Displaying items by tag: Veterinarians

 

The Guidelines and accompanying Client Brochure provide a guide to veterinary practitioners in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of these common infectious diseases in cats

[HILLSBOROUGH, NJ – January 2020] On Thursday, January 9, the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) will release updated Feline Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines to the veterinary community, which will be published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. In publishing these Guidelines, the AAFP aims to provide the most current information about feline retrovirus infections to veterinary practitioners so they may optimize the care and management of their feline patients. In addition, the Client Brochure provides cat caregivers with information regarding transmission, testing, prevalence, and precautions. These Guidelines focus on feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infections, which are found in cats worldwide. The spread of these viruses can be minimized through education, testing, and vaccinations.

The updated Guidelines represent a consensus of current information compiled by an international panel of researchers and practitioners, and is an update of the AAFP’s heavily referenced 2008 Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines.
 
“Education and early testing can greatly assist in the treatment and management of feline retrovirus infections. Routine veterinary care, when cats are well and when they are sick, can lead to better care and decrease the spread of infection. We are pleased to present these Guidelines to support both veterinary professionals and cat caregivers in the management of these illnesses. We further stress the partnership between veterinarians and cat owners in caring for infected cats because with regular healthcare and reduced stress, cats infected with retroviruses, especially FIV, may live many healthy years,” said Heather O’Steen, CEO, AAFP.
 
“The 2020 Feline Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines contain much new information about feline leukemia and feline immunodeficiency virus infections. The Guidelines were written by an international panel of experts and included not only retrovirus researchers, but veterinarians working in private practice and in shelters. We hope these Guidelines will be of practical use for all veterinarians. The panel is especially proud to have endorsement of the Guidelines by the International Society of Feline Medicine,” said Retrovirus Guidelines Co-Chair Susan Little, DVM, DABVP (Feline).
 
Julie Levy, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DABVP (Shelter Medicine) added, “These guidelines address rapidly evolving knowledge about how testing results, clinical expression, and prognosis for FeLV may change over time relative to the cat’s current immune response and resulting levels of virus in circulation, how quantitative testing may be used to better inform clinical decision-making, and an emerging trend in which screening for FeLV and FIV is increasingly shifting from animal shelters, where cats are adopted, to veterinary practices, where animals receive comprehensive care.”
 
 
 
More About Retroviruses:
These Guidelines and Client Brochure represent current knowledge on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of retrovirus infections in cats. Infections with FeLV and FIV are associated with a variety of clinical signs and can impact quality of life and longevity. Although vaccines are available for FeLV in many countries and for FIV in some countries, identification of infected cats remains an important factor for preventing new infections. The retrovirus status of every cat at risk of infection should be known. Cats should be tested as soon as possible after they are acquired, following exposure to an infected cat or a cat of unknown infection status, prior to vaccination against FeLV or FIV, and whenever clinical illness occurs. It might not be possible to determine a cat’s infection status based on testing at a single point in time; repeat testing using different methods could be required. Although FeLV and FIV infections can be associated with clinical disease, some infected cats, especially those infected with FIV, can live for many years with good quality of life. There is a paucity of data evaluating treatments for infected cats, especially antiretroviral and immunomodulatory drugs. Management of infected cats is focused on effective preventive health care strategies and prompt identification and treatment of illness, as well as limiting spread of infection. 
 

Prevalence and the Spread of Retroviruses in Cats:
FIV: Feline immunodeficiency virus is more commonly found in male cats and cats that fight with other cats. It is found less often in kittens and neutered adult cats. The virus is spread primarily through saliva and is usually passed to other cats by bite wounds. In North America, about 3 to 5% of tested cats are found to be infected with FIV.
 
FeLV: Feline leukemia virus infection is more commonly spread from mother to kittens. The virus can also be spread between cats that live together or those that fight. It is mainly spread in saliva during grooming and when food and water bowls are shared. The virus is less often spread through urine, feces, or nasal discharge. In North America, 4% of tested cats are found to be infected with the virus.
 
 
Prevention:
There are no vaccines marketed in the United States or Canada that can protect cats from FIV infection.
 
Vaccines to protect cats from FeLV infection are available. The vaccine is recommended for all kittens, again one year later, and for cats that have ongoing risk of infection. Adult indoor-only cats living alone or with uninfected cats may not need to be vaccinated after the first two years. Veterinarians will help assess an individual cat’s vaccination needs.
 
To access the Feline Retrovirus Guidelines, visit catvets.com/retroviruses. Cat caregivers can learn more about feline retroviruses at catfriendly.com/felv and catfriendly.com/fiv.


Retrovirus Guidelines Press Preview


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RALEIGH, NC (November 5, 2019) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) announces another year of growth in grants awarded for canine health research.  In 2019, CHF has awarded 46 new research grants totaling over $2.8 million to benefit canine health. CHF currently manages 135 active grants representing funding of more than $10.8 million, bringing their total funding to $52.9 million for canine health research and educational programs. Outcomes from this funding have resulted in more than 775 publications in peer-reviewed journals since their founding in 1995.In addition to addressing overall health concerns for all dogs, CHF’s ongoing hemangiosarcoma, tick-borne disease, and epilepsy research initiatives provided expanded funding opportunities for these important diseases during 2019. CHF and their donors continued funding for new educational grants to support the American Kennel Club/AKC Canine Health Foundation/Theriogenology Foundation Small Animal Theriogenology Residency Program, and their Clinician-Scientist Fellowship Program.As part of the educational outreach component of their mission, CHF sponsored five webinars by CHF-funded investigators on topics such as CBD oil use for dogs, updates on canine influenza, canine degenerative myelopathy, early maternal influences on puppies being raised as service dogs, and discussion of spay/neuter on overall health, providing continuing education for veterinary professionals, dog owners, and breeders. Also, CHF hosted the National Parent Club Canine Health Conference in St. Louis, MO in August. The biennial event, sponsored by Purina, brought together researchers, American Kennel Club (AKC) Parent Club members, breeders, veterinarians, veterinary residents, and veterinary students to discuss the latest findings in canine health research.“We are honored to collaborate with the best scientists, breeders, veterinarians and dog lovers to achieve better health for all dogs,” states CHF CEO, Dr. Diane Brown. “As we enter our 25th year in 2020, we look forward to creating more opportunities to advance canine health research."CHF earned a highest four-star rating from Charity Navigator again this year and maintained its platinum rating from GuideStar, demonstrating programs excellence and that it exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, accountability and transparency, and outperforms most charities in its category.Matched funding opportunities provided a means for CHF donors to double their impact on canine health in 2019. The AKC continues to match donations from new and lapsed donors and the American German Shepherd Dog Charitable Foundation is matching donations for hemangiosarcoma research.With gratitude for their donors’ support, CHF continues to achieve its mission to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding humane scientific research and supporting the dissemination of health information to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Donation information can be found at akcchf.org/donate.

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About CHF

Since 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science to address the health needs of all dogs. With more than $52 million in funding to date, the Foundation provides grants for the highest quality canine health research and shares information on the discoveries that help prevent, treat and cure canine diseases. The Foundation meets and exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, as demonstrated by their highest four-star Charity Navigator rating and GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency. Learn more at www.akcchf.org.

Talkin' Pets News

August 25, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Matt Nall - Superpet Tampa Florida

Producer - Daisey Charlotte

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer / Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guest - Adam Peyman - Programs and Operations Manager for the Wildlife Department Humane Society International at 510pm EST

 

JUNE 2017

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 

Does your Veterinarian have Specific Senior Pet Programs for the pet and their pet parents?


In the recent DVM360 veterinary magazine survey, it was reported that most of veterinary hospitals do not have a special emphasis on Senior Pet Wellness. If your veterinarian or your practice does have a Senior Pet Wellness program – Congratulations!


For those who don’t there are great resources available from the AVMA, AAHA and even the DVM360 magazine web version. All these will have procedures, brochures and suggestions for a successful Senior Pet Program.

Here are some suggestions gleaned from these resources:

Make sure the entire staff is on the same page. You can use a chart that lists recommended procedures for every age. The chart can function as a reference for receptionists when they are checking in the patient.


Talk to your lab about custom panels or develop your own Senior Pet Panel.


Teach Team Members. Make certain that all on your team know the basics about common problems in senior pets.


Implement a Senior Pet Discount. A senior pet really needs to be seen more often so a discount could encourage more frequent visits.

Interested in Adding a Senior Wellness Program to your Practice?

Neutricks encourages you to do an on line research at DVM360, the AVMA or AAHA and check out all the great resources.

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

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Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA

MAY 2017

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 

It's Flea and Tick Prevention Season: Are Your Patients Protected?


Spring brings longer days, warmer temperatures, and the return of many common pests, including fleas and ticks. These common insects can be at best annoying, and at worst harmful to your pet’s health. Luckily, there are many ways you can protect them.

Continue Reading Our Flea and Tick Article

June Belongs to the Cats!
(and some dogs)


The month of June is a big month for our feline friends. It’s Adopt-a-Cat Month, and Adopt-a-Shelter-Cat Month, too. Additionally, it’s National Pet Preparedness Month.

Weeks:
1st Week in June: Pet Appreciation Week
The week after Father’s Day: Take Your Dog to Work Week

Days:
June 4: Hug Your Cat Day
June 9: World Pet Memorial Day
June 21: National Dog Party Day
June 23: Take Your Dog to Work Day

Buy Neutricks Directly From Us Via Our New Web Store

March and April were busy for us, and part of what we were working on included the launch of our new Neutricks Web Store, where we've made it easier for you to buy Neutricks for Dogs and Neutricks for Cats directly from us! 

Cognitive Health Resources for Veterinarians

The Neutricks Vet Portal is an area on the Neutricks website that provides research, marketing materials, a vet directory and other resources for veterinarians to ensure you are have what you need to promote, educate and consult on Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome with your patients.

  

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

Share Neutricks with fellow vet colleagues
 
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Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA

 

APRIL 2017

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 

May is National Pet Month and More

Spring is a time to recharge, shake off that cabin fever and get back to life outside as the weather warms. Take time during May to remind patient families to celebrate these holidays or address these areas of topic with their pets:

National Pet Month: Celebrate your pet all month long!

Flea and Tick Prevention: Humans and pets aren't the only animals coming out of hiberation! Be sure to advise patients to treat and protect their pets from fleas, ticks and other common pests. 

Microchipping: Make sure your patients have ID tags and/or microchips to keep them safe and easy to find when they're lost! We recently featured an article on our blog during National Pet ID Week.

Spring Cleaning Safety: Make sure patient families are aware of ways to protect the health of their pets during the annual spring cleaning festivities and rituals!  Tell them they can learn more by downloading our new "Spring Guide for Senior Pets" eBook.

Buy Neutricks Directly From Us Via Our New Web Store

March and April were busy for us, and part of what we were working on included the launch of our new Neutricks Web Store, where we've made it easier for you to buy Neutricks for Dogs and Neutricks for Cats directly from us! 

Cognitive Health Resources for Veterinarians

The Neutricks Vet Portal is an area on the Neutricks website that provides research, marketing materials, a vet directory and other resources for veterinarians to ensure you are have what you need to promote, educate and consult on Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome with your patients.

  
 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

Share Neutricks with fellow vet colleagues
    
Thanks for reading!

Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA

 

MARCH 2017

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 

April: A Busy Month for Pet Holidays!

April is a popular time to be a pet or their parents! Take time this month to remind patient families to celebrate or observe the following holidays with their pets:

National Pet Day: April 11th is a great day for all pets!

Easter: We'll be publishing articles in April around Easter and safety tips to remember for your dog or cat. 

National Pet ID Week: Make sure your patients have ID tags and/or microchips to keep them safe and easy to find when they're lost!

Animal Cruelty Awareness Week: Learn the signs and stay informed about animal cruelty in your community.

Be the first to get our new "Spring Guide for Senior Pets" eBook

New Blog & New Store!

March has been a busy month for us! After our trip out to Las Vegas for the annual Western Veterinary Conference, we kicked things into high gear and released an upgraded version of our Senior Pet Wellness Blog and put the finishing touches on and released our new Neutricks Web Store, where we've made it easier for you to buy Neutricks for Dogs and Neutricks for Cats directly from us! 

Cognitive Health Resources for Veterinarians

The Neutricks Vet Portal is an area on the Neutricks website that provides research, marketing materials, a vet directory and other resources for veterinarians to ensure you are have what you need to promote, educate and consult on Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome with your patients.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

  

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

Share Neutricks with fellow vet colleagues
 
Thanks for reading!

Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA

 

JANUARY 2017

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 
 
January is National Walk Your Dog Month

January is National Walk Your Dog Month: Promote Exercise!

Did you make a New Year’s Resolution to get more exercise? This is a common goal due to the fact that exercise holds many physical and even mental health benefits. Coincidentally, January is National Walk Your Dog Month: the fitness partner that you need to keep your resolution just may be sitting next to you right now.

Read More About National Walk Your Dog Month

February is Pet Dental Health Month

February is Pet Dental Health Month: Let Your Patients Know!

As January comes to a close, it's a good idea to start reminding your patients and their families that February is focused on caring for their teeth and gums to prevent periodontal disease or other serious conditions.  

Continue Reading about Pet Dental Health Month

Pet Exercise Programs for Senior Dogs and Cats

Pet Exercise Programs for Senior Dogs and Cats

Exercise is essential to your senior pet’s health, whether you have a dog or a cat. It can keep them at a healthy weight, and increase physical and mental stamina, all of which lead to a better quality of life.

Continue Reading about Senior Pet Exercise Programs

Neutricks Vet Portal

Our Research is now Easier to Find

Our research has always been available in the vet portal on our website.  However we've gotten feedback lately that it was still hard to find.  So at the end of 2016, we added a link to "Research" right at the top of our site in the main navigation.  This is a shortcut to the vet portal and gives you a quicker way to access the research section.  We hope this change will make our research more convenient to vets and other animal professionals.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

 

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RALEIGH, N.C. (January 18, 2017) – The ever-increasing emergence of new canine DNA tests and testing laboratories has made choosing quality DNA testing providers and the right DNA tests for health and breeding decisions increasingly challenging for many owners, breeders and veterinarians. Working with a wide-spectrum of stakeholders in dog health, the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) "Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs" initiative will provide practical support to address these challenges.

With no existing national or international standards of accreditation, or standardization oversight group, there is a growing need for a reliable third party neutral organization that can provide guidance surrounding test reliability, laboratory quality assurance processes and procedures, test applicability by breed, and provide counseling regarding interpretation and best use of genetic test results. This is needed to support consumer confidence in DNA testing, educate consumers in the use of these tests, utilize these tests effectively as tools to reduce the incidence of inherited disease, and to reduce redundant international efforts. IPFD will work to coordinate and consolidate expertise, as well as ongoing and new work to increase the availability of resources to consumers.

The goal of this new IPFD initiative is to create an open access, searchable and sustainable online resource that will:

  • Catalog information provided voluntarily from commercial test providers for genetic testing in dogs;
  • Describe expertise, quality assurance, activities and resources of the test providers;
  • Host expert panel reviews of genetic tests, their reliability, and applicability;
  • Coordinate a program for standardized proficiency testing and potentially peer review and audit;
  • Collate/assemble existing and new resources for genetic counseling and education; and provide the foundation for future developments.

The initial phase of the initiative is to develop a working prototype of the online resource. Both the prototype and the final output will be hosted on the IPFD’s DogWellNet.com platform. The initiative will be guided by IPFD CEO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and Project Director This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and will be overseen by a multi-stakeholder steering committee set up by the IPFD. Initial funding for the prototype is provided through generous contributions from IPFD Founding Partners, the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA), and the AKC Canine Health Foundation.

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AKC Canine Health Foundation
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

International Partnership for Dogs
International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) is a non-profit organization, registered in Sweden, and initiated in 2014 by a diverse group of stakeholders in the international dog world. The IPFD mission is to facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of pedigreed dogs and all dogs worldwide. Visit the IPFD online at www.dogwellnet.com for more information.

Orthopedic Foundation for Animals
Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) is a 50 year old non-profit foundation with a specific mission to improve the health and welfare of companion animals through a reduction in the incidence of genetic disease. Visit the OFA online at www.ofa.org for more information.

FDA cites numerous health dangers


January 3, 2017
By: Edie Lau
For The VIN News Service

 


Photo courtesy of Valley Animal Hospital
Powdered medical gloves, such as this supply at a veterinary hospital in New Jersey, must be thrown away to comply with a federal ban that takes effect this month.

Powdered medical gloves are going the way of powdered wigs.

A once ubiquitous staple of doctors, powdered gloves are being thrown out of exam and operating rooms by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as of Jan. 18. The reason: The powder poses a variety of risks to wearers, patients and even bystanders.

The dangers include severe airway inflammation from inhaling the powder; wound inflammation and post-surgical adhesions from contact with the powder; and respiratory allergic reactions from breathing powder that carries proteins from natural rubber latex gloves. The most common type of powder used in gloves is cornstarch, according to the FDA.

The coming ban is absolute — there’s no grace period for using up existing supplies. “[T]he risks of illness or injury to individuals who are currently exposed to these devices is [as] equally unreasonable and substantial as it would be for future individuals that might be exposed to powdered gloves,” the FDA stated in a March 22, 2016, Federal Register notice proposing the ban. The ban was made final on Dec. 19.

Although glove use in veterinary medicine is not explicitly mentioned in the FDA rule, the prohibition applies in the veterinary sphere, too, an agency spokeswoman confirmed.

“The ban applies to powdered surgeon’s gloves, powdered patient examination gloves, and absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon’s glove that are already in commercial distribution and for these devices that are already sold to the ultimate user, such as small medical practices and hospitals. As such, it applies to ... gloves that are in use at veterinary practices,” the spokeswoman, Deborah Kotz, said by email.

Asked how the ban will be enforced, Kotz replied: “The FDA can take various enforcement actions, if necessary, to remove banned devices from the market, including seizure of the product, civil money penalties or criminal prosecution.”

She declined to say what criminal charges could be brought, or the potential size of fines.

The FDA recommends unused inventories of gloves be disposed of like any community solid waste, which usually is by burial in a landfill or by incineration.

Dr. Bruce Henderson, hospital director of Valley Animal Hospital in Clifton, New Jersey, estimates that his practice has $150 worth of powdered gloves in stock. “I’m just going to pitch them all in the garbage and buy new ones,” he said in a message-board discussion  on the Veterinary Information Network, an online community for the profession.

Henderson said he wouldn’t want to risk creating a situation in which employees claim harm from the use of banned gloves. Moreover, he’s already largely made the transition to powder-free gloves and prefers them.

“My associate requested non-powdered gloves when she started working here a few years ago, so we switched over. I like the non-powdered way better!!” he wrote on VIN.

Henderson explained by email that he likes not getting powder all over himself when he removes the gloves.

Some veterinarians are less enthused about switching.


VIN News Service photo
Dr. Karen Vanderloo, a practitioner in Wisconsin, has been dissatisfied so far with powder-less gloves. She hopes her clinic will find other styles that work better. “I’m sure we’ll all get used to the new gloves eventually,” she said.

Dr. Karen Vanderloo, a veterinarian at Oregon Veterinary Clinic near Madison, Wisconsin, is unimpressed with the performance of non-powdered gloves.

“Anticipating the change, we got a shipment of the powder-free gloves about six to eight weeks ago, and the general consensus was not favorable,” she told the VIN News Service by email. “They’re more difficult to put on, especially immediately after scrub prep before surgery, and because of the rolled cuff, are harder to put on in sterile fashion — the rolled edge keeps folding/rolling on itself.”

Other practitioners cite the difficulty of donning powder-less gloves with sweaty hands. That’s one advantage of powdered gloves, the FDA noted. “The benefits of powdered gloves appear to only include greater ease of donning and doffing, decreased tackiness and a degree of added comfort …” the agency stated in its notice of the final rule.

These benefits, the FDA concluded, “are nominal when compared to the risks posed by these devices.”

Long history of problems

The use of lubricant powders in surgical gloves dates to the late 19th century. At the time, the powders consisted of the spores of Lycopodium, an evergreen herb also known as club moss.

“By the 1930s, Lycopodium powder was recognized to cause wound granulomas and adhesion formation and was replaced by talcum powder (chemically, hydrous magnesium silicate) … In the 1940s, talcum powder (talc) was also recognized to be a cause of postoperative adhesions and granuloma formation. In 1947, modified cornstarch powder was introduced ...” according to the FDA.

Despite changes in powder type, problems persisted. In 1997, FDA issued a Medical Glove Powder Report that described the risks of glove powder and the state of the medical-glove market. Because no good alternatives to powdered gloves existed at the time, the agency opted not to ban them: “The report concluded that banning powdered gloves in 1997 would cause a market shortage of medical gloves, which could result in inferior glove products and increased costs to the U.S. health care system …”

Public pressure caused the FDA to revisit the issue some years later. Between 2008 and 2011, the agency received three petitions asking it to ban the use of cornstarch powder on latex and synthetic surgical and examining gloves.

One of the petitions accompanied a report published by the American Journal of Emergency Medicine in 2009 discussing the dangers of cornstarch powder on medical gloves. The authors stated that Germany banned surgical glove cornstarch powder in 1997, and that the United Kingdom’s purchasing and supply agency stopped purchasing gloves lubricated with cornstarch in 2000.

In 2011, the FDA put out a call for public comments on the risks and benefits of powdered gloves.

The agency also considered issuing a formal warning about the risks of gloves, but, as explained in the rule finalizing the ban, concluded that warning labels would be inadequate:

“[P]atients often do not know the type of gloves being worn by the health-care professional treating them, but are still exposed to the potential dangers. Similarly, glove powder’s ability to aerosolize and carry NRL (natural rubber latex) proteins exposes individuals to harm via inhalation or surface contact. Thus, some of the risks posed by glove powder can impact persons completely unaware or unassociated with its employment and without the opportunity to consider the devices’ labeling.”

Perhaps just as compellingly, the agency now believes that the market easily can handle the switch. “Our searches … revealed that the market is saturated with alternatives to powdered gloves, resulting in downward pressure on the prices of non-powdered gloves. In addition, the share of powdered medical gloves sales has been declining since at least 2000, while total sales of all disposable medical gloves have increased.”

Glove manufacturers largely have supported phasing out powder. In an interview published by the magazine Infection Control Today in late 2015, representatives of several manufacturers said unequivocally that the health concerns are valid. They also said alternative gloves are abundantly available. A representative of Halyard Health (formerly Kimberly-Clark Health Care) said her company sells only non-powdered exam gloves. Medline Industries' representative said his company offers 20 different powder-free options with synthetic polymer coatings inside the gloves to make donning and double-gloving easier.

Henry Schein, a leading distributor of medical, dental and veterinary supplies, states on its website that it carries “a wide selection of powder-free latex medical exam gloves manufactured by reputable companies,” and names seven makers plus its own private-label brand.

The FDA cites statistics suggesting that the timing of the ban should be no trouble for the vast majority of practitioners: “[R]ecent projections of annual gloves sales indicate that at least 93 percent of medical providers have switched to non-powdered gloves.”

The FDA notes that while manufacturers will be prohibited as of Jan. 18 from importing powdered gloves, they may export powdered gloves to countries where they are lawful. The agency does not address the ethics of exporting products that it has judged to present an unacceptable health risk.

VIN News Service staff writers Christy Corp-Minamiji and Phyllis DeGioia contributed to this report.

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