Displaying items by tag: canine cancer

When clinicians at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine began caring for Scout in July 2019, they had no idea they would soon inspire, and appear in, a Super Bowl commercial. But they had a canine star on their hands, and a very appreciative client who set in motion the ad’s production. As Super Bowl LIV airs Sunday, Feb. 2, on FOX, Scout will appear alongside members of the school’s faculty and staff who have been part of the 7-year-old golden retriever’s cancer treatment journey. The new 30-second commercial, titled “Lucky Dog,” will air during the game’s second quarter and was paid for by WeatherTech, manufacturer of automotive accessories and home and pet care products. Scout is a member of the family of WeatherTech founder and CEO David MacNeil. The ad follows Scout’s journey as a cancer survivor, celebrates the work being done at the UW School of Veterinary Medicine, and encourages viewers to donate to the school’s cancer research efforts at weathertech.com/donate. Cancer is the number one cause of illness and death in the aging dog population. Having lost his last three dogs to cancer and with Scout now also affected by the disease, efforts to advance life-saving treatments and technology are close to MacNeil.

Last summer, however, tragedy struck when Scout collapsed at home. He was rushed to his local animal hospital, where an ultrasound revealed a tumor on his heart. Scout was given a grave prognosis: a life expectancy of no more than one month. He was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma, an aggressive cancer of blood vessel walls.

Searching for more information, Scout and his family rushed to UW Veterinary Care on the recommendation of their local veterinarian. There, specialists with the emergency and critical care and oncology teams stabilized Scout’s condition and arrived at a cutting-edge treatment plan. In mid-July, he began chemotherapy at UW Veterinary Care, followed by radiation therapy targeting his heart tumor. He also received immunotherapy aimed at stimulating his immune system to attack cells expressing specific tumor proteins. Just a month later, Scout and his family received good news: His heart tumor had decreased in size by 78 percent. By September, the tumor was 90 percent smaller than its original size. Today, Scout’s heart tumor has all but disappeared.

Dogs and people not only share similar cancer rates — about one in four dogs and one in three people will develop cancer in their lifetime — but naturally occurring tumors in dogs often share almost identical characteristics to human cancers in terms of recurrence and spread (metastasis), response to treatment and more. Past clinical studies at the School of Veterinary Medicine have yielded new technologies and treatments with better effectiveness and less toxicity. For instance, successful clinical trials in pet dogs with naturally occurring nasal tumors in the early 2000s at UW Veterinary Care led to widespread use of TomoTherapy in human medicine. This state-of-the-art machine, developed at UW–Madison, uses CT-guided radiation treatments to attack cancer with pinpoint accuracy while sparing nearby healthy tissues — a form of treatment that Scout benefited from. Funds raised by the Super Bowl commercial (100 percent of gifts) will be used to support research at the School of Veterinary Medicine to better diagnose, treat and prevent cancer and for the purchase of specialized equipment that will aid clinicians and researchers in identifying new cancer-fighting drugs and treatments — discoveries that are shared with the world.

 

RALEIGH, NC (April 30, 2019) - The American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation (CHF) marks Pet Cancer Awareness Month this May with the launch of their Canine Cancer Research Initiative. The focus of this initiative is to direct research funding that will advance understanding, treatment and prevention of canine cancer to benefit dogs. With almost $2.3 million already invested in currently active canine cancer research, new oncology grants were recently awarded to study brain tumors, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and lymphoma, including:

  • 02663: Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium (CBTC) Meningioma Pathology Board
  • 02643-A:  Examination of the Effects of Cannabidiol on Canine Neoplastic Cell Apoptosis/Autophagy and Chemotherapy Resistance or Sensitivity
  • 02642-A:  NF-kappaB Inactivation Enhances Apoptosis in Canine Osteosarcoma Cells
  • 02636-A:  Development of RNA in-situ Hybridization to Identify T Regulatory Cells and their Function within the Tumor Microenvironment of Canine Oral Malignant Melanoma
  • 02595-A:  Defining the Flow Cytometric Characteristics of Normal and Diseased Canine Spleen and Visceral Lymph Nodes 

These studies complement ongoing canine cancer studies for hemangiosarcoma, lymphoma, bladder cancer, and more. Information on all active studies can be found in CHF's Research Grants Portfolio, including studies funded through CHF's Hemangiosarcoma Research Initiative.“The AKC Canine Health Foundation has a longstanding commitment to canine cancer research. The Canine Cancer Research Initiative provides an opportunity to advance our understanding of cancer in dogs while also exploring new targets for their diagnosis and treatment,” states Dr. Diane Brown, CHF Chief Executive Officer. “With the support generated through this initiative, CHF can resource more research to help dogs while also informing a comparative oncology aspect to the same cancers that affect people. Together with our donors, we are making progress in the fight against cancer.”The increase in canine cancer research funding is bolstered by the American Kennel Club’s pledge to match donations to the CHF Canine Cancer Research Initiative with an equal donation to CHF for canine health research up to $250,000 in 2019.Since 1995, CHF has invested more than $13 million to study canine cancer in search of ways to diagnose cancer earlier and treat it more effectively. Learn more about AKC Canine Health Foundation’s Canine Cancer Research Initiative and join the fight against cancer at akcchf.org/caninecancer.

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About AKC Canine Health Foundation
Since 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science to address the health needs of all dogs. With more than $46 million in funding to date, the Foundation provides grants for the highest quality canine health research and shares information on the discoveries that help prevent, treat and cure canine diseases. The Foundation meets and exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, as demonstrated by their highest four-star Charity Navigator rating and GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency. Learn more at www.akcchf.org.

 

   

Established in 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation's (CHF) mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding scientific research and supporting the dissemination of health information to prevent, treat and cure canine disease.

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