals from this brutal form of cruelty.”

On April 20, 2011, the ASPCA dispatched its Field Investigation and Response team to assist in the rescue, veterinary care and forensics evidence collection of 41 dogs associated with dogfighting. Working under the authority of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and the U.S. Attorney’s Office and in conjunction with Halifax County Animal Control and Campbell County Animal Control, the ASPCA discovered many of the dogs exhibited scars consistent with fighting. The animals did not have access to clean water and appeared to have suffered from various medical conditions.

Following the seizure, the dogs were triaged Dr. Rachel Touroo with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and later behaviorally evaluated by a team led by Dr. Pamela Reid, vice president of the ASPCA’s Animal Behavior Center and a leading expert in the evaluation and rehabilitation of fighting dogs. The ASPCA worked with its shelter response partners to place some of the dogs with individuals and rescue groups; the remaining dogs were placed through Halifax County Animal Control.

The ASPCA Field Investigations and Response team has rescued countless animals from animal fighting investigations across the nation and launched its Blood Sports unit to investigate dogfighting and cockfighting in December 2010. Dogfighting is a blood sport where dogs are exploited and forced to fight as their owners profit from their torture. It is a felony in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

For more information on the ASPCA’s efforts to stop dogfighting, please visit http://www.aspca.org/fight-animal-cruelty/dog-fighting/

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. One million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org.

To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to http://www.twitter.com/aspca.
 

 – Breed is Sixth Coonhound to Gain Full AKC Recognition –

 

New York, NY –The American Kennel Club® (AKC®) expanded its litter of registered breeds on January 1 to welcome the Treeing Walker Coonhound, growing AKC’s family to 174 breeds.

 

"The Treeing Walker is a fast, hot nosed, sensible hunter with a clear, ringing bugle voice," said AKC Spokesperson Lisa Peterson.  "The AKC welcomes this exceptional hunter to our family of breeds.”

 

The Treeing Walker Coonhound was bred originally -- like the other five AKC recognized coonhounds (American English Coonhound, Black and Tan Coonhound, Plott, Bluetick Coonhound and Redbone Coonhound) to help put food on the table.  See coonhounds recognized prior to 2012 on the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship which will be telecast on ABC Network Television on Saturday, February 4, 2012. Check local listings for airtimes. 

 

Historically the Treeing Walker Coonhound hunted raccoon, a principle source of fur and meat during the 19th and 20th centuries.  The breed assisted its owner in the hunt by “treeing” its quarry and announcing to the hunter with its bark that it had been found.  In fact this coon-hunting jargon is the basis of the present day idiom “barking up the wrong tree.”

 

Diane Lewis for AKC

Today the Treeing Walker is known as a fast and sensible hunter with superb endurance. The breed's coat is short, glossy and tri-colored - white, black and tan and requires minimal upkeep.  Intelligent, confident and sociable with family and friends the Treeing Walker thrives with regular exercise.  Be warned though, coonhounds are bred to be heard so if you are considering adding the breed to your household, be prepared for a voice loud enough to carry for miles through the woods.  For more information about this breed, visit the www.akc.org.

Diane Lewis for AKC

To become an AKC recognized breed there needs to be a certain number of dogs geographically distributed throughout the U.S. and an established breed club to watch over them.  Breeds waiting to gain full recognition are recorded in AKC’s Foundation Stock Service® (FSS®).  More information on the process can be found at the AKC’s Web site.

 

Get social with the AKC!  Join us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

###

The American Kennel Club (AKC) proudly celebrated its 125th Anniversary in 2009. Since 1884 the not-for-profit organization has maintained the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world, and today its rules govern more than 20,000 canine competitions each year. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function. Along with its nearly 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Companion Animal Recovery and the AKC Museum of the Dog. For more information, visit www.akc.org.

 

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

 

Four Canine Careers Celebrated on Stamps

  

MERRIFIELD, VA — The U.S. Postal Service celebrates the enduring partnership between dogs and people with the issuance of the 65-cent Dogs at Work set of four stamps. The stamps, good for mailing First-Class Mail weighing up to 2-ounces and square greeting cards subject to additional postage because of their shape, go on sale today at Post Offices nationwide, online at usps.com and by phone at          800-782-6724.

 

“We are proud to commemorate these specialized dogs on stamps,” said U.S. Postal Inspection Service Homeland Security Coordinator Michael T. Butler in dedicating the stamps. “These animals are critical to serving individuals with special needs and critical to enabling successful rescues.” 

 

Joining Butler in dedicating the stamps were Fairfax County Urban Search and Rescue Team/Virginia Task Force 1 Canine Search Specialists Teresa MacPherson with Banks, a Black Lab; and Christine Harrison with Aleko, a Belgium Malinois.

 

“We are honored the Postal Service is paying tribute to these animals that work tirelessly to perform their missions of mercy,” said MacPherson. Task Force 1 has performed more than 60 rescues throughout Central, South and North America, Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

 

Artist John M. Thompson of Syracuse, NY, created original paintings for each stamp in acrylics, based on photographs that he composed. The guide dog depicted is a black Labrador retriever, the tracking dog is a yellow Labrador retriever, the therapy dog is a Welsh springer spaniel, and the search and rescue dog is a German shepherd. Art director Howard E. Paine of Delaplane, VA, designed the stamps.

 

For thousands of years, dogs and humans have shared a special bond. And from the beginning, dogs have been more than just companions and friends — they’ve been vital partners, working side by side with people. While the earliest dogs helped human hunters bring home prey, today’s pooches excel at a variety of jobs, from herding sheep to assisting deaf people to starring in movies.

 

Dogs at Work highlights four different canine careers: guiding, comforting, tracking and searching.

 

Guiding

Some 10,000 people in the U.S. and Canada rely on dogs to “see” the world for them. While the idea of using dogs to guide people who are blind is centuries old, it wasn’t until 1916 that the first organized school for guide dogs was established in Germany. The first canine graduates went on to aid veterans blinded in World War I, and the concept spread around the globe. Guide dogs navigate around obstacles, alert their handlers to curbs and stairs, and even learn to disobey any command that would put their handlers in danger. Along the way, they enrich and empower countless lives. Typical guide dog breeds include Labrador retrievers, golden retrievers, and German shepherds.

 

Comforting

Sometimes the best medicine can come in the form of a furry friend. Therapy dogs, chosen for their friendly dispositions, bring comfort to disaster victims, abused children, the elderly and the ill. Frequent visitors to nursing homes and hospitals, these dogs seem to improve the health and morale of patients just by lending a paw or offering a head to be scratched. Some therapy dogs even make house calls, visiting people who are homebound. An affectionate dog of any breed can become a therapy dog, and there aren’t many requirements — just knowing simple commands and being well behaved around all kinds of people.

 

Tracking

Tracking is just one of the jobs that war dogs are trained for. Loyal canines have fought at the side of U.S. soldiers for more than a century as scouts and sentries. Today, military dogs excel at sniffing out explosive devices. They also protect their handlers at all times. Besides serving as war dogs, tracking dogs work with police and security personnel. They can be trained to detect drugs, guns or explosives and to track people. Several different breeds are often chosen as tracking and sniffing dogs. While airport beagles commonly detect contraband fruit arriving from overseas, German shepherds, Dutch shepherds and Belgian Malinois are preferred by police departments and the military.

 

Searching

When racing against the clock, a search and rescue team’s greatest asset can be a well-trained canine. A dog’s superb sense of smell can speed up a search effort, increasing the odds of survival for lost people and disaster victims. Search and rescue dogs can locate children lost in the woods, sniff out survivors of an earthquake and even dig out people buried in an avalanche. Depending on their training, dogs can track human scents in the air or on the ground. Many different breeds make excellent search and rescue dogs, including bloodhounds, border collies, German shepherds, Labrador retrievers and golden retrievers.

 

The Working Dogs stamps — as well as many of this year’s other stamps — can be viewed on Facebook at facebook.com/USPSStamps, through Twitter @USPSstamps or on the website Beyond the Perf at beyondtheperf.com/2012-preview. Beyond the Perf is the Postal Service’s online site for background on upcoming stamp subjects, first-day-of-issue events and other philatelic news.

 

How to Order the First-Day-of-Issue Postmark

Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at a local Post Office, at The Postal Store website at usps.com/shop or by calling 800-STAMP-24. They should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes (to themselves or others) and place them in larger envelopes addressed to:

 

Dogs at Work Stamp
Postmaster
8409 Lee Highway
Merrifield, VA 22116-9998

 

After applying the first-day-of-issue postmark, the Postal Service will return the envelopes by mail. There is no charge for the postmark. All orders must be postmarked by March 20, 2012.

 

How to Order First-Day Covers

The Postal Service also offers first-day covers for new stamp issues and Postal Service stationery items postmarked with the official first-day-of-issue cancellation. Each item has an individual catalog number and is offered in the quarterly USA Philatelic catalog. Customers may request a free catalog by calling 800-STAMP-24 or writing to:

 

Information Fulfillment

Dept. 6270

U.S. Postal Service

P.O. Box 219014

Kansas City, MO  64121-9014

 

Philatelic Products

There is one philatelic product available for this stamp issue:  115363, First-Day Cover Set of 4, $4.36.

 

The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.

 

# # #

 

A self-supporting government enterprise, the U.S. Postal Service is the only delivery service that reaches every address in the nation, 151 million residences, businesses and Post Office Boxes. The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses, and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations. With 32,000 retail locations and the most frequently visited website in the federal government, usps.com, the Postal Service has annual revenue of more than $65 billion and delivers nearly 40 percent of the world’s mail. If it were a private sector company, the U.S. Postal Service would rank 35th in the 2011 Fortune 500. Black Enterprise and Hispanic Business magazines ranked the Postal Service as a leader in workforce diversity. The Postal Service has been named the Most Trusted Government Agency for six years and the sixth Most Trusted Business in the nation by the Ponemon Institute.

Follow USPS on Twitter @USPS_PR and at Facebook.com/usps.

The Westminster Kennel Club 136th Annual Dog Show

Monday and Tuesday, February 13-14, 2012
Madison Square Garden
Pennsylvania Plaza
Seventh to Eighth Avenues and 31st to 33rd Streets
New York, New York

America's First and Only Champions Only Dog Show Entry limited to 2,000 dogs

Individual breed judging will take place each day between the hours of 8:00AM and 6PM.

All Hound, Toy, Non-Sporting and Herding breeds and varieties will be judged on Monday, with

Groups

judged on Monday evening.

All Sporting, Working, and Terrier breeds and varieties will be judged on Tuesday, with

Groups

judged on Tuesday evening.

Best In Show

will also be judged on Tuesday evening.

All Junior Showmanship preliminaries will be judged on Monday afternoon, with the finals to be held at 7:30PM on Tuesday evening.



Broadcast Information

The Hound, Toy, Non-Sporting, and Herding group competition will be televised live Monday on USA Network from 8-9 PM ET and continuing on CNBC from 9-11 PM ET. The Sporting, Working, Terrier, and Best In Show competition will be televised live Tuesday on USA Network from 8-11 PM ET.

Breed judging highlight videos are available throughout the day on Monday and Tuesday on the Westminster Web site. These highlights will be available after the show, as well.

To our West Coast viewers: Please note that the West Coast telecast is delayed for your time zone. Since results are posted to our Web site as they occur live, if you want to enjoy the drama of the moment, please avoid the Westminster Web site after 5 p.m. Pacific Time on each evening.

More info

Westminster Facts and Figures

  • The Westminster Kennel Club was established in 1877, making it America's oldest organization dedicated to the sport of purebred dogs.

  • First held in 1877, the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is America's second-longest continuously held sporting event, behind only the Kentucky Derby..

  • Westminster pre-dates the invention of the light bulb and the automobile, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Washington Monument, the invention of basketball and the establishment of the World Series.

  • Since Westminster held its first show 133 years ago, there have been 25 men elected president and 12 states have joined the Union. The dog show has outlasted three previous versions of Madison Square Garden, and is currently being staged in MSG IV.

  • The first telecast of Westminster was in 1948, three years before "I Love Lucy" premiered.

  • In 2005, streaming video with same day coverage of breed judging highlights was made available for the first time on the Westminster web site (www.westminsterkennelclub.org). It was an immediate and huge hit.

  • A portion of the proceeds from Westminster's first show in 1877 was donated to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) to establish a home for stray and disabled animals.

  • The Empire State Building first honored Westminster by lighting its tower in the Westminster colors of purple and gold in 2004 and will do so again in 2012.

  • There have been a total of 301,650 dogs entered in Westminster's 134 shows through 2011

  • Through the 2011 show, there have been 1,705 judges who have officiated at least once at Westminster, some as many as 23 times, at Westminster.

  • Two dogs have won Best In Show at both Westminster and Crufts in Birmingham, England, each of them winning at the English show before coming to the America: the Lakeland Terrier, Ch. Stingray of Derryabah (Crufts 1967, WKC 1968) and the Kerry Blue Terrier, Ch. Torums Scarf Michael (Crufts 2000, WKC 2003).

  • Only one time has the offspring of a Best In Show winner duplicated the feat. In 2000, the English Springer Spaniel Ch. Salilyn N' Erin's Shameless repeated the 1993 BIS accomplishment of her sire, Ch. Salilyn's Condor.

  • Two Best In Show winners, Norwich Terriers, had the same sire: 1994's Ch. Chidley's Willum the Conqueror and 1998's Ch. Fairewood Frolic were offspring (half brother/sister) of Ch. Royal Rock Don of Chidley

  • The Papillon, Ch. Loteki Supernatural Being ("Kirby"), is the only dog to capture Best In Show at the World Dog Show (1998 in Helsinki) and Best In Show at Westminster (1999).

  • In 2009, Ch. Clussexx Three D Grinchy Glee, a Sussex Spaniel, became the oldest dog to capture Best In Show at 10 years, 2 months and 9 days of age in 2009. The youngest winner was the Rough Collie, Laund Loyalty of Bellhaven, who captured the award in 1929 at the age of exactly 9 months.

  • Westminster was established in 1877, pre-dating the founding of the governing body of the sport, the American Kennel Club, which was established in 1884.

  • In 1884, The Westminster Kennel Club became the first member of the American Kennel Club.

 Jan. 18, 2012

 EAST LANSING, Mich. — Plagued with a defective heart valve that caused fluid accumulation in his lungs, Leo was in need of serious medical help.

 His loved ones opted for open-heart surgery. And after a successful operation, Leo is recovering nicely and leading a full life: Chasing balls, chewing toys and barking at friends.

 Leo, a nearly 2-year-old Australian Shepherd from Ann Arbor, was the first dog to undergo open-heart surgery last fall at Michigan State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Since then, Augusta Pelosi, a cardiac surgeon with the College of Veterinary Medicine, has led a team of more than 20 veterinary and human health experts in performing two more successful open-heart canine surgeries.

 She is one of the few veterinary cardiac surgeons in the world who performs the rare surgery on companion animals.

 “Our service provides an alternative that can save lives,” said Pelosi, who joined the college’s Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences in 2008 after previously completing residencies in surgery and cardiology at MSU with pioneer veterinary surgeon George Eyster. “Medications can be used to treat a variety of cardiac conditions, but sometimes they can only do so much and come with side effects.

 “The only way to fully correct many cardiac defects is to target the problem itself with open-heart surgery.”

 After several years of training and research, Pelosi now leads about 20 veterinary professionals – specializing in critical care to cardiology to anesthesia – as part of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital’s open-heart team. Pelosi also partners with human health professionals from the University of Michigan’s cardiac surgery team.

 The result: A world-class team of experts performing surgeries for dogs to correct congenital and acquired diseases ranging from deformed valves in the heart to the abnormal narrowing of vessels.  

 In Leo’s case, he came to MSU for correction of a dysplastic mitral valve, a condition where a valve in his heart did not form properly during development and resulted in improper closure and fluid congestion of the lungs.

 Despite good response to medication, Leo’s condition progressed and would have shortened his life expectancy. Bari Olivier, an MSU cardiology section chief, recommended surgery to correct Leo’s condition.

 During surgery, a mitral valve ring was placed and secured in Leo’s heart to provide support to the valve, thus eliminating blood from flowing back into the atrium. After surgery, Leo was assigned to the critical care group of the open heart team led by Amy Koenigshof.

 Leo was assisted by a mechanical ventilator for a night; one week later he returned home and continues to do well. His owners report he is now eating normally and taking short walks outside.

 While the surgeries are of course risky, many owners are willing to provide the best services available for their pets. After surgery, dogs with cardiac defects often fully recover and go on to enjoy a normal life, Pelosi said.

“There is a perception that heart surgery does not work for animals,” she said. “In human cardiac surgeries, this perception also existed many years ago. We have the need, we have the skills and we have the ability to do it successfully.

 “While surgery is not an alternative to medical treatment or interventional procedures, it is an option that should be offered to our patients when it is the superior treatment option or other options have failed.”

 For more information on the MSU College of Veterinary Medicine and the services offered at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, go to http://cvm.msu.edu/.

 ###

 Michigan State University has been working to advance the common good in uncommon ways for more than 150 years. One of the top research universities in the world, MSU focuses its vast resources on creating solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges, while providing life-changing opportunities to a diverse and inclusive academic community through more than 200 programs of study in 17 degree-granting colleges.

 For MSU news on the Web, go to news.msu.edu. Follow MSU News on Twitter at twitter.com/MSUnews.

DOG PHOTOGRAPHY FOR DUMMIES®

By Kim Rodgers & Sarah Sypniewski

 

(HOBOKEN, NJ) October 18, 2011 – If your dog has ever done something adorable and you’ve wished you had a photo of it, say no more--Dummies has the book for you. Dog Photography For Dummies gives you practical guidance for capturing your dog's personality and turning ordinary shots into priceless memories that will last a lifetime.

 

Dog Photography For Dummies (Wiley, 978-1-1180-7775-7, Nov. 2011) covers the latest and greatest gadgets and accessories available to capture and alter photos of your favorite pooch. The book offers techniques that both amateurs and intermediates can use to improve their photography skills, in addition to great examples of dog portraiture and tons of ideas for fun new places to pose your furry friend.

 

The book provides advice on:

 

     How to get your dog to sit still

     How to photograph a shy dog that is afraid of the camera

     Making the most of natural light

     How to photograph people and dogs together

 

Whether for memories, decorating, or holiday cards, Dog Photography For Dummies makes it easy to capture the best of your four-legged friend.

 

About the authors:

Kim Rodgers and Sarah Sypniewski are the co-founders of Bark Pet Photography, a Los Angeles based pet photography business with an underlying mission of giving back to local animal rescue organizations. Their work has been seen in places like PEOPLEPets.com, Laist.com, TMZ, People Style Watch Magazine, and Dogs Today Magazine. Voted best pet photographer in the Los Angeles area in 2011, Bark Pet Photography has gone from a small idea to a full-fledged business and industry leader.

 

Dog Photography For Dummies®

By Kim Rodgers and Sarah Sypniewski

Wiley / 978-1-1180-7775-7/ Nov. 2011

For more info, visit www.dummies.com

 

About For Dummies®

After nearly 20 years and with more than 200 million copies printed, For Dummies is the world’s bestselling reference series, well known for enriching people’s lives by making knowledge accessible in a fun and easy way.  Loyal customers around the globe agree that For Dummies is “more than a publishing phenomenon … [it is] a sign of the times,” [The New York Times].  The books span every section of the bookstore, covering topics from health to history, music to math, sports to self-help, technology to travel and more. The For Dummies brand presence is further expanded with the addition of eBooks, a corporate custom publishing program, a robust consumer website and a licensed product line that includes consumer electronics, culinary, crafts, video, software, musical instrument packs, home improvement, automotive, game and more.  For more information, visit Dummies.com. For Dummies is a branded imprint of Wiley.

Dogs from 50 States and More Than 45 Countries

 Vie for $225,000 at the Largest Dog Show in the Country

 

Event Broadcast airs on ABC Network Television

 Saturday, Feb. 4, 2012

NEW YORK, NY (November 30, 2011) – A record 3,938 dogs will compete for more than $225,000 in cash prizes at the eleventh annual AKC/Eukanuba National Championship (AENC) on December 17 and 18, 2011 in Orlando, Florida. The two-day event is held in conjunction with the AKC Agility Invitational, the AKC National Obedience Invitational (with entries of 592 and 146 respectively including our first-ever All-American Dogs), the Juniors events (159 conformation + 47 obedience + 50 agility entries) and the Eukanuba World Challenge (44 participants), making for a record-breaking combined entry of 4,976 for all events.

“We’re thrilled to welcome everyone to the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship. Not only is it the largest invitation-only dog show in our history, but it is the largest dog show in the country this year,” said Show Chairman Ron Menaker. “This unique event enables AKC to reach out to the public in unprecedented ways to promote the sport and educate families about dogs.”  

The Orange County Convention Center will also host several local kennel club dog shows in the days leading up to the main event. The Space Coast Kennel Club of Palm Bay, Brevard Kennel Club and Central Florida Kennel Club shows will precede the AENC on Dec. 14-16, 2011, making for five full days of dog shows. 

AKC/EUKANUBA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP BY THE NUMBERS

·         173 AKC recognized breeds are entered to compete.

·         The largest entries include:

o   64 Boston Terriers

o   61 Vizslas

o   58 French Bulldogs 

o   57 Rhodesian Ridgebacks

o   56 Retrievers (Labrador)

o   51 Australian Shepherds

o   50 Havanese

o   50 Retrievers (Golden)

o   48 Dachshunds (Longhaired)

o   46 Rottweilers

o   45 Pugs

o   44 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

o   44 Border Collies

·         The newest breeds to compete include:

o      3 American English Coonhounds

o      5 Entlebucher Mountain Dogs  

o      9 Finnish Lapphunds

o      8 Cesky Terriers

o    11 Norwegian Lundehunds

o    12 Xoloitzcuintli

·         All 14 AKC Miscellaneous Breeds will be represented.

·         More than 130 “Veterans” (between 7 & 12 years old) are entered. 

·         AKC Meet the Breeds® will feature 166 breeds at decorated booths staffed by experts. (Sat. & Sun. from 10 am to 4 pm)

·         By group, entry totals are: Sporting – 637; Hound – 526; Working – 605; Terrier – 441; Toy – 527; Non-Sporting – 469, Herding – 491 and Miscellaneous – 68

·         Dogs from 44 countries will compete in the Eukanuba World Challenge including Mexico, Australia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. The Eukanuba World Challenge is a one-of-a-kind event offering top dogs from around the world, and the winner of the Eukanuba Breeders’ Stakes, the opportunity to compete for the title of “Eukanuba World Challenge Champion” and a total of $15,000 in prize money.

·         Judge Mrs. Polly Smith of St. Stephens Church, Virginia will select the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship Best in Show (BIS) winner. The owner(s) of the BIS winner will receive more than $50,000 while the breeder(s) of the Best in Show winner will be awarded $15,000.

·         Mr. James Reynolds of Nepean, Ontario, Canada will select Best Bred-By Exhibitor in Show from among 1,328 dogs (35% of the total entry) entered in the Bred-by-Exhibitor (dogs being shown by their owner/breeder) competition, who will be eligible to win the $15,000 cash prize. Same-day streaming video coverage of all regular and bred-by groups and evening events will be provided on akc.org.

·         159 youngsters, ages 9-17, who have met high academic standards and qualification criteria based on year-round competition, will compete in Junior Showmanship.

·         Mrs. Zena Thorn Andrews, also a renowned breeder/judge of Dachshunds, will replace Tamas Jakkel to judge Dachshunds (Longhaired).  

·         Ms. Carla M.S. Molinari will judge Sari Brewster Tietjen’s entire assignment.

AGILITY AND OBEDIENCE INVITATIONALS BY THE NUMBERS

·         592 entries in the AKC Agility Invitational - 157 breeds from 46 states. Eukanuba and J & J Dog are proud sponsors of the AKC Agility Invitational.

·         146 entries in the AKC National Obedience Invitational - 55 breeds from 33 states and Canada. Eukanuba and J & J Dog are proud sponsors of the AKC National Obedience Invitational.

·         50 Juniors competing at the AKC National Juniors Agility Competition on Friday, Dec. 16th (8 am to 11 am).

·         48 Juniors competing at the AKC National Juniors Obedience Competition on Saturday, Dec. 17th (8 am to 3 pm).

·         9 All-American Dogs competing in Agility and 6 in Obedience.

To purchase tickets and get more information about the show visit www.akc.org/aenc. To receive daily updates and show results via Facebook, visit www.facebook.com/aenc and www.facebook.com/americankennelclub.  

#  #  #

The American Kennel Club (AKC), founded in 1884, maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world. Its rules and regulations govern more than 20,000 canine competitions each year.

         

 

Page 59 of 61