Displaying items by tag: Wildlife

26% of all mammals are at risk of extinction

41% of all amphibians are at risk

30% of sharks and manta rays are at risk

13% of all birds species are at risk

 

WILD VET ADVENTURES:

SAVING ANIMALS AROUND THE WORLD 

WITH DR. GABBY WILD

 

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The recent UN World Wildlife Day (celebrated on March 3rd) remind us of the urgent need to protect wildlife and raise awareness of challenges facing the world’s wild fauna and flora. Inspire your little nature lover with National Geographic Kids’ WILD VET ADVENTURES: SAVING ANIMALS AROUND THE WORLD WITH DR. GABBY WILD where you will travel the planet to meet some of Earth’s most incredible critters through the eyes of adventurous wildlife veterinarian, Dr. Gabby Wild.

Whether it’s pioneering elephant acupuncture, or treating Jane Goodall’s chimps, Dr. Wild’s vibrant conservation mission has taken her around the globe to work with zoos, museums, top conservation organizations, and universities. Her non-profit foundation is dedicated to the protection of the world’s most endangered creatures.

Join Dr. Gabby Wild on Tuesday, March 9th as she discusses:

·       Her most unusual patients and scariest vet experience

·       Interesting veterinarian care from jaguar dentistry to darting wild monkeys for care

·       Her non-profit foundation dedicated to the protection of the world’s most endangered creatures

·       Exotic animal behavior from their quirky natural traits to curious facts galore

·       How the book covers over 80 animals from regal lions to playful pandas, fearsome Gilamonsters to creepy tarantulas, and more.

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Dr. Gabby Wild has traveled the world to save animals. From pioneering elephant acupuncture to treating Jane Goodall’s chimpanzees in Uganda. Kids often recognize Dr. Wild as the veterinarian from Animal Jam Classic (over 130 million registered users) where she has answered questions from children about wild animals. Some of her noted recent collaborations: World Wildlife Fund, National Geographic Society, Jane Goodall Institute, Harvard University, Oxford University, The American Museum of Natural History, The Bronx Zoo, Zoological Society of London, Natural History Museum ( London) , and Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle (Paris). American-born and raised shortly there after in France and later in Boca Raton, FL, when Dr. Wild is not traveling to save animals, she is an emergency room doctor and veterinary surgeon at The Animal Surgical Center on Long Island. She received her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from Cornell University, Master’s of Public Heath from the University of Minnesota, and is also a published genetics researche

Lawsuit Filed to Restore Bird Protections

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Kentucky Warblers are among the hundreds of bird species that benefit from a strong Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Photo by Frode Jacobsen

(Washington, D.C., January 19, 2021) A coalition of national environmental groups filed litigation (Case Number: 1:21-cv-00448) today challenging the current Administration's move to eliminate longstanding protections for waterfowl, raptors, and songbirds under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). The litigants include American Bird Conservancy, Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, and the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The move challenges a new rule by the outgoing Administration that greatly weakens essential protections provided by the MBTA. This rule comes at a time when scientists have raised alarm over the loss of 3 billion North American birds during the past 50 years. It would end enforcement against “incidental take” of birds ― the predictable and preventable killing of birds by industrial practices. The Administration seeks to codify this in spite of the fact that last August, a federal judge struck down this opinion.

“We urge President-elect Biden to quickly eliminate this threat to migratory birds and act to establish a permitting system to reduce preventable mortality,” said Steve Holmer, Vice President of Government Relations for American Bird Conservancy (ABC). “Congress can support this effort by passing the Migratory Bird Protection Act.

“Last fall, a federal court overturned the Administration’s reinterpretation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act that ended decades of enforcement and let industry off the hook for killing birds,” said Holmer. “Today’s lawsuit challenges a federal rule based on the same bad reasoning.”

The outgoing Administration continues to argue that the law applies only to the intentional killing of birds and not “incidental” killing from industrial activities activities that kill millions of birds every year, such as oil spills and electrocutions on power lines. This reinterpretation was first put in place in December 2017 through a legal opinion from the Interior Department.

Citing To Kill a Mockingbird, U.S. District Court Judge Valerie Caproni wrote that “if the Department of the Interior has its way, many Mockingbirds and other migratory birds that delight people and support ecosystems throughout the country will be killed without legal consequence.” In rejecting the Administration’s opinion, the court noted that the MBTA makes it unlawful to kill birds “by any means whatever or in any manner” — thus the Administration's interpretation violates the plain language of the statute.

“Implementation of this rule will result in the needless killing of birds at a time when many bird species desperately need our help,” said ABC President Mike Parr. “It’s always our preference to solve problems without lawsuits, but the egregious nature of this rule requires nothing less.”

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American Bird Conservancy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving wild birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation. Find us on abcbirds.orgFacebookInstagram, and Twitter (@ABCbirds).

Press Release

Groups challenge Trump administration over gray wolf delisting

Response to outgoing administration removing Endangered Species Act protections from the gray wolf  
 
 

Today six environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration’s rule that removed Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states except for a small population of Mexican gray wolves in Arizona and New Mexico. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made its decision despite the science that concludes wolves are still functionally extinct in the vast majority of their former range across the continental U.S.

Earthjustice filed the lawsuit on behalf of Defenders of Wildlife, Center for Biological Diversity, Sierra Club, National Parks Conservation Association, Oregon Wild and the Humane Society of the United States

“This is no ‘Mission Accomplished’ moment for wolf recovery,” said Kristen Boyles, Earthjustice attorney. “Wolves are only starting to get a toehold in places like Northern California and the Pacific Northwest, and wolves need federal protection to explore habitat in the Southern Rockies and the Northeast. This delisting decision is what happens when bad science drives bad policy.”

Nicholas Arrivo, managing attorney for the Humane Society of the United States, said, "The delisting we've challenged today represents the latest chapter in the sad saga of the Fish and Wildlife Service's failure to do its duty to protect and ensure the recovery of wolves under the Endangered Species Act. We're confident that the court will strike down this illegal decision and restore the federal protections needed to give America's wolves a genuine opportunity to recover."

“Stripping protections for gray wolves in the Lower 48—before they have fully recovered and in the middle of a wildlife extinction crisis—was based on politics, not science,” said Bonnie Rice, endangered species campaign representative at the Sierra Club. “Gray wolves are still missing from vast areas of the country. Without Endangered Species protections, wolves just starting to return to places like California and the Pacific Northwest will be extremely vulnerable. Wolves are critical to maintaining the balance of natural systems and we are committed to fighting for their full recovery.” 

“We hope this lawsuit finally sets the wolf on a path to true recovery,” said Collette Adkins, carnivore conservation director at the Center for Biological Diversity. “Restoring federal protections would allow further recovery in places like California, which is home now to just a single pack of wolves. Without federal protections, the future of gray wolves rests in the hands of state governments, many of which, like Utah and South Dakota, are hostile to wolf recovery.”

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s decision to remove Endangered Species Act protection from gray wolves in the lower-48 states threatens populations just beginning to make a comeback in national parks,” said Bart Melton, wildlife program director for the National Parks Conservation Association. “After decades of absence, gray wolves are starting to re-inhabit park landscapes in Oregon, Washington, California, and Colorado. However, these populations are far from recovered. Rather than working alongside communities to support the return of wolves, the administration unlawfully said, ‘good enough’ and removed ESA protections. We are hopeful the court will reinstate these protections.”  

“It is far too premature to declare wolves recovered and to strip protections from them in the Western two-thirds of Oregon,” said Danielle Moser, wildlife program coordinator for Oregon Wild. “Removing wolves from the endangered species list would turn their management entirely over to Oregon’s embattled Department of Fish and Wildlife, which continues to push for hunting and trapping of the state’s already fragile wolf population.” 

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared a premature victory with its reckless decision to strip gray wolves of federal ESA protections,” said Jamie Rappaport Clark, president and CEO with Defenders of Wildlife. “This decision, if it stands, will short circuit gray wolf recovery, limit the range available to wolf packs, and subject wolves to fragmented state laws, some with hostile anti-wolf policies. Defenders is challenging this decision in court and pushing the agency to reinstate needed legal protections.”

Background

Gray wolf recovery in the United States should be an American conservation success story. Once found nationwide, gray wolves were hunted, trapped, and poisoned for decades; by 1967 there were fewer than 1,000 wolves in one isolated part of the upper Midwest. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protected gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act in 1978. Today there are recovering wolf populations in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Montana and Idaho; wolves have begun to inhabit Washington, Oregon, and California; and unclaimed wolf habitat remains in states like Maine, Colorado and Utah.

Last year, 1.8 million Americans submitted comments opposing delisting. Additionally, 86 members of Congress (in both the House and Senate), 100 scientists, 230 businesses, Dr. Jane Goodall from the Jane Goodall Institute, and 367 veterinary professionals all submitted letters opposing the wolf delisting plan. Even the scientific peer reviews commissioned by the Fish and Wildlife Service itself found that the agency’s proposal ignored science and appeared to come to a predetermined conclusion, with inadequate scientific support.

PETA CALLS ON GOVERNMENT TO ACKNOWLEDGE ANIMAL SENTIENCE AND END EXPERIMENTS

 

NIH must review the ethics of using animals given their own research findings that animals think and feel

 

DR. INGRID TAYLOR, veterinarian and research associate for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

BACKGROUND:

A wealth of scientific evidence supports the fact that animals are aware of the world around them and experience a full array of emotions, including fear, love, joy, curiosity, loneliness and pleasure. More than 2,500 studies have shown what many people already knew: that dogs, rats, cows, sheep, pigs and others experience emotions, ranging from joy and happiness to sadness, grief and post-traumatic stress disorder. They even experience jealousy, resentment and empathy.

Specific examples of animals and feelings include:

  • Rats: demonstrate remorse for bad decisions; will forgo treats to help another rat in need; giggle when tickled.
  • Mice: woo their mates with high-pitched love songs.
  • Sheep: recognize pictures of familiar faces; show anger, boredom, disgust and happiness.
  • Chickens: become upset when their chicks are stressed and try to soothe them.
  • Cuttlefish: experience REM sleep and may dream like humans.
  • Hermit crabs: aware of pain.
  • Octopuses: have planned daring escapes from aquariums, making their moves when they know they aren’t being closely watched.
  • Pigs: engage in complex play, devising games with toys and other animals.

Despite all the evidence—from scientific studies funded by NIH—that animals are sentient, and despite a wealth of modern-day alternatives, the agency continues to fund deadly experiments on them. In response to this practice, PETA is calling on the government to acknowledge that animals are living feeling beings and end of animal experiments. PETA is asking the NIH to begin by immediately reviewing the ethics of using sentient animals in biomedical, behavioral and psychological experiments.

For more information, please visit www.PETA.org


More About Dr. Taylor: Dr. Ingrid Taylor is a research associate for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. As a veterinarian, she researches biomedical experiments that use animals and provides expert opinions on pain management, experiment protocols and other welfare issues. She liaises with government regulatory agencies, universities and corporations to end their use of animals in experimentation. She has met with pharmaceutical companies in Europe to discuss their animal welfare programs and consulted on numerous cruelty cases for PETA Before joining PETA, she spent several years in clinical veterinary practice and served in the U.S. Air Force.

 

Bas Huijbregts

African Species Director, Wildlife Conservation Program

Bas Huijbregts
Media inquiries: News And Press Page
 

Bas leads WWF’s work on wildlife conservation in Africa, focusing primarily on elephants, great apes, and rhinos. The most exciting part of protecting these charismatic, flagship species is that by protecting those, the protected areas and wider ecosystems on which they depend are also protected. His work entails landscape planning, protected area management, law enforcement, community-based natural resource management, and the monitoring of species populations over time and space. Given the current poaching crisis on the continent, a particular focus is given to reinforcing protection efforts in WWF’s priority landscapes and fighting wildlife crime.

Bas first started working in Africa in 1996 doing large mammal and socio-economic baseline surveys. These surveys laid the foundation for the creation of the 3,700 sq. mile Minkebe National Park, one of the last strongholds for the African forest elephant.

From there, Bas led the Gamba program along the coast of Gabon, home to the world’s most important nesting site for leatherback turtles, surfing hippos and elephants on the beach, followed by positions as conservation director for Gabon and for the Central Africa region. Before joining his wife in the US in 2014, he led the joint WWF/TRAFFIC Central Africa wildlife crime initiative based out of Yaounde, Cameroon.

With the last male ailing, the northern white rhino is almost gone

In this July 28, 2017, photo, wildlife ranger Zachariah Mutai takes care of Sudan, the world's last male northern white rhino, at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia county in Kenya.
(Joe Mwihia / Associated Press)

The beleaguered northern white rhinoceros moved closer to extinction this week after conservationists announced that the health of the only surviving male of the species was deteriorating.

The rhino, named Sudan, made headlines last year after it was dubbed “The Most Eligible Bachelor in the World” on the dating app Tinder as part of a campaign to spread awareness about rhinos and raise money to help protect them.

But now Sudan’s days appear to be numbered.

He was “starting to show signs of ailing,” according to a statement posted Wednesday on Twitter by the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, the preserve in Kenya where the 45-year-old rhino has lived since 2009. “His health has begun deteriorating, and his future is not looking bright.”

“We are very concerned about him — he’s extremely old for a rhino and we do not want him to suffer unnecessarily,” it said. White rhinos live until around 40 on average, though those being cared for in captivity can survive longer.

Sudan developed “an uncomfortable age-related infection on his back right leg” at the end of 2017, the conservancy said. A team of veterinarians from around the world assessed the animal, which responded well to treatment and began to heal, soon resuming normal movement and foraging habits.

But recently, a secondary and much deeper infection was discovered beneath the initial one and Sudan was taking longer to recover, “despite the best efforts of his team of vets who are giving him 24-hour care,” the organization said.

There are two other white rhinos left in the world — a female named Najin and daughter Fatu, both also living at the conservancy in Kenya. Health problems or their ages — around 28 and 17, respectively — have left them unable to reproduce.

Wildlife experts and conservationists expressed deep regret over the prospect of the northern white rhino completely dying out. Technically, the species is already classified as extinct because it no longer exists in the wild, conservationists said.

“This is a distinct lineage of white rhino,” said Barbara Durrant, director of reproductive sciences at San Diego Zoo Global. “The loss of a population, especially of a mega-vertebrate like a rhino … is a significant loss in terms of genetic diversity.”

The zoo had had eight northern white rhinos in its Safari Park near Escondido over the years since 1972. The last one, a female named Nola, died in 2015.

This 1996 file photo shows northern white rhinos at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. Between 1972 and 2015, when the last one died, the zoo hosted eight northern white rhinos.
(Bob Grieser / Los Angeles Times )

All types of rhino are threatened. No more than 26,543 are left in Africa, and no more than 163 in Southeast Asia, along with at least 3,500 in other parts of Asia, according to Save the Rhino, a conservation charity based in Britain.

Poaching is the main cause of the decline and disappearance of rhinos from the wild. They are hunted for their horns, which are trafficked primarily in China and Vietnam for such uses as cures for illness.

More than 7,245 African rhinos have been lost to poaching over the last decade, including 1,028 last year in South Africa, according to Save the Rhino.

The poaching danger is often coupled with degradation and loss of habitat and the vulnerability the animals face living in conflict zones, said Bas Huijbregts, who leads the World Wildlife Fund’s wildlife conservation efforts in Africa.

The habitat of the northern white rhino included Congo, South Sudan and the Central African Republic — nations racked by war, political strife and lack of governance.

The northern white rhino “had the unfortunate characteristic of living in one of Africa’s most unstable regions,” Huijbregts said.

Various initiatives are being explored to preserve the species or possibly reintroduce it after the three remaining rhinos die. They include collecting the eggs from the ovaries of at least the younger of the two female northern white rhinos for possible in vitro fertilization.

“That hasn’t happened yet, but the technique is being optimized,” Durrant said.

San Diego’s Frozen Zoo is among at least two research facilities that already have northern white rhino semen.

Durrant said other possible options include using stem cell technology to create a northern white rhino embryo and implanting it in a surrogate female southern white rhino; creating a hybrid between the northern white rhino and the southern white rhino; or cloning the animal if that technology can be applied to the species.

“Once we create sperm and eggs from northern white rhino … we have to know how to mature those eggs in vitro, how to fertilize them in vitro, how to grow the embryos to a certain stage and then how to do embryo transfer,” Durrant said. “We have lot of work to do to develop those technologies.”

Science though is unlikely to bring back the herd, conservationists said.

“Let’s hope it will be another wake-up call for the world to understand that we have to do much more to combat the threat to rhinos,” Huijbregts said. “The key message here is that when the demand [for rhino horn] stops, the killing stops.”

Ask Ed Patchcoski if conservation works, and you’re likely to get an unqualified thumbs up.

The man who has served as Wyoming County’s federally designated District Conservationist since May of 1983 is stepping down at the end of this month.

Patchcoski’s love for the outdoors started in scouting, and he readily admits that unlike most of the people he initially served, he did not grow up on a farm.

With his dad a World War II veteran and mother a seamstress, Patchcoski grew up in the South Scranton/Moosic area and very much stayed close to the enduring values of family, which served him well in understanding why family farmers he would later serve stayed so close to the land.

He achieved the pinnacle of scouting by becoming an Eagle Scout in his teens, and by the early 1970s, he signed up for a Youth Conservation Corps program that essentially hooked him on the environment, and helped him see his role in helping to sustain it.

Patchcoski noted recently that he enrolled in Keystone College’s environmental science program run by Howard Jennings, and then went on to Penn State University’s main campus for a program in environmental resource management.

He said his first job was with the Lackawanna County Conservation District, and later went to Susquehanna County, then Westmoreland County in the western pat of the state before settling down in Wyoming County.

Patchcoski said he quickly learned that what had been taught from a textbook often bore little resemblance to what he faced in the field, and he realized that in order to succeed he would have to acquire some of it through a great deal of self study.

“What’s been so unique about my job is I’ve been able to work hands-on with private landowners, many of them farmers, in seeing how the soil can work for them,” Patchcoski said.

“There’s never been a dull moment, and each day presents itself with new challenges,” he added, noting that later in the day he would be visiting with a farmer who was concerned about a gas pipeline coming through that would disrupt some drain tile which had been put in years earlier so the farmer’s dad could successfully farm a field.

And, so it goes.

Although hired by the federal government initially to do a job through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Soil Conservation Service which provided technical assistance in controlling water and wind erosion of the soil, Patchcoski said that role changed in 1994 when a newly named agency - the Natural Resources Conservation Service - was directed to improve, protect, and conserve natural resources working with state and local agencies that had a similar mission.

He noted that his job was essentially still the same but rather than just deal with a landholder’s isolated problem he - and those he served - were more mindful of the impacts a single action might have on the bigger picture, usually downstream.

And, despite being paid by the government, Patchcoski said he has never seen himself as a bureaucrat, but rather as field technician ready to help facilitate what today are known as “best practices” in the areas of soil science, water quality and ecological restoration.

He readily acknowledges though that there have been moments where some farmers have seen him as an interloper, even though he says he’s really just there to help.

Patchcoski makes it clear that what he does is without regulatory power such as might be mandated by the federal Environmental Protection Agency or the state Department of Environmental Protection.

“There is good and bad with every project,” he said, and acknowledged that a constant across his nearly one-third of a century in Wyoming County - which is disected by the Susquehanna River and cris-crossed with creeks and streams - is flooding.

“The truth is money becomes available post-disaster,” he said, and “You’re suddenly presented with a new set of priorities with how to best manage the natural resources in front of you.”

He remembers vividly two projects he played an advisory role in and that was the rehabilitation of two former housing developments that led to municipal parks “which we enjoy today without thought of the upheavals faced just a generation earlier.”

He said lots of people go to Riverside Park and Lazybrook Park today and enjoy them for their recreational value, as they should.

Another project he likes to point to is the Kiwanis Wyoming County Fairgrounds where this past summer a very extensive effort was unveiled employing gutters placed onto seven buildings to capture rainwater into an underground reservoir. Tanks holding a combined 15,000 gallons of water, are available for non-potable use, like washing down the animals.

In the past the runoff from the various roofs often left a considerable amount of mud on the fairgrounds not to mention animal waste that got washed into nearby wetlands changing their ecological character.

Patchcoski acknowledged such projects are not cheap with initial seed money coming from private donors, including gas companies.

“The truth is we’re all in this together,” Patchcoski said, “and need to be mindful of the bigger picture.”

He said that the biggest thing he will miss when Jan. 1 rolls around is the people.

“The best part of my job is the people I’ve had the privilege to work for,” Patchcoski said.

“Conservation never sleeps. It is a 24-7 task that demands our very best.”

About Workman Publishing

Workman is a fiercely independent publisher of nonfiction books as well as a significant line of calendars.  Our books for adults and children are quirky, definitive, unexpected, useful, funny, handsome, well-crafted, and commercial. Our books are written by authors who are knowledgeable and passionate about their subjects. Our books improve lives.

Founded by Peter Workman in 1968, with the publication of Yoga 28 Day Exercise Plan –a book that is still in print nearly 50 years later—Workman has earned a reputation as a creator of brands: What to Expect® When You’re Expecting, Brain Quest®, Barbecue! Bible®, Younger Next Year®, Boynton on Board, and, more recently, 1,000 Places to See Before You Die®, Unlikely Friendships®, Indestructibles®, Scanimation®, Photicular®, the Big Fat Notebook™ series, and Paint by Sticker™, to name a few. Workman also launched an industry: It is no exaggeration to say that there was no calendar business before Workman invented the Page-A-Day® format.

Having published books in bottles and potato chip bags; books with wheels and with chalkboards attached; books with trains running through them; books that come with stickers, balls, washi tape, and more, Workman is recognized for its innovative packaging. Workman is also known for giving each of its authors full editorial, design, production, marketing, sales, and publicity support for the life of a book, and for bringing an intensive and creative sales and marketing focus to both its front list and its deep, active backlist. 

The publisher of iconic books like B. Kliban’s Cat, The Official Preppy HandbookThe Silver Palate Cookbook, and Gallop!, Workman is proud of its history and always excited about its future.

On November 3, Scribner will publish a unique and irresistible guide to properly holding dozens of our favorite animals: HOW TO HOLD ANIMALS by Toshimitsu Matsuhashi.

Originally published in Japan, HOW TO HOLD ANIMALS presents advice from four wildlife experts—a veterinarian, a pet store owner, a nature photographer, and a reptile handler—about how to pick up and hold more than thirty species using techniques that are safe for both animals and humans.

 

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Chock full of fascinating animal facts, tips, and warnings, interviews with the experts, and color photos on every page, HOW TO HOLD ANIMALS will amuse and inform animal lovers of all stripes, while encouraging readers to connect with nature hands on (and responsibly). Learn how to hold animals great and small, furry, scaly, and feathery, including snails, chipmunks, chickens, chinchillas, lizards, beetles, owls, grasshoppers, mice, and many, many more (Yes, spiders and snakes, too). This book contains all the excitement and information of a nature documentary, and reading it is the perfect reminder of the wonders to be found in the wild world around us.

Delcianna Winders

Assistant Clinical Professor & Director, Animal Law Litigation Clinic

  • Delcianna Winders
    Nina Johnson

Delcianna (Delci) Winders is a clinical professor of law at Lewis & Clark Law School, where she directs the Animal Law Litigation Clinic (ALLC)—the nation’s only clinic focused exclusively on animal law litigation.

Professor Winders’ animal law and administrative law scholarship has appeared in the Denver Law ReviewFlorida State Law ReviewOhio State Law JournalNYU Law Review, and Animal Law Review. She has also published extensively in the popular press, including The HillNational GeographicNewsweekNew York Daily NewsSalon, and U.S.A. Today.

Prior to joining the Lewis & Clark faculty, Winders was vice president and deputy general counsel for the PETA Foundation, the first academic fellow of the Harvard Animal Law & Policy Program, and a visiting scholar at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University.

Winders received her BA in Legal Studies with highest honors from the University California at Santa Cruz, and her JD from NYU School of Law.

Following law school, Winders clerked for the Hon. Martha Craig Daughtrey on the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and practiced animal law in a variety of settings. She has also taught animal law at Tulane University School of Law and Loyola University New Orleans College of Law. 

Winders has been interviewed by numerous major news outlets, gives frequent presentations, and was featured in O, The Oprah Magazine as one of “Six Women Who Dare.”

Specialty Areas & Course Descriptions

Specialty Areas & Course Descriptions

Academic Credentials

  • JD, 2006, New York University School of Law
  • BA, 2001, University of California, Santa Cruz

Bibliography

Scholarship

Captive Wildlife Under the Endangered Species Act, in Endangered Species Act (Donald C. Baur & Ya-Wei Li eds., 3d ed. forthcoming 2019) (with Jared Goodman and Heather Rally).

The Animal Welfare Act at Fifty, 24 Animal L. 155 (2019).

Animal Welfare Act Enforcement, 24 Animal L. 249 (2019).

Animal Welfare Act Interaction with Other Laws, 24 Animal L. 185 (2019).

Administrative License Renewal and Due Process—A Case Study, 45 Fla. St. U. L. Rev. 539 (2018).

Administrative Law Enforcement, Warnings, and Transparency
, 79 Ohio St. L. J. 451 (2018).

Fulfilling the Promise of EFOIA’s Proactive Disclosure Mandate
, 95 Denver L. Rev. 909 (2018). 

Captive Wildlife at a Crossroads—Sanctuaries, Accreditation, and Humane-Washing, 6 Animal Stud. J. 161 (2017).

Confronting Barriers to the Courtroom for Animal Advocates, 13 Animal L. Rev. 1 (2006).

Note, Combining Reflexive Law and False Advertising Law to Standardize “Cruelty-Free” Labeling of Cosmetics, 81 N.Y.U. L. Rev. 454 (2006).

Selected Other Writings

It’s Official—The Feds Are Protecting Animal Exploiters, Daily Caller (Apr. 26, 2019).

Costly USDA Proposal Would Spend More Tax Dollars and Help Animal Abusers, Daily Caller (Mar. 29, 2019).

Why Is It So Hard for President Trump to Flatly Forbid Trophy Hunting Imports?, N.Y. Daily News (Mar. 9, 2018).


Self-Policing Animal Research: Another Bad Idea from USDA, Law360 (May 25, 2018).

Year After Blackout, Public Still in the Dark about Animal Welfare Enforcement
, The Hill (Feb. 9, 2018).

Animal Welfare Act Could Protect Animals and Taxpayers — If It’s Enforced, U.S.A. Today (Dec. 26, 2017).


The Fish and Wildlife Service Must Atone for Tiger’s Death, Nat’l Geographic (Sept. 11, 2017).


Why Is the State of Wisconsin Propping Up a Cruel and Dying Industry?, AlterNet (Aug. 29, 2017).


USDA Blackout: Scrutinizing the Deletion of Thousands of Animal Welfare Act-Related Records, Am. Bar Ass’n Animal L. Comm. Newsletter (Summer 2017).

Wild Animal Acts Are Becoming a Thing of the Past, but Some Circuses Insist on Continuing Their Cruel Ways, AlterNet (June 26, 2017).


Ringling’s Big Cats Need New Homes—and They Could Be Headed for a Circus Overseas, Salon (June 11, 2017).

Ringling Is Dead, but Other Abusive Circuses Live, N.Y. Daily News (May 25, 2017).

Freedom of Information in Peril: What Transparency Looks Like in Trump’s Government, Salon (May 14, 2017).

Why I Sued the USDA, The Hill (Feb. 16, 2017).

Talkin' Pets News

August 22, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Gino Sassani - Lost World Reptiles

Producer - Lexi Lapp Adams

Reporter - Dan Adams

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media / Consultant - Bob Page

Special Guest - Author of "Unlikely Friendships", Jennifer S. Holland will join Jon & Talkin' Pets 8/22/20 at 5pm ET to discuss and give away her new book

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