Displaying items by tag: california

THE ROAR FOUNDATION SHAMBALA PRESERVE

The Roar Foundation, which I founded as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization in 1983, exists solely to support The Shambala Preserve. Our mission is to educate the public about the dangers of private ownership of exotic animals. Huge numbers of exotic dangerous animals are bred and sold in the United States for illegal purposes. Private ownership presents a grave danger to the public and is cruel and unfair to these animals. More stringent legislation is needed to prohibit breeding and selling. We are actively involved in legislating this on federal and state levels.

Prior to 1983 I had been rescuing the exotic felines since 1972. Up to the present, The Shambala Preserve has given sanctuary to over 235 exotic felines - lion, tiger, cougar, black and spotted leopard, serval, bobcat, Asian leopard cat, snow leopard, cheetah, lynx, tigon, liger and African elephant. All have come to the Preserve after confiscation by authorities, such as California Fish and Game, U.S. Department of Agriculture, SPCA and Humane Societies. They are from roadside zoos and private citizens who realize they have purchased an animal they can no longer handle.

The exotic cat trade is a huge business. According to US. Fish and Wildlife it is on a par with illegal drugs. Once an animal is brought to Shambala, it remains here for the remainder of its life. As a true sanctuary, we do not buy, breed, sell, trade, or subject them to commercial use. Our only purpose is to allow these magnificent animals to live out their lives with care, understanding and dignity. Each has the best human, nutritional, medical, emotional and mental care possible.

There are many ways you can support The Roar Foundation: become a Member of the Roar Foundation, Adopt a Wild One, provide an item from the Shambala Wish List; attend a Safari Tour: visit The Trading Post, become a volunteer, attend one of our hugely popular and unique Sunset Safaris, and for a truly memorable experience, spend an entire night in one of Shambala’s authentic African Tents! All of these help to further Shambala’s educational efforts and support our mission. One special weekend a month, we hold the Safaris where Shambala opens the gates to the public for a small admission fee (by reservation only). All guests must be 18-yrs or older. Please come visit us and support our beautiful Wild Ones.

Shambala is a Sanskrit word that means: “A Meeting Place of Peace and Harmony for all Beings, Animal and Human.”

Tippi Hedren
President The Roar Foundation
The Shambala Preserve

 

 


Cyrus, Xhosa and Zoe

Shambala is home to over 40 big cats: lions, tigers, cougars, black and spotted leopards, servals, bobcats, and Asian leopard cats, who live out their lives at Shambala. All have come to the Preserve after confiscation by authorities such as California Fish and Game, the United States Department of Agriculture, the ASCPA, and various Humane Societies. They are from roadside zoos and private citizens who realize that they have purchased an animal that they can no longer handle. The exotic cat trade is a huge business, just under illegal drugs, according to U.S. Fish and Wildlife.


Jazzy and Tabbi


Alexander

Once an animal is brought to Shambala, it remains here for the rest of its life. As a true sanctuary, we do not buy, breed, sell, trade, or subject our animals to commercial use. Our only purpose is to allow these magnificent animals to live out their lives with love and dignity. Each "Wild One" has the best human, nutritional, medical, emotional, and mental care possible.

There are many ways you can support The Roar Foundation: you can "Join Our Pride" by becoming a member, become a "Wild Parent" through our adoption program, donate an item from our Wish List, attend a Safari Tour or an exclusive Sunset Safari, visit the Trading Post, volunteer, and for a truly memorable experience, an overnight Safari in one of our African tents!


Savannah

For decades, Tippi Hedren's luminous beauty radiated from the silver screen, enchanting moviegoers and cementing her position among Hollywood's elite-beauty and star power that endure to this day. For too long Hedren's story has been told by others through whispered gossip and tabloid headlines. Now, in Tippi (William Morrow; hardcover; $28.99; on-sale: 11/1/16) Hedren sets the record straight, recalling how a young and virtuous Lutheran girl from small-town Minnesota became a worldwide legend-as one of the most famous “Hitchcock girls,” as an unwavering animal activist, and as the matriarch of a powerful Hollywood dynasty that includes her movie star daughter Melanie Griffith, and rising star Dakota Johnson, her granddaughter.For the first time, Hedren digs deep into her complicated relationship with the man who discovered her talent, director Alfred Hitchcock, the generous benefactor who would become a repulsive and controlling director who contractually controlled her every move for many years. She speaks openly about the dark pain she endured working with him on their most famous collaborations, The Birds and Marnie, and how as a single mother while shielded her daughter from her struggles on and off Hitchcock's set.Difficult as her experiences with Hitchcock were, they nearly paled in comparison to her time on the set of Roar-a film starring dozens of live lions and tigers that has become one of the most notorious film productions of all time. Including never before revealed details about the unbelievable making of the movie, Tippi describes how what began as a simple movie about big cats evolved into a sprawling, dangerous endeavor that consumed her career and often put lives, including hers and her family's, at risk. Tippi offers a clear-eyed and surprising look at the perilous chances they took, while also recounting how these events led to years of animal rights activism, culminating in the creation of her very own big cats preserve, Shambala. And yet, through it all, Tippi shows how her career and life have continued to embody her unwavering devotion-to her daughter Melanie, to her animal rights activism, to her humanitarian relief work overseas, and to her art.Hedren's incandescent spirit shines through as she talks about working with the great Charlie Chaplin, sharing the screen with some of the most esteemed actors in Hollywood, her experiences on some of the most intriguing and troubling film sets-including filming Roar, one of the most dangerous movies ever made-and the struggles of being a single mother-balancing her dedication to her work and her devotion to her daughter-and her commitment to helping animals.Filled with sixteen pages of beautiful photos, Tippi is a rare and fascinating look at a private woman's remarkable life no fan can miss.

 

Law is first of its kind in the nation; prohibits breeding and capture of orcas

Washington, D.C., September 14, 2016 -- Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, commends California governor Jerry Brown for signing S.B. 839 yesterday: a budget bill that includes the California Orca Protection Act. Authored by Assembly member Richard Bloom (D-50), this law bans the possession, capture, export, and breeding of orcas in California, with an exemption for orcas currently held in captivity.

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, “California is setting a momentous precedent by becoming the first state in the nation to outlaw breeding and future possession of orcas. This legislative remedy remains urgently necessary, even after SeaWorld’s major announcement on March 17 that it would immediately end the breeding program for its orcas globally and phase out its theatrical orca shows by 2019. The California Orca Protection Act is an essential next step to legally codify SeaWorld’s business decision, and also prevent other corporations from filling this newly vacant entertainment space. It ensures that the 11 orcas in San Diego are the last generation of captive orcas displayed in the state.”

Orcas are unsuited to captivity and suffer enormously in marine parks. These remarkably intelligent animals swim 100 miles per day in the wild and have profound relationships with their family pods. In the wild, the average lifespan is 30 years for males and 46 years for females, although they have been known to live 90 years. Captive orcas are susceptible to a range of ailments and issues that cause misery and drastically shorten their lives. Mental anguish takes a severe toll and orcas have been known to self-mutilate out of boredom and desperation. Most die before they reach age 25 in tanks that are only 1/10,000th of one percent the size of their natural home ranges.

Roberts adds, “The needs of these smart and social animals cannot be met at all in captivity. Great progress has been made for orcas this year, and California’s new law is another groundbreaking step toward ending orca captivity entirely. Born Free USA hopes other states will follow California and pass similar compassionate legislation to empty the tanks.”

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, the organization leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic “pets,” trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to North America the message of “compassionate conservation”—the vision of the United Kingdom-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free USA’s mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

 

California becomes second state to outlaw cruel weapon used to control elephants

Washington, D.C., August 30, 2016 -- Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, commends California’s Governor Jerry Brown for signing S.B. 1062 yesterday to ban the use of bullhooks and other weapons designed to inflict pain for the purpose of training or controlling the behavior of an elephant. Introduced by Senator Ricardo Lara (D-33), the law will go into effect on January 1, 2018.

A bullhook is a long, thick pole with a sharp metal hook attached to the end, used to inflict pain as negative reinforcement. It is a common, yet highly notorious weapon in the elephant trainer’s arsenal. California is the second state in the nation to pass a prohibition on bullhooks, following Rhode Island’s precedent-setting law in July.

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, “We are seeing a groundswell of public support across the country for ending the use of cruel bullhooks as the public becomes increasingly concerned about the welfare of performing animals—and legislators from coast to coast are responding. Bullhooks and other weapons used by trainers produce unimaginable suffering in elephants who are forced to submit to unnatural acts before an audience day after day, year after year. There is no justification for causing this type of physical and mental anguish.”

In addition, numerous elephant experts claim that sharp implements can do severe damage to elephants’ thick but highly sensitive skin. Trainers often embed the bullhook into the soft tissue behind the ears, inside the ear or mouth, under the trunk and chin, in the armpit area, on the back of the legs, in and around the anus, and in tender spots around the feet. The fear that the bullhook instills in elephants means they will, under duress, do everything possible to escape further blows. Its cruel power to implement negative reinforcement techniques explains why the bullhook has historically been a ubiquitous weapon for circus trainers. After that type of abuse, simply holding the bullhook near the elephant when in front of an audience is threatening enough to compel obedience.

“We thank Senator Lara for sponsoring this crucial legislation and applaud Governor Brown for making the compassionate choice to sign it into law,” says Roberts. “This is a momentous step forward in the fight to end brutality against performing animals, and I hope other states will follow California’s example without delay.”

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic "pets," trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to America the message of "compassionate conservation": the vision of the U.K.-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free's mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

 

Coat made from 20 foxes to be repurposed as part of Born Free USA’s global Fur for the Animals campaign

Washington, D.C., August 8, 2016 -- Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, recently received what was thought to be a lynx fur coat as part of the Born Free USA Fur for the Animals campaign. After further investigation at a furrier by Born Free USA, it was determined to be an arctic fox fur coat, dyed to look like a lynx, made from up to 20 fox pelts originating in Finland. Born Free USA sent the coat to the Fund for Animals Wildlife Center in Ramona, California, where it and other fur donations from the campaign are being used to comfort 28 orphaned coyote pups and additional baby wildlife.

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, “Without a doubt, the foxes who died for this coat were born and held in miserable captivity on a Finnish fur farm. They were not allowed to run, play, or feed naturally. Simply put, they were not allowed to be foxes; their paws almost certainly never even touched the grass. Instead, they would have been driven mad by spending their entire lives in crowded, unsanitary, and painful wire cages: a fate shared by the millions of animals imprisoned in fur farms today.”

Due to the global success of Born Free USA’s Fur for the Animals campaign, the organization continues to receive fur donations every week from people who refuse to wear fur they have acquired: coats, stoles, hats, scarves, rugs, pillows, toys, etc. After receiving them, Born Free USA ships the items to wildlife rehabilitators across the country to use for supporting and comforting the baby animals in their care.

“Fur only comes from tortuous death,” Roberts explains. “The methods fur farms use to kill their victims are unspeakably cruel. Now, this coat that came from so much cruelty will be used to comfort coyote pups who, once rehabilitated, will potentially get the chance to live full lives in the wild. While the symmetry and symbolism is not lost on us, it would be far better if these foxes never had to die for fashion in the first place.”  

The lynx-dyed fox coat was included in a large shipment of fur donations Born Free USA sent to the Fund for Animals Wildlife Center. The center is currently caring for 28 orphaned coyote pups, many themselves victims of wildlife conflict and lethal control. The parents of six of these pups were killed for getting ‘too close’ to a residential neighborhood. Two others were found wandering alone after their mother was hit and killed by a car.

According to Ali Crumpacker, Director of The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center, “This coat, which needlessly killed so many animals, will now help many more on their journey to recovery and rerelease into the wild. While we are grateful for the opportunity to give a better ending to this tragic story, we continue to hope for a future in which fur is never taken from its original owner, and wildlife conflicts are resolved in a humane manner that doesn’t result in overwhelming numbers of vulnerable, orphaned wildlife.”

In addition to the coat, Born Free USA has shipped other donated fur pieces to The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center over the past year, which has helped comfort: 54 skunks, 141 Virginia opossums, 38 coyotes, 4 bobcats, 5 bears, 1 gray fox, 1 mountain lion, and dozens of others in need.

About Born Free USA: Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic “pets,” trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to North America the message of “compassionate conservation”—the vision of the United Kingdom-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free USA’s mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

About The Fund for Animals: The Fund for Animals operates the nation’s largest and most diverse network of animal care centers. An affiliate of The Humane Society of the United States, The Fund for Animals provides hands-on care and safe haven for more than 3,000 animals representing 150 species each year, including those rescued from cruelty and neglect, victims of the exotic pet trade, injured and orphaned wildlife, refugees from research labs, and many more, and works to prevent cruelty through advocacy and education. For more information, visit fundforanimals.org. The Fund for Animals’ animal care centers include · Cleveland Amory Black Beauty Ranch in Texas · Fund for Animals Wildlife Center in California · Cape Wildlife Center in Massachusetts · Duchess Sanctuary in Oregon.

 

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Oakland, CA…May 24, 2016 – Construction of the Oakland Zoo’s new California Trail expansion, including a new state-of-the-art visitor center, is in full swing thanks to a generous $3 million grant from Kaiser Permanente’s fund at the East Bay Community Foundation.

Slated to open in Spring 2017, the Kaiser Permanente Visitor Center at Oakland Zoo’s California Trail serves as the entry point to the developing 56-acre expansion; with Zoo guests arriving via Northern California’s first urban gondola offering awe-inspiring views of the entire SF Bay Area. The 15,500 square foot building will also feature viewing decks from 625 feet above sea level and the upper level will house an expansive, family-friendly restaurant.

“The California Trail at Oakland Zoo will be the first-ever of its kind, giving almost a million visitors each year the opportunity to connect with and learn about many California native species, like the Grizzly bear, that vanished from our lands so long ago,” said Dr. Joel Parrott, President & CEO of Oakland Zoo, “We are so pleased to have Kaiser Permanente’s name added to this monumental structure which will serve as the first experience for guests exploring the many attractions of the California Trail.”

In addition to securing naming rights to the Kaiser Permanente Visitors Center, the organization’s investment will support two prominent educational programs for youth at the Zoo, the Teen Wild Guide program and Field Biology workshops. Both programs offer Bay Area tweens and teens long-term, hands-on learning and research opportunities focused on conservation and wildlife both at the Zoo and beyond.

“Kaiser Permanente is committed to improving the health of the communities we serve,” explained Vice President of External and Community Relations Yvette Radford. “We’re excited to help support the Oakland Zoo’s California Trail because it encourages people of all ages to enjoy outdoor physical activity and appreciate the beauty and environmental diversity of our incredible state.”  

As construction continues on the Kaiser Permanente Visitor Center and all of the exhibits and attractions within the California Trail, several naming opportunities remain for the many new habitats, viewing stations, pavilion, classroom and the only one of its kind in Northern California – urban gondola. The first animal residents are anticipated in the fall of this year with the addition of twenty American Bison from the Blackfeet Nation tribe in Montana. Other animals will be added to the Zoo family from both rescue situations and other Zoos in need of relocating animals. The California Trail is slated to open to the public in 2018.

**Click here for large versions of above images**

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ABOUT CALIFORNIA TRAIL AT OAKLAND ZOO:

California Trail brings to life the rich natural history of California in a whole new way.  Designed to be more like a wild animal park, California Trail will feature the state's historic and iconic animal species in large exhibits, including grey wolves, grizzly bears, jaguars, mountain lions, bald eagles, California condors, black bears, and American bison. Through the California Trail experience, Oakland Zoo presents a dynamic and inspiring story about finding balance in how we steward our state's natural legacy. Interactive features along the Trail will help to complete the animals' stories with a vision for their healthy future in the wild and opportunities for you to help them thrive. For more information, go to: www.californiatrail.org

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area's award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid's activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to the humane treatment of animals and wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide; with 25¢ from each ticket donated to support conservation partners and programs around the world. The California Trail, a transformational project that more than doubles our size, opens in 2018, and will further our commitment to animal care, education, and conservation with a focus on this state’s remarkable native wildlife. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information, go to: www.oaklandzoo.org

TPR News
Saturday, May 21, the 142nd day of 2016. There are 224 days left in the year.CREW
Jon Patch - Host
Jillyn Sidlo - Co Host
Lexi Lapp - Producer
Ben Boquist - Network Producer
Bob Page - Executive Producer
Special Guest:  PetStaurant Owner and Founder of The Animal Hope and Wellness Foundation, Marc Ching, will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 5/21/16 at 5pm EST to discuss Japanese herbal and holistic nuitrition for pets as well as his efforts to save animals

 
 

(Washington, D.C., March 9, 2016)Fourteen timber sales in the Klamath National Forest approved by the USDA Forest Service late last month have received permission from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to take* up to 103Northern Spotted Owls, a subspeciesalready in steep decline.The Westside project, approved on Feb. 29, proposes extensive post-fire salvage logging, 70 percent of which is in forest reserves designated by the Northwest Forest Plan as areas for wildlife conservation and forest restoration.

“According to analysis by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, habitat will be removed from up to 57 areas where Northern Spotted Owls are known to nest,” said George Fenwick, President of American Bird Conservancy. “The large number of Spotted Owls being put at risk by this project—and the amount of habitat being taken from the owl reserves—is an unreasonable risk to the population and should not have been approved.”

The project, which is in a 187,000-acre area in northern California affected by wildfires in 2014, is inconsistent with government research indicating the owls will often continue nesting in burned forests. They also frequently forage in these areas due to abundant prey. The Northern Spotted Owl’s Recovery Plan calls for conserving large standing dead trees used by the owls for nesting.

“These large snags take a long time to form on the landscape and are currently in short supply,” said Steve Holmer, ABC’s Senior Policy Advisor. “If the Westside plan proceeds, this essential owl habitat will be lost.”

According to the Forest Service, the Westside timber sales are intended to protect public safety, reduce hazardous fuels, and provide for economic use of burned timber. The sales include 5,570 acres of salvage harvest, 12,700 acres of tree planting, 320 miles of roadside hazard treatment, and 24,450 acres of hazardous fuels reduction, including 11,180 acres of prescribed burn.

“We at American Bird Conservancy urge the Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reconsider the salvage portion of the Westside decision,” said Fenwick. “We ask then to adopt a more conservative approach to managing Northern Spotted Owl Critical Habitat and to ensure that similar projects putting so many of the threatened owls at risk are not approved in the future.

“A better post-fire management strategy has already been suggested by the Karuk Tribe,” Fenwick continued. “This strategy focuses on protecting human safety by removing hazard trees along roads and targeting fire risk-reduction activities around nearby communities.”

The Northern Spotted Owl population is in steep decline, according to the latest population study released last year by the Forest Service. This research indicates that since monitoring began in 1985, Spotted Owl populations declined 55-77 percent in Washington, 31-68 percent in Oregon, and 32-55 percent in California. In addition, population declines are now occurring in study areas in southern Oregon and northern California that were previously experiencing little to no detectable decline through 2009.

* “Take” is defined by the Endangered Species Act as harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect any threatened or endangered species. This includes significant habitat modification or degradation that results in death or injury to listed species by significantly impairing behavioral patterns such as breeding, feeding, or sheltering. In this case, the take of 74 adult owls and 12-29 juveniles could result from the Westside project by reducing the amount of nesting, roosting, and foraging habitat below recommended minimums, and the loss of young due to disturbance during the breeding season.

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American Bird Conservancy is the Western Hemisphere's bird conservation specialist—the only organization with a single and steadfast commitment to achieving conservation results for native birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With a focus on efficiency and working in partnership, we take on the toughest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on sound science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation.

Conservation Speaker Series  (Saving the Birds of the Bay Area) at Oakland Zoo

Thursday, January 14th from 6:30pm - 9:00pm

The Bay Area is a site of hemispheric significance for an astonishing array of migratory birds, as well as year-round resident. How can we protect so many species, with such varying sets of needs, in the midst of an ever-growing urban metropolis of 8.5 million people? Learn how one of the nation's leading Audubon chapters has been working on behalf of our local birds - and connecting people to conservation efforts around our Bay - for 99 years! Cost is $12-$20 sliding scale. All proceeds benefit the Golden Gate Audubon Society. No registration necessary and tickets available at the event. For more information about the event visit www.oaklandzoo.org or contact Amy Gotliffe, Conservation Director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (510) 632-9525 ext.122. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, Oakland, CA 94605

Zoovie Night at Oakland Zoo

Friday January 15, 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Put on your jammies and enjoy an evening of Zoovie magic with the whole family. Bring your pillows, blankets, and chairs and snuggle up in our auditorium for a specially selected animal-or nature-themed movie (Finding Nemo). Meet some of our nocturnal Education animals brought to you by Roosevelt, Oakland Zoo's costumed alligator mascot. Hot chocolate (with marshmallows, of course) and popcorn will be provided, but you are welcome to bring your own treats and traditional family movie fare. Let the show begin! Cost is $7 per adult and $7 per child to cover the costs of the Animal close-up program and snacks. Note that the movies are a complimentary addition to the evening’s activities. Please note that memberships do not apply toward program fees. Pre-registration is required, contact Paula Booth at (510) 632-9525, ext. 220 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, Oakland, CA 94605

ZooKids: Kids and Crafts - Carnivores, Herbivores & Me

Saturday, January 16 & 23 9:30am – 12:00pm

Does your little one love animals? ZooKids classes are a great way for children age 4-5 to have a fun and educational adventure at the zoo.

Each program includes a mini zoo tour, craft, games, animal close-up, and snack. What do you like for dinner? Did you know some animals eat only meat; some only plants, and some eat everything? Learn how carnivores, herbivores, and omnivores are specially adapted for their unique diets. Cost is $23.00 for current Oakland Zoo members or $26.00 for non-members. Pre-registration is required, Contact Paula Booth at (510) 632-9525, ext. 220 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links road, Oakland, CA 94605.

Volunteer Orientation at Oakland Zoo

Saturday January 30, 10:00am

Interested in meeting new people, working with animals, and having fun? Volunteering is a great way to give back to the community, learn a new skill, share your knowledge with others, and make a difference. Oakland Zoo is always looking for volunteers to help us in a variety of departments. Join the over 500 volunteers that donate their time and talents as part of the Oakland Zoo family. Come to our New Volunteer Information meeting and sign up to be a part of our volunteer family. Pre-registration is required. There is no fee associated with this meeting. For more information go to our website www.oaklandzoo.org  or contact Lisa O’Dwyer, Volunteers Programs manager at (510)632-9525 ext. 141. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, Oakland, CA 94605.

Teddy Bear Tea with Friends at Oakland Zoo

Saturday February 6, 9:30am – 12:00pm

It’s tea-time at Oakland Zoo and you are cordially invited! Children bring an adult, a stuffie, and learn all about one of our Zoo’s special animals. Enjoy a morning of snacks, activities, books and play while making and delivering an enrichment gift straight to the zoo animal you’ve been learning about. When the fun is done, children will receive a surprise-filled treat bag to take home.  Program Fee: $26.00 per child and $12.00 per adults. Pre-registration is required, Contact Paula Booth at (510) 632-9525, ext. 220 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links road, Oakland, CA 94605.

Oakland Zoo’s Conservation Speaker Series Presents Action for Sharks

Wednesday February 10, 6:30pm – 9:00pm

Presented by marine biologist and ocean advocate David McGuire, Founder and Director of Shark Stewards. As Californians, we have a special responsibility for ocean conservation. Shark Stewards protects sharks and critical marine habitat for the health of our oceans through science, education and advocacy. Come learn about the challenges sharks face in the wild, and what you can do to help.. Cost is $12.00- $20.00 sliding scale. All proceeds benefit Shark Stewards. No registration necessary and tickets available at the event. For more information about the event visit www.oaklandzoo.org or contact Amy Gotliffe, Conservation Director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or  (510) 632-9525 ext.122. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links road, Oakland, CA 94605.

Parent’s Night Off at Oakland Zoo

Saturday, February 13, 5:30pm- 10:30pm

Parent’s Night Off is designed with adults in mind – we offer a safe, fun-filled environment where you can drop off your children knowing they will have a blast playing and learning about wildlife. We will feed them and take them on a guided walk in the zoo to visit with the animals. Afterwards, we will head back to our auditorium to meet an animal up-close and play some games. If it’s an evening program, we end the night with a movie on the big screen. We guarantee you will pick your child/ children up happier, smarter, and exhausted! It’s a win-win all ‘round! Cost is $45.00 per child and $30.00 for each additional sibling. Pre-registration is required, contact Paula Booth at (510) 632-9525, ext. 220 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links road, Oakland, CA 94605.

Zoovie Night at Oakland Zoo

Saturday February 20, 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Put on your jammies and enjoy an evening of Zoovie magic with the whole family. Bring your pillows, blankets, and chairs and snuggle up in our auditorium for a specially selected animal-or nature-themed movie (Disney Nature: Monkey Kingdom). Meet some of our nocturnal Education animals brought to you by Roosevelt, Oakland Zoo's costumed alligator mascot. Hot chocolate (with marshmallows, of course) and popcorn will be provided, but you are welcome to bring your own treats and traditional family movie fare. Let the show begin! Cost is $7 per adult and $7 per child to cover the costs of the Animal close-up program and snacks. Note that the movies are a complimentary addition to the evening’s activities. Please note that memberships do not apply toward program fees. Pre-registration is required, contact Paula Booth at (510) 632-9525, ext. 220 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, Oakland, CA 94605

ZooKids: Kids and Crafts – Let’s Leap!

Saturdays, February 20 & 27 9:30am – 12:00pm

Does your little one love animals? ZooKids classes are a great way for children age 4-5 to have a fun and educational adventure at the zoo.

Each program includes a mini zoo tour, craft, games, animal close-up, and snack. It's Leap Year! A lemur can leap 25 feet. Frogs can leap 20-50 times their body length. Squirrel monkeys leap from tree branch to tree branch. Can you leap? How far? Come learn about special adaptations of leaping animals in celebration of Leap Year! Cost is $23.00 for current Oakland Zoo members or $26.00 for non-members. Pre-registration is required, Contact Paula Booth at (510) 632-9525, ext. 220 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links road, Oakland, CA 94605.

Conservation Speaker Series (Project Coyote) at Oakland Zoo

Friday March 18, 6:30pm – 9:00pm

Wild Things - Coexisting with North America’s Native Carnivores.

Wolves, Bears, Bobcats, & Coyotes - oh my! Project Coyote Founder & Executive Director Camilla Fox will talk about why native carnivores matter, and how they keep ecosystems healthy. America’s war against predators is costly, brutal, and ineffective. Learn about national programs aimed at stopping the mistreatment and mismanagement of carnivores through education, science and advocacy.Cost is $12.00- $20.00 sliding scale. All proceeds benefit the Project Coyote. No registration necessary and tickets available at the event. For more information about the event visit www.oaklandzoo.org or contact Amy Gotliffe, Conservation Director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (510) 632-9525 ext.122. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, Oakland, CA 94605.

Teddy Bear Tea with Friends at Oakland Zoo

Sunday February 20, 9:30am – 12:00pm

It’s tea time at Oakland Zoo and you are cordially invited! Children bring an adult, a stuffie, and learn all about one of our Zoo’s special animals. Enjoy a morning of snacks, activities, books and play while making and delivering an enrichment gift straight to the zoo animal you’ve been learning about. When the fun is done, children will receive a surprise-filled treat bag to take home.  Program Fee: $26.00 per child and $12.00 per adults. Pre-registration is required, Contact Paula Booth at (510) 632-9525, ext. 220 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links road, Oakland, CA 94605.

Zoovie Night at Oakland Zoo

Friday March 25, 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Put on your jammies and enjoy an evening of Zoovie magic with the whole family. Bring your pillows, blankets, and chairs and snuggle up in our auditorium for a specially selected animal-or nature-themed movie (Alvin and the Chipmunks: Road Chip). Meet some of our nocturnal Education animals brought to you by Roosevelt, Oakland Zoo's costumed alligator mascot. Hot chocolate (with marshmallows, of course) and popcorn will be provided, but you are welcome to bring your own treats and traditional family movie fare. Let the show begin! Cost is $7 per adult and $7 per child to cover the costs of the Animal close-up program and snacks. Note that the movies are a complimentary addition to the evening’s activities. Please note that memberships do not apply toward program fees. Pre-registration is required, contact Paula Booth at (510) 632-9525, ext. 220 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links road, Oakland, CA 94605.

Spring Break ZooCamp at Oakland Zoo

March (Three-Day Workshops): 28-30 and April 4-6

March (Two-Day Workshops): 31 – April 1 and April 7-8

9:00am – 4:00pm

Unsure what to do with your children during their school's Spring Break? Send them to us! Spring Break ZooCamp runs Monday - Friday during the Spring Break weeks most common among East Bay school districts. This year we are offering a three-day workshop on Monday-Wednesday and a two-day workshop Thursday-Friday. Cost ranges from $150-$240 depending on program on Zoo Membership discount. Pre-registration is required. Contact Liz Low at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (510) 632-9525, ext.280 for registration details. www.oaklandzoo.org/zoocamp. Oakland Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, Oakland, CA 94605.

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area’s award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid’s activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information please visit our website at www.oaklandzoo.org

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Oakland, CA –  Oakland Zoo’s zookeepers collaborate with Buffalo Zoo, Queens Zoo, and Omaha Zoo on a highly-detailed fertility plan to produce, ship,  and release tadpoles into El Convento Natural Reserve, operated by Para la Naturaleza, located in the southern portion of Puerto Rico.

The specific breeding plan for the Puerto Rican crested toads is taking place within an eight-week window, which involves selecting prime breeding toads, creating specific temperature controlled environments, selecting eggs for fertilization, utilization of a rain chamber, antifungal treatments, and hormone injections. Since tadpoles morph into frogs about two weeks after hatching, the precise time of everything must be perfectly synchronized at all four zoos. Delicate fertility procedures were conducted by zookeepers and required careful coordinating and timing with specified dates. “We are so honored to be a part of this program,” stated Margaret Rousser, Zoological Manager at Oakland Zoo. “Being able to contribute to the conservation of a species is what zoos are all about.” If all goes as calculated, the four zoos will have had tadpoles hatch on the same day, timing a flight to Puerto Rico on week ten of the fertility calendar. The precious cargo will be packed up and shipped to arrive in Puerto Rico on October 22, 2015. On the same date of delivery, thousands of tadpoles will be released into their new habitat by partners in Puerto Rico.

The Puerto Rican crested toads were the first animals to be housed in Oakland Zoo’s Biodiversity Center, which opened in August of 2013. For the past two years, Oakland Zoo has been in close communication with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan, waiting for word that Oakland Zoo toads are recommended to breed. “We are delighted that the staff at Oakland Zoo has been able to successfully reproduce this critically endangered species,” said Diane Barber, Puerto Rican Crested Toad Species Survival Plan Coordinator. “Their efforts are directly contributing to the establishment of a new population of crested toads that will ensure their survival and eventual recovery in the wild.” The toads and tadpoles are housed in a quarantined lab at Oakland Zoo, being carefully monitored by zookeepers named on a special permit.

These toads are critically endangered in their homeland of Puerto Rico. According to the AZA, in the 1980’s, Puerto Rican Created toads (only native toad in Puerto Rico) were thought to be extinct. At this time, AZA collected and mobilized a group of toads, bringing them into captivity for breeding. The toad extinction in the 1920’s is believed to be caused by the introduction of the cane toad, which was introduced in the country to eradicate mites, which were ruining the sugar cane crop. This farming solution caused a domino effect; the new frogs soon out competed the native frogs for food, causing Puerto Rican Crested toads to be in dire straits. However, thanks to AZA breeding programs at zoos across the United States, more than 350,000 tadpoles have been released into their native Puerto Rican forests.

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO’S BIODIVERSITY CENTER:

Oakland Zoo’s Biodiversity Center opened in August of 2013. The Biodiversity Center is an important contribution to the global efforts to preserve our planet’s rich and diverse wildlife through conservation, research, education, and public participation. The Biodiversity Center directly supports critically endangered species both through captive breeding and by head starting. Animals bred in the Center will be introduced to wild habitats. Juveniles vulnerable in the wild are brought to the Center’s labs during their developmental period and returned to the wild once they are past their most vulnerable period. The Center’s research labs house and display current and ongoing research activities and programs focused on the study, management, protection, and restoration of threatened and endangered species, such as the Puerto Rican crested toad and Sierra Nevada mountain yellow-legged frog.  

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area's award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid's activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks.

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ASPCA Assists Lake County Animal Care & Control in Rescuing 
Displaced Animals from Devastating Wildfire in California

 
Professional responders conduct field rescues to save pets and livestock left behind,
assist local agency with sheltering effort

Lakeport, Calif.—Following a devastating wildfire in Lake County, the ASPCA® (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®), at the request of the Lake County Animal Care & Control and its animal disaster response team Lake Evacuation & Animal Protection (LEAP), deployed professional responders to conduct field rescues to save badly burned animals, as well as check individual residences for pets and livestock left behind. The ASPCA will also be assisting the local agency shelter displaced animals in its 30-foot disaster response trailer customized to house animals in an event of an emergency.

The unforgiving Valley fire swept through and burned 67,000 acres, destroying nearly 600 homes and leaving approximately 13,000 people displaced in the community. Pet owners were ordered to evacuate immediately by local officials as the fire spread quickly throughout the area, which resulted in many pets and livestock being left behind. Reports indicate that local authorities are now escorting residents to their homes in certain areas, allowing them to retrieve or feed the animals.
  
“The Lake Evacuation & Animal Protection team has been receiving numerous requests from concerned pet owners who asked us to check on their pets and make sure they have enough food and water,” said Bill Davidson, director of Lake County Animal Care & Control. “It’s hard to say how many pets are affected at this point, but we will continue to go out into the field to search for lost or injured pets and hopefully reunite them with their families.”

“We’re pleased to be working alongside the Lake Evacuation & Animal Protection team to help pet owners and displaced animals in the community, as well as support local agencies identify resource needs,” added Dick Green, senior director of Disaster Response for the ASPCA, who has been on the ground since Sunday. “The destruction caused by the fire is indescribable, and our hearts go out to everyone who has been affected by this disaster--people and pets alike.”
 
Animals rescued by the LEAP and the ASPCA are being examined and treated by veterinarians at the Lake County Animal Care & Control at 4949 Helbush Drive in Lakeport. Pet owners looking to report lost pets or rescue needs should contact the Lake County Animal Care & Control at (707) 263-0278.


About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

About Lake Evacuation & Animal Protection
LEAP is Lake County Animal Care & Control’s animal disaster response group. It is made up of the Animal Care & Control staff, as well as a group of highly trained volunteers.  All volunteers have completed the necessary applications, submitted copies of their driving records, completed the ICS training series 100, 200, and 700, as well as attend our annual training.  Most have even been through a two or three day animal disaster preparedness course offered by NVADG or a similar humane organization.

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