Displaying items by tag: Veterinarians

 

JANUARY 2017

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 
 
January is National Walk Your Dog Month

January is National Walk Your Dog Month: Promote Exercise!

Did you make a New Year’s Resolution to get more exercise? This is a common goal due to the fact that exercise holds many physical and even mental health benefits. Coincidentally, January is National Walk Your Dog Month: the fitness partner that you need to keep your resolution just may be sitting next to you right now.

Read More About National Walk Your Dog Month

February is Pet Dental Health Month

February is Pet Dental Health Month: Let Your Patients Know!

As January comes to a close, it's a good idea to start reminding your patients and their families that February is focused on caring for their teeth and gums to prevent periodontal disease or other serious conditions.  

Continue Reading about Pet Dental Health Month

Pet Exercise Programs for Senior Dogs and Cats

Pet Exercise Programs for Senior Dogs and Cats

Exercise is essential to your senior pet’s health, whether you have a dog or a cat. It can keep them at a healthy weight, and increase physical and mental stamina, all of which lead to a better quality of life.

Continue Reading about Senior Pet Exercise Programs

Neutricks Vet Portal

Our Research is now Easier to Find

Our research has always been available in the vet portal on our website.  However we've gotten feedback lately that it was still hard to find.  So at the end of 2016, we added a link to "Research" right at the top of our site in the main navigation.  This is a shortcut to the vet portal and gives you a quicker way to access the research section.  We hope this change will make our research more convenient to vets and other animal professionals.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

 

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RALEIGH, N.C. (January 18, 2017) – The ever-increasing emergence of new canine DNA tests and testing laboratories has made choosing quality DNA testing providers and the right DNA tests for health and breeding decisions increasingly challenging for many owners, breeders and veterinarians. Working with a wide-spectrum of stakeholders in dog health, the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) "Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs" initiative will provide practical support to address these challenges.

With no existing national or international standards of accreditation, or standardization oversight group, there is a growing need for a reliable third party neutral organization that can provide guidance surrounding test reliability, laboratory quality assurance processes and procedures, test applicability by breed, and provide counseling regarding interpretation and best use of genetic test results. This is needed to support consumer confidence in DNA testing, educate consumers in the use of these tests, utilize these tests effectively as tools to reduce the incidence of inherited disease, and to reduce redundant international efforts. IPFD will work to coordinate and consolidate expertise, as well as ongoing and new work to increase the availability of resources to consumers.

The goal of this new IPFD initiative is to create an open access, searchable and sustainable online resource that will:

  • Catalog information provided voluntarily from commercial test providers for genetic testing in dogs;
  • Describe expertise, quality assurance, activities and resources of the test providers;
  • Host expert panel reviews of genetic tests, their reliability, and applicability;
  • Coordinate a program for standardized proficiency testing and potentially peer review and audit;
  • Collate/assemble existing and new resources for genetic counseling and education; and provide the foundation for future developments.

The initial phase of the initiative is to develop a working prototype of the online resource. Both the prototype and the final output will be hosted on the IPFD’s DogWellNet.com platform. The initiative will be guided by IPFD CEO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and Project Director This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and will be overseen by a multi-stakeholder steering committee set up by the IPFD. Initial funding for the prototype is provided through generous contributions from IPFD Founding Partners, the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA), and the AKC Canine Health Foundation.

 # # #

AKC Canine Health Foundation
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

International Partnership for Dogs
International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) is a non-profit organization, registered in Sweden, and initiated in 2014 by a diverse group of stakeholders in the international dog world. The IPFD mission is to facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of pedigreed dogs and all dogs worldwide. Visit the IPFD online at www.dogwellnet.com for more information.

Orthopedic Foundation for Animals
Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) is a 50 year old non-profit foundation with a specific mission to improve the health and welfare of companion animals through a reduction in the incidence of genetic disease. Visit the OFA online at www.ofa.org for more information.

FDA cites numerous health dangers


January 3, 2017
By: Edie Lau
For The VIN News Service

 


Photo courtesy of Valley Animal Hospital
Powdered medical gloves, such as this supply at a veterinary hospital in New Jersey, must be thrown away to comply with a federal ban that takes effect this month.

Powdered medical gloves are going the way of powdered wigs.

A once ubiquitous staple of doctors, powdered gloves are being thrown out of exam and operating rooms by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as of Jan. 18. The reason: The powder poses a variety of risks to wearers, patients and even bystanders.

The dangers include severe airway inflammation from inhaling the powder; wound inflammation and post-surgical adhesions from contact with the powder; and respiratory allergic reactions from breathing powder that carries proteins from natural rubber latex gloves. The most common type of powder used in gloves is cornstarch, according to the FDA.

The coming ban is absolute — there’s no grace period for using up existing supplies. “[T]he risks of illness or injury to individuals who are currently exposed to these devices is [as] equally unreasonable and substantial as it would be for future individuals that might be exposed to powdered gloves,” the FDA stated in a March 22, 2016, Federal Register notice proposing the ban. The ban was made final on Dec. 19.

Although glove use in veterinary medicine is not explicitly mentioned in the FDA rule, the prohibition applies in the veterinary sphere, too, an agency spokeswoman confirmed.

“The ban applies to powdered surgeon’s gloves, powdered patient examination gloves, and absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon’s glove that are already in commercial distribution and for these devices that are already sold to the ultimate user, such as small medical practices and hospitals. As such, it applies to ... gloves that are in use at veterinary practices,” the spokeswoman, Deborah Kotz, said by email.

Asked how the ban will be enforced, Kotz replied: “The FDA can take various enforcement actions, if necessary, to remove banned devices from the market, including seizure of the product, civil money penalties or criminal prosecution.”

She declined to say what criminal charges could be brought, or the potential size of fines.

The FDA recommends unused inventories of gloves be disposed of like any community solid waste, which usually is by burial in a landfill or by incineration.

Dr. Bruce Henderson, hospital director of Valley Animal Hospital in Clifton, New Jersey, estimates that his practice has $150 worth of powdered gloves in stock. “I’m just going to pitch them all in the garbage and buy new ones,” he said in a message-board discussion  on the Veterinary Information Network, an online community for the profession.

Henderson said he wouldn’t want to risk creating a situation in which employees claim harm from the use of banned gloves. Moreover, he’s already largely made the transition to powder-free gloves and prefers them.

“My associate requested non-powdered gloves when she started working here a few years ago, so we switched over. I like the non-powdered way better!!” he wrote on VIN.

Henderson explained by email that he likes not getting powder all over himself when he removes the gloves.

Some veterinarians are less enthused about switching.


VIN News Service photo
Dr. Karen Vanderloo, a practitioner in Wisconsin, has been dissatisfied so far with powder-less gloves. She hopes her clinic will find other styles that work better. “I’m sure we’ll all get used to the new gloves eventually,” she said.

Dr. Karen Vanderloo, a veterinarian at Oregon Veterinary Clinic near Madison, Wisconsin, is unimpressed with the performance of non-powdered gloves.

“Anticipating the change, we got a shipment of the powder-free gloves about six to eight weeks ago, and the general consensus was not favorable,” she told the VIN News Service by email. “They’re more difficult to put on, especially immediately after scrub prep before surgery, and because of the rolled cuff, are harder to put on in sterile fashion — the rolled edge keeps folding/rolling on itself.”

Other practitioners cite the difficulty of donning powder-less gloves with sweaty hands. That’s one advantage of powdered gloves, the FDA noted. “The benefits of powdered gloves appear to only include greater ease of donning and doffing, decreased tackiness and a degree of added comfort …” the agency stated in its notice of the final rule.

These benefits, the FDA concluded, “are nominal when compared to the risks posed by these devices.”

Long history of problems

The use of lubricant powders in surgical gloves dates to the late 19th century. At the time, the powders consisted of the spores of Lycopodium, an evergreen herb also known as club moss.

“By the 1930s, Lycopodium powder was recognized to cause wound granulomas and adhesion formation and was replaced by talcum powder (chemically, hydrous magnesium silicate) … In the 1940s, talcum powder (talc) was also recognized to be a cause of postoperative adhesions and granuloma formation. In 1947, modified cornstarch powder was introduced ...” according to the FDA.

Despite changes in powder type, problems persisted. In 1997, FDA issued a Medical Glove Powder Report that described the risks of glove powder and the state of the medical-glove market. Because no good alternatives to powdered gloves existed at the time, the agency opted not to ban them: “The report concluded that banning powdered gloves in 1997 would cause a market shortage of medical gloves, which could result in inferior glove products and increased costs to the U.S. health care system …”

Public pressure caused the FDA to revisit the issue some years later. Between 2008 and 2011, the agency received three petitions asking it to ban the use of cornstarch powder on latex and synthetic surgical and examining gloves.

One of the petitions accompanied a report published by the American Journal of Emergency Medicine in 2009 discussing the dangers of cornstarch powder on medical gloves. The authors stated that Germany banned surgical glove cornstarch powder in 1997, and that the United Kingdom’s purchasing and supply agency stopped purchasing gloves lubricated with cornstarch in 2000.

In 2011, the FDA put out a call for public comments on the risks and benefits of powdered gloves.

The agency also considered issuing a formal warning about the risks of gloves, but, as explained in the rule finalizing the ban, concluded that warning labels would be inadequate:

“[P]atients often do not know the type of gloves being worn by the health-care professional treating them, but are still exposed to the potential dangers. Similarly, glove powder’s ability to aerosolize and carry NRL (natural rubber latex) proteins exposes individuals to harm via inhalation or surface contact. Thus, some of the risks posed by glove powder can impact persons completely unaware or unassociated with its employment and without the opportunity to consider the devices’ labeling.”

Perhaps just as compellingly, the agency now believes that the market easily can handle the switch. “Our searches … revealed that the market is saturated with alternatives to powdered gloves, resulting in downward pressure on the prices of non-powdered gloves. In addition, the share of powdered medical gloves sales has been declining since at least 2000, while total sales of all disposable medical gloves have increased.”

Glove manufacturers largely have supported phasing out powder. In an interview published by the magazine Infection Control Today in late 2015, representatives of several manufacturers said unequivocally that the health concerns are valid. They also said alternative gloves are abundantly available. A representative of Halyard Health (formerly Kimberly-Clark Health Care) said her company sells only non-powdered exam gloves. Medline Industries' representative said his company offers 20 different powder-free options with synthetic polymer coatings inside the gloves to make donning and double-gloving easier.

Henry Schein, a leading distributor of medical, dental and veterinary supplies, states on its website that it carries “a wide selection of powder-free latex medical exam gloves manufactured by reputable companies,” and names seven makers plus its own private-label brand.

The FDA cites statistics suggesting that the timing of the ban should be no trouble for the vast majority of practitioners: “[R]ecent projections of annual gloves sales indicate that at least 93 percent of medical providers have switched to non-powdered gloves.”

The FDA notes that while manufacturers will be prohibited as of Jan. 18 from importing powdered gloves, they may export powdered gloves to countries where they are lawful. The agency does not address the ethics of exporting products that it has judged to present an unacceptable health risk.

VIN News Service staff writers Christy Corp-Minamiji and Phyllis DeGioia contributed to this report.

 
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DECEMBER 2016

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 

December Sales of Neutricks Benefit The Grey Muzzle Organization

Earlier this year, we launched a new program that is designed to help benefit select senior dog organizations in their efforts to care for and find foster homes for senior pets.  During December, sales of Neutricks will go to help The Grey Muzzle Organization.

Read More About Grey Muzzle

What is the Best Senior Dog Food for Small Dogs?

Small dogs are different from large dogs in many obvious ways, and in less obvious ways like nutrition as well. Choosing the right diet for your small dog as they get older will depend on many factors unique to your pet, but here is our guide to the issues you need to consider.

Continue Reading about Best Food for Small Dogs

Senior Cat Food 101: How to Know What’s Good for Kitty

Most people know that one calendar year is roughly equal to seven years of aging in a dog, but did you know that your twelve year old cat is roughly equal to a 64 year old person? One way that you can help your older cat stay healthy is to choose the right food for them, including making adjustments as they age or are diagnosed with certain common conditions. Here is our overview on how to choose a senior cat food that will benefit your pet’s health and quality of life.

Continue Reading about Senior Cat Food

Our Research is now Easier to Find

Our research has always been available in the vet portal on our website.  However we've gotten feedback lately that it was still hard to find.  So last month, we added a link to "Research" right at the top of our site in the main navigation.  This is a shortcut to the vet portal and gives you a quicker way to access the research section.  We hope this change will make our research more convenient to vets and other animal professionals.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

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Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711  

 
 
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NOVEMBER 2016

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 

November Sales of Neutricks Benefit The Grey Muzzle Organization

In September, we launched a new program that is designed to help benefit select senior dog organizations in their efforts to care for and find foster homes for senior pets.  During November and December, sales of Neutricks will go to help The Grey Muzzle Organization.

Read More About Grey Muzzle

It's Adopt A Senior Pet Month

All November long, Neutricks is helping promote Adopt A Senior Pet Month. It's the perfect time to consider bringing and older pet into your life!

Continue Reading about Adopt a Senior Pet Month

Pet Medical Insurance Beginner's Guide

As dogs and cats gets older, is pet medical insurance something that owners should consider? Like the many other insurance policies, there are numerous options available to choose from. Neutricks is helping owners get educated on this topic.

Continue Reading our Pet Medical Insurance Guide

Our Research is now Easier to Find

Our research has always been available in the vet portal on our website.  However we've gotten feedback lately that it was still hard to find.  So last month, we added a link to "Research" right at the top of our site in the main navigation.  This is a shortcut to the vet portal and gives you a quicker way to access the research section.  We hope this change will make our research more convenient to vets and other animal professionals.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

Share Neutricks with fellow vet colleagues
Thanks for reading!

Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711  

 

OCTOBER 2016

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rosco at Old Friends

October Neutricks Sales Benefit Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary

Starting in September, we launched a new program that is designed to help benefit select senior dog organizations in their efforts to care for and find foster homes for senior pets.  September and October's chosen organization is Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary in Tennessee.

Read More or Support Old Friends

CT Pet Show

Neutricks will be at the CT Pet Show This Weekend

This weekend, October 29-30, we will be attending the CT Pet Show in Hartford, CT!  You can stop by and say hi to us at Booth 2225.  Learn more about this weekend's event by watching our Neutricks Twitter account or clicking the link below to view the event's official site.

Read more about the CT Pet Show

 

Neutricks Vet Portal

Our Research is now Easier to Find

Our research has always been available in the vet portal on our website.  However we've gotten feedback lately that it was still hard to find.  So this month, we added a link to "Research" right at the top of our site in the main navigation.  This is a shortcut to the vet portal and gives you a quicker way to access the research section.  We hope this change will make our research more convenient to vets and other animal professionals.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

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Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA

 

WICHITA, Kan. – Wichita Area Technical College will become the first veterinary technician teaching program in the nation to begin using the SynDaver Synthetic Canine, SynDaver Labs announced Monday.

Veterinary Technology students at WATC will begin using the Synthetic Canine during the 2017 spring semester. The SynDaver Synthetic Canine was developed by SynDaver Labs in Tampa, Florida and offers students a realistic alternative to live animals for training purposes.

“The Veterinary Technology program at WATC is ecstatic to have the first SynDaver Synthetic Canine in the state,” said Amanda Hackerott RVT Program Director – Veterinary Technology. “The SynDaver Canine is an amazingly unique piece of health-science technology and it is only fitting that the largest technical school in Kansas has it.”

The SynDaver Synthetic Canine is made of water, fiber and salt, just like a real animal. It is designed to replace live animals and animal cadavers in veterinary medicine training.

The SynDaver can breathe and bleed just like a real dog. It has individual muscles, bones, and organs. Additionally, she can be operated on repeatedly without any risk to a live animal. The USDA mandates that every attempt is made to reduce, refine or replace live animal use.

By using the SynDaver Synthetic Canine, Veterinary Technology students at WATC will be provided hands-on experience without being exposed to carcinogenic formaldehyde used to preserve dead animals. Additionally, in the past when a live animal is used in training, there is a limit to how many procedures one student can perform. With the SynDaver, there is no limit per procedure; all students will be able to practice skills as much as necessary without violating USDA regulations.

Students will also be able to practice invasive procedures that would not be as practical to perform on a live animal. This broad scope of practice while in school will help to prepare WATC students to become leaders in the veterinary medical industry.

“We’re proud to be able to make a product, which is not only going to immediately save animal lives by replacing them in training, but it will also help to train those individuals who will be responsible for saving more animal lives in the future,” said Dr. Christopher Sakezles, founder of SynDaver Labs. 

About SynDaver Labs
SynDaver Labs manufactures synthetic humans for training in schools, hospitals and military installations. SynDaver has the world’s largest database of live-tissue properties and all SynDaver tissues are made from water, salts, and fibers. The company currently has 10 patents on these materials, processes, and related products. SynDaver Labs is headquartered in Tampa, Florida and employs nearly 100 people. The company also has an advanced research facility located in Phoenix, Arizona and is planning additional facilities in the U.S., China, Europe, and Latin America.


 

RALEIGH, N.C. (September 20, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce ongoing progress through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative.

Launched in February 2016, this comprehensive Initiative addresses important health concerns that include Lyme disease, bartonellosis, and ehrlichiosis, through much-needed research in diagnostics, disease pathogenesis and prevalence. Tick-borne diseases are an important group of emerging infectious diseases that impact both dogs and their people. As the geographic range of ticks continues to expand, all dogs can be affected by these diseases, year-round.

Through a $100,000 leadership gift from Kiki Courtelis, a longtime friend to animal health, and a combined $50,000 gift from the English Springer Spaniel Foundation and English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association, as well as generous gifts from many individuals, dog clubs, and foundations, the donations raised toward the Initiative, and matched by the American Kennel Club, are driving further progress in this important research for dogs. 

“When my veterinarian tells me that he diagnoses Lyme disease at least three times a week, I thought it was worthwhile to find an organization truly attacking these diseases to improve testing, treatment and cures,” said Kiki Courtelis.  “It means the world to me that I'm blessed to participate in CHF’s initiative, and be a part of improving the health of the dogs we love so much.”

To date, donations to the Initiative have resulted in the Foundation awarding a first round of five grants to improve diagnostics and enhance practical understanding of tick-borne diseases, including effects of these infections on blood cells, the canine blood donor population, disease prevalence in dogs, and treatment recommendations.

According to Mark Haglin, English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association president, “We have had many encounters over the years with tick-borne disease in our Springer Spaniels and we are very proud to play a role in this Initiative. Being closely associated with friends who are dealing with the devastating effects of Lyme disease, I hope these grants will bring some crossover results on the human side of treatment as well.”

“The Foundation chose this area of research important to canine health because we believe we can have an immediate and long-lasting impact on these diseases in dogs and their human companions,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF CEO. “Since launching the Initiative, many of CHF’s supporters have shared stories of a beloved dog being diagnosed with a tick-borne disease like babesiosis, anaplasmosis, or bartonellosis, or a human family member or friend with a diagnosis of Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis or Rocky Mountain spotted fever. The stories remind us of the urgent need to address these diseases that afflict dogs and people.”

To learn more about CHF’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, including research outcomes, free educational resources, and additional RFP announcements, visit www.akcchf.org/ticks. “Tick-borne diseases can surprise you, and the need for accurate diagnosis, proper treatment and prevention is critical,” said Brown.

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs and foundations, and individuals who are committed to the betterment of canine health through scientific research. During 2016, donations from new and lapsed donors (last donation 12/31/2013), will be generously matched for research dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club. Make an impact and double your donation today!

 # # #

About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.


 

                              PET PHILANTHROPY CIRCLE ANNOUNCES
                                  The 2016 "PET HERO AWARD WINNERS"

 

The Pet Hero Awards™ are notably the nation’s most prestigious animal welfare award ceremony showcasing people, organizations, corporations, veterinarians and pets that serve to inspire others to promote animal welfare.  These awards showcase the causes and needs of those who protect animals.Co-Chairs, Georgina Bloomberg, Prince Lorenzo Borghese and myself invite all Media to cover an amazing event. Email Gregg Oehler directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Pet Hero Awards ceremony at the elegant Gotham Hall in Manhattan on Friday October 7th, 2016.The 2016 Award winners include an all-star lineup.Naomi Judd will be receiving the Humanitarian of the Year Award for her tireless work in lobbying in Washington, DC to ensure the safe return of all service dogs that have served in the US Military.

 

Alison Eastwood, actress, daughter of Clint Eastwood, and Founder of the Eastwood Ranch Foundation, is the Animal Advocate of the Year, recognized for her outstanding success with saving animals from kill shelters in Southern California.
Dr. Robin Ganzert
, will be accepting the Outstanding Animal Welfare Organization award as CEO of the American Humane Association whose efforts have impacted hundreds of millions of animals. The Petco Foundation is being awarded the Foundation of the Year for helping 4.9 million pets find homes.  Katie Cleary, Executive Producer and Writer of the movie, Give Me Shelter on Netflix, President of Peace for Animals, and Founder and Editor in Chief of the Animal News Network is receiving the Animal Welfare Spokesperson Award. 

 

The Heart Organization has earned the Animal Welfare Education Award for their national youth education program that teaches compassion and respect for all living beings. Jamie’s Rescue in Miami brings focus on the challenges of rescuing street dogs in inner cities and is awarded the Rescue Organization of the Year.
Outstanding Junior of the Year, Matthew Talbot, proves we are never too young to make a difference in saving animal lives. The Outstanding Pet, Amazing Grace, a dog destined to a gruesome death in a gas chamber survived and inspires humans to end this cruel, unnecessary way of eliminating dogs. Tributes for all Pet Hero Award winners are available on the PetCircle.org website.

 "Humanitarian of the Year".... .......Naomi Judd                          

 "Animal Advocate of the Year"..... Alison Eastwood                 
"Foundation of the Year"...............The Petco Foundation 
 "Animal Welfare Spokesperson Award"....Katie Cleary 
"Animal Welfare Education Award"....The Heart Organization
"Rescue Organization of the Year"....Jamie's Rescue
"Outstanding Junior of the Year".......Matthew Talbot
"Outstanding Animal Welfare Organization"...American Humane Association, 
      Robin Ganzert...President/CEO

The Pet Philanthropy Circle will commemorate this special 5th anniversary with a VIP Cocktail Reception, the Awards Program, the Alex Donner Orchestra and entertainment by Beau Hulse.  This optional black tie event will be Co-hosted by Jewel Morris, Founder of the Pet Philanthropy Circle and David Frei, NBC Commentator and former Westminster Dog Show Host

 

Sponsors are welcome and currently include Subaru of America, the Park Lane Hotel, The Petco Foundation, American Humane Association, Hamptons Magazine, and Hamptons Pet "The Luxury Global Pet Magazine".

 

By showcasing these outstanding contributions, the Pet Philanthropy Circle hopes to inspire everyone to become involved in defending the rights of animals. Honorees and guests fly in from around the country to attend this enlightening and entertaining celebration of animals and the causes that protect them. 

For tickets www.petphilanthropycircle.com/tickets or call 631 255- 7911 

              

 
 
 
 

AUGUST 2016

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 

Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome: What Patients Are Learning

Throughout the year, we publish articles on different topics to help educate senior pet owners so they have a better understanding of what is going on with their best friend.  Our current focus around our articles is to help inform and educate owners on the details, facts and symptoms around Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome, and how they can approach the issue with their veterinarian.

As part of this "CDS 101" education, we at Neutricks want to make sure you as that veterinarian know what the owners are seeing so you can be prepared for any questions or concerns they may have.

Review Neutricks Blog for CDS Articles

New Peer Reviewed Article on CDS and Apoaequorin

We are pleased to share with you a recently published peer reviewed veterinary journal article on cognitive dysfunction syndrome and apoaequorin, the active ingredient in Neutricks, titled "A novel mechanism for cognitive engagement in aged dogs with the use of a calcium-buffering protein".

Download & Read Article | See All Research on the Vet Portal

 

Neutricks Vet Portal

The portal is an easy way to see who carries Neutricks, how to carry Neutricks at your practice, a complete list of our distributors, marketing materials for your practice or store, research materials, and more.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

Share Neutricks with fellow vet colleagues
Thanks for reading!

Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA

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