Displaying items by tag: adoptions

April is National Adopt- a-Greyhound Month

Thousands of Greyhounds In Need of Permanent Homes

Framingham, MA-A 40 mile per hour couch potato is just waiting to be adopted into a loving and permanent home. What better time than National Adopt-a-Greyhound month to welcome a beautiful, graceful and gentle greyhound into your family.

April is National Adopt-a-Greyhound month and the need to place surplus racing greyhounds has never been greater. The Greyhound Project is spreading the message of greyhound adoption awareness to ensure that 100 percent of these greyhounds find caring homes.

Although many greyhound tracks have closed in recent years, the need to find homes for retired racing greyhounds has not diminished.  Greyhounds retiring from the 22 remaining tracks located in seven states around the country still number in the thousands. These wonderful, elegant dogs are being cared for by adoption groups across the country as they wait to be adopted into their permanent homes.

“Greyhounds make great pets and companions,” said President of The Greyhound Project Melissa Cook. “They are graceful, gentle and can be a great addition to any dog-loving family. Many believe that regional race track closings have lessened the need to adopt these greyhounds into homes. That misperception results in a flood of retired racing greyhounds waiting to go to their permanent homes, particularly in regions with active tracks.”

“The need to move these dogs to non-racing states is critical and costs associated with accomplishing this present a real challenge. National Adopt-a-Greyhound month is a great time to welcome these wonderful Greyhounds into loving and permanent homes.”

The Greyhound Project works to support over 300 greyhound adoption groups nationwide. The charity also publishes Celebrating Greyhounds, an award-winning quarterly magazine written for greyhound adopters, owners, and supporters.

About The Greyhound Project

Founded in 1992, The Greyhound Project is a volunteer, non-profit organization. The mission of The Greyhound Project is to promote the welfare and adoption of greyhounds by providing support and information to adoption organizations, adopters, and the public. Please visit www.adopt-a-greyhound.org for more information.

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During ASPCA’s 2013 ‘Mega Match-a-thon’ Weekend

Three days of adoption events brought shelters together in effort to save more lives


NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced that animal welfare groups in 36 communities across the country found homes for 5,645 animals during the ASPCA’s 2013 ‘Mega Match-a-thon’ weekend from October 18-20. The ASPCA granted nearly $300,000 to support large-scale adoption events nationwide in an effort to give thousands of shelter animals a second chance at a new life.

“Adopting over 5,600 animals is a huge achievement for a single weekend,” said ASPCA President & CEO Matt Bershadker. “The success of these shelters illustrates the enormous impact we have on animals when we’re dedicated, innovative and inspired to connect with our communities. Every life saved is a victory.”

Here are some of the highlights from the weekend:

  • Shelters like KC Pet Project in Kansas City, Mo. and Greater Androscoggin Humane Society in Lewiston, Maine were left with countless empty kennels after their events, during which they found homes for 228 and 272 animals, respectively. And each of those empty kennels represents a new animal who can be rescued and adopted.
  • Volunteers young and old chipped in to support their local shelters, including two little girls who donated their lemonade stand proceeds to Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League in West Palm Beach, Fla., and a 98-year-old volunteer who helped No Kill Columbia in Mo. make bandanas for their adoptable animals.
  • New York’s Lollypop Farm, the Humane Society of Greater Rochester, didn’t just find homes for 128 cats and five dogs, but also for one rabbit, one guinea pig and a hamster, too.
  • A 13-week-old kitten made the journey from an overcrowded shelter in Ga. to Fort Collins Cat Rescue & Spay Neuter Clinic in Colorado, where a loving family adopted him during the group’s event.
  • Completely smashing its goal of 100 adoptions for the weekend, Nebraska Humane Society found homes for 226 cats and dogs in just one day.


For more information about the ASPCA’s Mega Match-a-thon events, please visit www.aspca.org.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

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NYPD will take lead in responding to animal cruelty complaints;
ASPCA increases forensics, direct care services for cruelty victims

Historic Collaboration Elevates Importance of Preventing Animal Cruelty

NEW YORK— The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) and the New York City Police Department (NYPD) announced today a broad strategic collaboration to provide enhanced protection to New York City’s animals by leveraging the strengths and expertise of both organizations. Under the agreement, the NYPD will take the lead role in responding to all animal cruelty complaints in the five boroughs, while the ASPCA will expand its direct care and forensics work to assist law enforcement officials by providing critical support for animal cruelty victims, including forensic evaluations, medical treatment, behavior assessments, housing and placement, as well as backup legal support and training.

The partnership will officially launch on September 1, beginning with a pilot in the Bronx. The program will expand citywide in early 2014. In the interim, animal cruelty complaints that originate in Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island will continue to be handled by agents from the ASPCA’s Humane Law Enforcement department.

With a small group of New York State peace officers, the ASPCA has voluntarily enforced New York State animal cruelty laws in the five boroughs since the organization was founded in 1866. However, the modern realities of New York City life call for a new approach—one that will provide broader protection for the City’s animals.

“Through this new collaboration, the ASPCA and NYPD together will provide even more effective protection and prevention of cruelty to New York City’s animals,” said Matthew Bershadker, President and Chief Executive Officer of the ASPCA. “The NYPD, which encompasses 77 precincts in the five boroughs, is equipped to do what the ASPCA simply cannot accomplish alone: incorporate the enforcement of animal cruelty laws into routine, everyday law enforcement work; elevate the importance of preventing crimes against animals; and provide necessary resources to combat those crimes. This historic partnership signals to the rest of the country the seriousness of animal cruelty, while potentially serving as a model for other large municipalities.”

Mr. Bershadker continued: “Going forward, we can maximize our ability to impact the most animals at risk by focusing our resources on what we do best, including assisting with undercover operations to expose animal fighting rings and other forms of cruelty, providing triage, ongoing medical care and humane shelter for animal victims, and offering comprehensive legal services to assist in all aspects of a criminal proceeding. The potential of this type of collaboration was clearly evident in last year’s Bronx dog fighting case, which resulted in the arrest of a suspect and the seizure of 50 fighting dogs. In this case, the NYPD led the nearly year-long investigation, while the ASPCA provided critical expert knowledge and services so that the investigation and prosecution of the case had the best chance to succeed.”

For cases outside of the criminal justice system, the ASPCA will continue to leverage its three-year-old Cruelty Intervention Advocacy (CIA) program that gets to the root causes of suffering, including intervention in cases involving hoarding and the provision of critical resources to pet owners who find themselves and their animals in unstable situations.

Services that the ASPCA will provide to the NYPD include:

  • Forensic services
  • Housing, veterinary care and behavioral evaluation/enrichment for animals seized by the NYPD
  • Adoption assistance
  • Legal backup support
  • Training
  • Field Assistance

“This partnership is an expansion of the long-standing alliance between the ASPCA and the NYPD and makes best use of the resources of both organizations to strengthen efforts to end cruelty to animals and ensure their welfare. We look forward to significant advances in this ongoing mission,” added Mr. Bershadker.

To report animal cruelty in New York City, the public is encouraged to call 311. For crimes in progress, individuals should call 911.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Million dollar effort helps 16,600 dogs and puppies find loving homes through relocation from overcrowded shelters

 

A dog at Miami-Dade Animal Services waits to be loaded onto a transport truck headed for Precious Pups Rescue in N.Y.
in the ASPCA's last transport for The Carroll Petrie Foundation Dog Rescue Project on Saturday.

 

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced that it has completed its work in The Carroll Petrie Foundation Dog Rescue Project, a $1 million initiative that has funded much-needed treatments and services for 16,600 shelter dogs and puppies at county and municipal animal sheltering organizations over the last year. The milestone was celebrated with a ‘Bon Voyage’ event as the final transport departed Miami-Dade Animal Services Saturday morning, with more than 30 dogs and puppies bound for Long Island’s Precious Pups Rescue in Calverton, N.Y.

The funding from The Carroll Petrie Foundation Dog Rescue Project prepared thousands of dogs for transport from overcrowded shelters to give them the best chance of finding permanent, loving homes. The project was made possible thanks to a generous donation from The Carroll Petrie Foundation.

Seeing the assistance we’ve been able to provide to shelters across the country thanks to The Carroll Petrie Foundation Dog Rescue Project has been truly inspiring,” said ASPCA President & CEO Matt Bershadker. “Through this generous donation, shelters were able to provide 16,600 dogs with the life-saving services they needed to get that second chance at finding loving homes.”

“Over the last year, we’ve expanded our relationships with shelters and rescue groups nationwide in this effort,” said Sandy Monterose, senior director of community initiatives for the ASPCA. “The project has reinforced our belief that collaboration among different groups toward a shared cause is what really makes a difference – we’re all working together, and it’s paying off in big ways for the animals.”

The following animal welfare organizations were participating partners in The Carroll Petrie Foundation Dog Rescue Project over the last year:

  • Lee County Humane Society in Auburn, Ala.
  • Animal Shelter of Pell City, Inc. in Pell City, Ala.
  • City of Huntsville Animal Services in Huntsville, Ala.
  • Prattville/Autauga Humane Society in Prattville, Ala.
  • Shelby Humane Society in Columbiana, Ala.
  • Maricopa County Animal Care & Control in Phoenix, Ariz.
  • City of Winslow Animal Control Care Facility in Winslow Ariz.
  • City of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Dept. of Animal Services County of Riverside in Jurupa Valley, Calif.
  • Los Angeles County Animal Care & Control in Long Beach, Calif.
  • Sacramento City, County, & SPCA in Sacramento, Calif.
  • Washington Humane Society in Washington, D.C.
  • Miami-Dade County Animal Services in Miami, Fla.
  • Tallahassee-Leon Community Animal Service Center in Tallahassee, Fla.
  • City of Jacksonville Animal Care in Jacksonville, Fla.
  • City of Chicago Commission on Animal Care & Control in Chicago, Ill.
  • South Suburban Humane Society in Chicago Heights, Ill.
  • Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control in Ft. Wayne, Ind.
  • Kentucky River Regional Animal Shelter in Hazard, Ky.
  • Knox-Whitley Animal Shelter in Rockholds, Ky.
  • Companion Animal Alliance of Baton Rouge in Baton Rouge, La.
  • Plaquemines Parish Government in Belle Chasse, La.
  • St. Bernard Parish Animal Services in Violet, La.
  • Livingston County Humane Society in Chillicothe, Md.
  • Pound Buddies in Muskegon, Mich.
  • Leech Lake Tribal Police in Cass Lake, Minn.
  • Central Missouri Humane Society in Columbia Mo.
  • Kansas City Pet Project in Kansas City, Mo.
  • Humane Society of South Mississippi in Gulfport, Miss.
  • Oxford-Layfayette Humane Society in Oxford, Miss.
  • Tupelo Lee Humane Society in Tupelo, Miss.
  • Foothills Shelter in Columbus, N.C.
  • Onslow County Animal Services in Jacksonville, N.C.
  • Asheville Humane Society in Asheville, N.C.
  • The Animal Foundation in Las Vegas, Nev.
  • Animal Services of the Mesilla Valley in Las Cruces, N.M.
  • Valencia County Animal Control in Los Lunas, N.M.
  • Oklahoma Humane Society in Oklahoma, Okla.
  • Jackson County Animal Care & Control in Phoenix, Ore.
  • Beaufort County Animal Shelter in Beaufort, S.C.
  • Greenville County Animal Shelter in Greenville, SC
  • Spartanburg Humane Society in Spartanburg, SC
  • Anderson County PAWS in Anderson, S.C.
  • Charleston Animal Society in North Charleston, S.C.
  • Blount County Animal Shelter / Smokey Mountain Animal Foundation in Maryville,Tenn.
  • Happy Paws Foundation / Checotah Animal Shelter in Nashville, Tenn.
  • McKamey Animal Center in Chattanooga, Tenn.
  • City of Abilene in Abilene, Texas
  • Dallas Animal Services in Dallas, Texas
  • El Paso Animal Services in El Paso, Texas
  • SCRAPS in Spokane Valley, Wash.


Since The Carroll Petrie Foundation Dog Rescue Project began in July 2012, the ASPCA has helped save 16,600 dogs to-date through a per dog or puppy subsidy for each animal helped. The per dog or puppy subsidy was used to provide needed services such as crates and gasoline purchases for transport vehicles and “make-ready” veterinary services for the dogs (i.e. spay/neuter, health certificates, vaccines) that prepared them to leave the shelter. Participating organizations could also choose to give all or part of the money to the rescue groups or destination shelters that received the dogs, helping to offset their costs. The subsidy only applied to lives saved above and beyond each participating group’s previous year's numbers.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

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For homeless cats and dogs in animal shelters across the country, the first weekend in June is somewhat like the Super Bowl weekend of second chances. June is generally the month that pet shelters launch initiatives to empty shelters to make way for a summer of new-found kittens and puppies and adult strays.

 

One such initiative has a lofty goal of finding 5,000 cats and dogs homes in an orchestrated event covering eight communities in five states and involving more than 150 pet shelters and rescues over Saturday, June 1, and Sunday, June 2. As part of its strategy to promote free adoption nationwide, Maddie’s Fund ® plans to host America’s biggest free adoption event, dedicating $4 million to the effort. Shelter locations participating can be found at http://adopt.maddiesfund.org/.

 

It’s not just the waiving of adoption fees that will inspire families to take a trip to the shelter that weekend, although with normal adoption fees ranging from $80 to $250 per pet, it doesn’t hurt, says President of Maddie’s Fund Rich Avanzino. But it’s more about the air of excitement that surround these events in each community.

 

“Human nature is to procrastinate and the free adoption weekends, with all their high-energy and media attention, encourage people to do what they’ve been planning on doing for a long time—adopt a pet,” says Avanzino, “We’re finding free adoption events are becoming a trend with shelters because they are a proven way to empty facilities and lighten the financial burden of caring long-term for animals, while at the same time finding loving homes for animals and reducing the need for euthanasia.”

Adopters must still qualify for their pets, and just because the pets are free, shelters aren’t out the expense for caring and housing the pet. Maddie’s Fund gives organizations from $500 to $2,000 per adoption. The more senior the animal with medical conditions, the bigger the gift.

“Maddie’s Fund wants to give all healthy, senior, and treatable shelter dogs and cats loving homes and free pet adoption events have proven very successful toward that end,” Avanzino adds.

The trend of holding free adoption events at animal shelters can only grow, Avanzino believes. “We’ll see more pet-loving benefactors in communities nationwide get on board with assisting their local shelters to apply the fee-waived strategy to save pet lives and alleviate the over-crowding in shelters,” he says.

 

More information on participating shelters can be found at: http://adopt.maddiesfund.org/.

Maddie’s Fund (www.maddiesfund.org) is a family foundation endowed by the founder of Workday® and PeopleSoft, Dave Duffield and his wife, Cheryl. Maddie’s Fund is helping to achieve and sustain a no-kill nation by providing solutions to the most challenging issues facing the animal welfare community through Maddie’s Grant Giving and Maddie’s InstituteSM . Maddie’s Fund is named after the family’s beloved Miniature Schnauzer who passed away in 1997.

1 female boxer mix (4 years old) and 1 male Labrador mix (5 years old) that we rescued from a local shelter. We’ve had both dogs since they were months old and they are both house trained as they have been kept inside throughout their lives. They get along great with other dogs and are not food or toy aggressive. We have a small child that has lived with the dogs with no issues since he was born; he is now 2 ½ years old. They are very playful and are trained for walks. We would like for them to be re-homed together.

We are moving in to an apartment and are not allowed to have big dogs there.

If you are interested please reach out to Marcela at 813-484-3401 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can also connect Mike at 813-842-7077 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) assisted multiple local animal welfare groups in Florida to find homes for nearly 300 cats during three major adoption events on August 11 and 12. Events hosted by the Jacksonville Humane Society, Cat Depot and Humane Society of Pinellas (with assistance from Bay Area DART) drew more than 1,600 people to cities across the Sunshine state to adopt hundreds of cats rescued in late February from Caboodle Ranch, a not-for-profit corporation located in Lee, Fla.

"The ASPCA is extremely grateful to these rescue groups who worked tirelessly to find loving homes for the cats and made the adoption events a success," said Tim Rickey, senior director of ASPCA Field Investigations and Response. "Thanks to the dedication of these wonderful groups and support from the communities, these cats are sleeping in new beds—in places they truly can call home—for the first time in their lives."

All available cats, many of which have special needs, were spayed/neutered, micro-chipped, vaccinated, and provided an ID tag free of charge to qualified adopters.

Since February 27, hundreds of ASPCA responders have been managing the sheltering, medical treatment and behavior enrichment of cats rescued from unsanitary conditions at Caboodle Ranch. Many of the cats exhibited signs of neglect, and responders have provided much-needed care to bring the cats back to health. Following the civil hearing, the cats were transferred to the three agencies that hosted the adoption events to provide a second chance for these rescued animals.

“We are thrilled with the overall support from animal lovers who came out to adopt, and now we look forward to helping our partner agencies find homes for the remaining cats that are available for adoption,” added Rickey. “Our goal has always been to do what’s in the best interest of the cats, and we remain committed to helping find placement options for the rest of the animals.”

The Halifax Humane Society, as part of its “Plan Alive” partnership with Flagler Humane Society and Southeast Volusia Humane Society to reduce animal overpopulation, will be hosting an adoption event to find homes for some of the remaining cats on Saturday, August 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Some of these cats have special needs, including those that are FIV-positive or have feline leukemia. The event will take place at Volusia County Fairgrounds (Hester Building), 3150 E. New York Avenue (State Road 44), DeLand, Fla. Potential adopters should bring with them one government-issued photo ID (i.e. driver’s license, passport, military ID, or non-driver ID) and proof of address. For more information, please visit www.halifaxhumanesociety.org.

“We also want to thank Jacksonville Animal Care and Protective Services for allowing the ASPCA to use its old facility to care for the cats for nearly six months,” added Rickey. The ASPCA’s rescue efforts have exceeded more than $1.7 million, which includes: more than 150,000 cans of food; 140,000 pounds of cat litter; 5,000 doses of antibiotics; and 85,000 man-hours to ensure these cats receive the care they deserve. Thirty-four animal welfare agencies sent staff and volunteers from around the country/state throughout the operation to support the ASPCA’s rescue and sheltering efforts.

Stay tuned to www.aspca.org/blog and @ASPCA on Twitter for stories and photos of “happy tails” in the coming days.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

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(ANNAPOLIS, Maryland) June 18, 2012—During Adopt a Cat Month, the CATalyst Council, a national initiative comprised of animal health and welfare organizations working on behalf of cats, encourages potential adopters to consider adopting an older cat.

 

While kittens may be fun and have seemingly boundless energy, you may find that having a more mellow older cat is a better fit for your family and your lifestyle. Older cats also tend to stay in shelters longer than younger ones, which means that shelter staff have gotten to know them better and can recommend one that would be perfect for you.

 

“Adult cats are just big kittens with developed personalities,” says Jan McHugh Smith, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region. “They come in all shapes, sizes and colors; you can adopt a cool cat, a lap cat, a fat cat. Just adopt.”

 

“Many people overlook older cats in shelters because they worry about the amount of time the cat has left, but many cats live to be well into their late teens, so adopting a 6-year-old cat could mean that you still have over a decade to enjoy each other’s company,” says Dr. Jane Brunt, CATalyst Council’s executive director. “The most important thing to remember when adopting any cat is that proper veterinary care is necessary to help your new friend enjoy a long, happy, healthy life.”

 

A cat as young as 3 years old has a harder time finding a new home than a kitten does, and generally around 60 percent of cats taken in at shelters are adults.

 

“Adult cats can become a member of your family just as easily as a kitten, generally know how to use a litter box and are typically mellower than their younger counterparts,” says Bob Rohde, president and CEO of the Dumb Friends League in Denver. “Older cats have just as much love to give and seem to be more grateful for getting that second chance at happiness.”

 

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The CATalyst Council is a national organization which includes a wide variety of animal health and welfare organizations as well as corporate members of the animal health industry that are working together to improve the health and welfare of America’s favorite pet. It was founded in response to troubling statistics released by the American Veterinary Medical Association that indicate an increase in our nation’s pet cat population coupled with a decline in veterinary care for those cats. More information about the CATalyst Council is available at www.catalystcouncil.org.

 

The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee Hosts

Remembering Bella Day – June 2, 2012

A Special Event to Honor the Inspirational Relationship between

A Dog Named Bella and Her Elephant Tarra

HOHENWALD, TENN. (May 23, 2012) – The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee’s Welcome Center in Hohenwald, TN is hosting a day of special activities to honor the memory of Bella, the little stray dog who befriended the Sanctuary’s founding elephant Tarra and captured the hearts of animal lovers around the world. Remembering Bella Day will be held on Saturday, June 2 from 11:00AM – 4:00 PM at the Welcome Center on 27 E. Main St. in Hohenwald, located approximately four miles from the elephant habitat. In honor of Bella and the unique relationship she shared with Tarra, The Elephant Sanctuary is also encouraging the public to adopt a homeless stray from their local humane shelter in Bella’s memory during the month of June.

For eight years, Bella and Tarra were inseparable, swimming in ponds, wandering trails, exploring meadows, and resting side by side in the sunshine on their 2700 acre Sanctuary.

Steve Hartman introduced the unlikely duo to the world in a 2009 segment for CBS Evening News, and Tarra and Bella’s story quickly went viral on the internet, inspiring people around the world. Of the two, Hartman said,They harbor no fears, no secrets, no prejudices. Just two living creatures who somehow managed to look past their immense differences.

When Bella sustained an injury in 2007, Tarra held vigil for weeks outside of the Asian Barn at The Elephant Sanctuary, waiting for her companion to recover. In October of 2011, Bella passed away, apparently a victim of a coyote attack, and Tarra’s devotion to Bella was shown in a final act of friendship: Tarra picked up Bella’s body and cradling her in her trunk, carried her home.

At Bella’s passing, The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee established The Bella Fund—a memorial fund to honor Bella’s life at The Elephant Sanctuary and her friendship with Tarra. Donations to The Bella Fund support both the ongoing care of the resident elephants as well as the care of strays, like Bella, who wander into Hohenwald seeking sanctuary and friendship. A portion of the proceeds from The Bella Fund are used to support local humane associations and their efforts to care for strays in need of a permanent home.

Remembering Bella Day activities will include a presentation from their Caregivers about Bella and Tarra’s inspirational friendship, a photo display of their history at The Sanctuary, a Pet Adoption Day where visitors can adopt a Hohenwald stray in honor of Bella, and a presentation of contributions from The Bella Fund to support High Forest Humane Society.

Sanctuary Board Member, dog rescuer and author Sharon Langford will also be on hand for a book signing and all proceeds will benefit The Bella Fund. In her book, “Living with the Rescues,” she shares inspirations and life lessons she learned from her rescued dogs.

For a complete schedule of the day’s events and more information about Remembering Bella Day, The Bella Fund, and The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, please visit www.elephants.com

Calendar of Events: Remembering Bella Day

When: June 2, 2012 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Where: The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee’s Welcome Center

27 E. Main St. Hohenwald, TN 38462

Schedule of Events: Pet Adoption Day 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

A Book Signing of “Living with the Rescues” by author Sharon Langford 12:30-2:30 PM

Presentation on Tarra and Bella’s friendship by their Caregivers 2:30 PM

Contribution from The Bella Fund presented to High Forest Humane Society 3:30 PM

About The Elephant Sanctuary

The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee is the nation's largest habitat for needy elephants and provides a spacious and natural environment in which elephants, retired from circuses and zoos, can spend their remaining years in peace. Established in 1995, the 2,700 acre non-profit Sanctuary is located 2 hours south of Nashville in rural Tennessee and to date has provided a safe haven for 24 elephants in need. After a life on exhibit and entertaining the public, to ensure minimal intrusion on the sanctity of their Sanctuary, the elephants’ habitat is not open to the public.

The Elephant Sanctuary is, however, dedicated to education, and has installed a unique system of solar powered, wireless cameras ("Elecams") throughout the three habitats, providing non-invasive opportunities for observation and education through the website www.elephants.com, through Distance Learning Programs to schools and community groups around the country, and also with Caregiver Presentations at The Welcome Center located several miles from the elephant habitat.

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Lionsgate, Phoenix Pictures and Alcon Entertainment present a PG-13, 110 minute, comedy, drama, romance, directed by Kirk Jones, written by Shauna Cross and Heather Hach, book by Heidi Murkoff with a theatre release of May 18, 2012.

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