Displaying items by tag: HSUS

One year ago, the Humane Society of the United States was in the midst of removing nearly 4,000 beagles from Envigo, a mass breeding facility that received multiple Animal Welfare Act violations for issues such as inadequate veterinary care and insufficient food. If not for this historic transfer agreement, many of these dogs were bound for animal testing laboratories across the country. Instead, we placed them with over 100 of our shelter and rescue partners around the country (in 29 states!) to find loving homes.

Dogs like Franny, who had spent her life at Envigo being forced to breed puppies to be sold to laboratories, and Enzo, a young puppy likely destined for a laboratory, are among the beagles who have underscored the significance of this historic operation.

VIDEO of Franny’s transformation and life in new home

VIDEO of Enzo’s first year in new home

“These dogs have spent the last year learning how to walk on leashes, finding the most comfortable spot on the couch, and becoming treasured family members in their loving homes,” said Kitty Block, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States. “Dogs used in laboratories typically live short, painful lives. It’s heartbreaking to think about what would have happened to these beagles if Envigo had been able to sell them to laboratories. Animal experimentation is undeniably cruel while non-animal models, such as organs-on-chips, computer modelling and human cell-based tests, are better for the animals and for humans. We were able to save these lucky few beagles, but more are being bred and sold to laboratories every day--it’s on all of us to make this change.”

As the Humane Society of the United States celebrates the happy stories from the loving adopters of these dogs, we are doing all we can to ensure no other company steps in to simply replace those dogs. On average, nearly 60,000 dogs are used in experiments each year in the U.S. and tens of thousands more are held in laboratory breeding facilities. Join us in calling on state and federal officials to end experiments on dogs and invest in science that doesn’t cause animal suffering.

We are leading a worldwide campaign to ensure that animal tests and experiments are systematically replaced with non-animal alternatives that are better at predicting how the human body will respond to drugs, chemicals and medical devices and more effective for researching how human diseases develop and respond to treatment.

In pursuit of that goal, in the U.S., we have secured funding commitments from Congress to ensure that Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration accelerate the development of non-animal methods and reduce or eliminate animal testing. We are also pushing the FDA to ensure that non-animal methods for drugs, medical devices and vaccines are being developed, approved and used instead of animal tests. Read more about our efforts to prevent dogs like Enzo from suffering in the name of science.

Captive-bred lion hunts for sale against convention rules; potential violations of state law; hundreds of hunts targeting rhinos, leopards, elephants; practices that violate hunting ethics; custom products made from skin and claws

 

WASHINGTON (March 7, 2023)—A shocking undercover investigation released by the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International exposed the hypocrisy that the trophy hunting industry uses to promote the killing of imperiled species. The Safari Club International convention in Nashville, Tennessee Feb. 22 through 25, hosted over 850 exhibitors from more than 140 countries peddling trophy hunts and products made from animal skins and claws. The event brought in about $6 million in revenue for SCI to further its lobbying efforts to roll back laws and regulations that protect vulnerable species from trophy hunting, including Endangered Species Act protections.

Trophy hunts were offered in at least 65 countries with the majority in South Africa, Canada, Namibia, Zimbabwe and New Zealand. Almost 100 outfitters offered elephant hunts, at least 115 offered leopard hunts, 98 offered lion and giraffe hunts, 89 offered hippo hunts, and 39 offered rhino hunts. On exhibitors’ websites, critically endangered animals, like the forest elephant and the black rhino, were also available to hunt, as well as captive animals such as scimitar oryx, a species classified as extinct in the wild and bred almost exclusively for trophy hunting.

The investigation revealed hunting trips sold from $2,500 to $143,000 with menus so hunters could “add-on” animals in addition to their primary targets. Most African carnivore hunts were advertised to include baiting—a practice that uses carcasses of other animals, like impala and zebras, or other items to lure the target species, which violates fair chase ethics and causes conservation issues by drawing out animals from protected areas into hunting zones.

Among the most revealing investigation findings is a recorded conversation with an exhibitor who encouraged the investigator to schedule a white rhino hunt before it is too late as the species is on the brink of extinction. They stated: “The one that’s gonna be closed down the soonest to import to the United States because of the numbers going down is the rhino… and if you want something Africa[n], you have to get the rhino as soon as possible.”

Outfitters were also vocal about “bending the rules” and broke policies to make a sale. One vendor violated the convention’s own policy against promoting captive lion hunts—a cruel, senseless practice condemned by the South African and U.S. governments and many others. He told the investigator, “You can hunt...captive bred lions in South Africa, cause this way you’re not impacting the wild lions...but they...catch their own animals; they’re as wild as can be.” Another told the HSUS/HSI investigator, “...we’ve got hunters that really can’t walk at all…we do bend our own rules a little and we shoot them from the truck...we don’t have a problem with it.” Hunting from a vehicle is illegal in many places because it violates fair chase ethics and invites numerous safety hazards.

Kitty Block, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, said: “Despite the public’s growing disdain for trophy hunting, Safari Club International’s convention celebrates the senseless killing of animals, putting their deaths up for sale around the world, all to be turned into nothing more than trinkets and stuffed trophies. Make no mistake: This is an industry that threatens our most imperiled and ecologically important wildlife. As one of the world’s largest consumers of hunting trophies of imperiled species, the United States government has the responsibility to end hunting trophy imports.”

Jeff Flocken, president of Humane Society International, said: “Iconic species like elephants, rhinos and leopards play critical roles in their respective ecosystems, with many other species dependent on the delicate balance they provide. Sadly, these same animals are also highly coveted by trophy hunters. And as they often target the largest individuals of a species, they weaken the gene pool and can even cause collapses of small populations. In the midst of this biodiversity crisis in which over one million species face extinction, the global community must strive to protect wild animals by eschewing cruel practices like trophy hunting.”

Hundreds of luxury items were offered at the convention and for custom order including elephant skin luggage sets ranging from $10,000 to $18,000 and jewelry made from leopard claws. Both African elephants and leopards are listed under the Endangered Species Act. Exhibitors also offered lynx coats for $14,000 and purses made from zebra for $2,350. Multiple vendors displayed or offered for sale items made from imperiled species in potential violation of state law. At one booth, for example, a taxidermy company advertised its services by displaying horns from an endangered black rhino. Tennessee state law prohibits the commercial use of federally endangered species.

Among the hunting trips up for auction were a lion, leopard and plains game hunt in Zambia valued at $143,000; a hunt for a brown/grizzly bear, Dall sheep, moose, black bear and caribou in Alaska valued at $100,000; a white rhino hunt in South Africa valued at $100,000; a canned hunt for a bongo antelope in Texas valued at $41,870; and a polar bear hunt that sold for $100,000.

“Trophy hunting is an archaic and abhorrent practice that we must no longer tolerate,” said Sara Amundson, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund. “It is unthinkable that endangered and threatened species are killed just to have their parts put out on display. Congress has been urging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to look into its trophy import program for years and this convention is another reminder that the Biden administration must take a hard look at trophies coming into the U.S. so that species are not further pushed to the brink of extinction. We must continue to fight to end this egregious display of blatant disregard for the future of these imperiled species.”

Press Release

Groups challenge Trump administration over gray wolf delisting

Response to outgoing administration removing Endangered Species Act protections from the gray wolf  
 
 

Today six environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration’s rule that removed Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states except for a small population of Mexican gray wolves in Arizona and New Mexico. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made its decision despite the science that concludes wolves are still functionally extinct in the vast majority of their former range across the continental U.S.

Earthjustice filed the lawsuit on behalf of Defenders of Wildlife, Center for Biological Diversity, Sierra Club, National Parks Conservation Association, Oregon Wild and the Humane Society of the United States

“This is no ‘Mission Accomplished’ moment for wolf recovery,” said Kristen Boyles, Earthjustice attorney. “Wolves are only starting to get a toehold in places like Northern California and the Pacific Northwest, and wolves need federal protection to explore habitat in the Southern Rockies and the Northeast. This delisting decision is what happens when bad science drives bad policy.”

Nicholas Arrivo, managing attorney for the Humane Society of the United States, said, "The delisting we've challenged today represents the latest chapter in the sad saga of the Fish and Wildlife Service's failure to do its duty to protect and ensure the recovery of wolves under the Endangered Species Act. We're confident that the court will strike down this illegal decision and restore the federal protections needed to give America's wolves a genuine opportunity to recover."

“Stripping protections for gray wolves in the Lower 48—before they have fully recovered and in the middle of a wildlife extinction crisis—was based on politics, not science,” said Bonnie Rice, endangered species campaign representative at the Sierra Club. “Gray wolves are still missing from vast areas of the country. Without Endangered Species protections, wolves just starting to return to places like California and the Pacific Northwest will be extremely vulnerable. Wolves are critical to maintaining the balance of natural systems and we are committed to fighting for their full recovery.” 

“We hope this lawsuit finally sets the wolf on a path to true recovery,” said Collette Adkins, carnivore conservation director at the Center for Biological Diversity. “Restoring federal protections would allow further recovery in places like California, which is home now to just a single pack of wolves. Without federal protections, the future of gray wolves rests in the hands of state governments, many of which, like Utah and South Dakota, are hostile to wolf recovery.”

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s decision to remove Endangered Species Act protection from gray wolves in the lower-48 states threatens populations just beginning to make a comeback in national parks,” said Bart Melton, wildlife program director for the National Parks Conservation Association. “After decades of absence, gray wolves are starting to re-inhabit park landscapes in Oregon, Washington, California, and Colorado. However, these populations are far from recovered. Rather than working alongside communities to support the return of wolves, the administration unlawfully said, ‘good enough’ and removed ESA protections. We are hopeful the court will reinstate these protections.”  

“It is far too premature to declare wolves recovered and to strip protections from them in the Western two-thirds of Oregon,” said Danielle Moser, wildlife program coordinator for Oregon Wild. “Removing wolves from the endangered species list would turn their management entirely over to Oregon’s embattled Department of Fish and Wildlife, which continues to push for hunting and trapping of the state’s already fragile wolf population.” 

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared a premature victory with its reckless decision to strip gray wolves of federal ESA protections,” said Jamie Rappaport Clark, president and CEO with Defenders of Wildlife. “This decision, if it stands, will short circuit gray wolf recovery, limit the range available to wolf packs, and subject wolves to fragmented state laws, some with hostile anti-wolf policies. Defenders is challenging this decision in court and pushing the agency to reinstate needed legal protections.”

Background

Gray wolf recovery in the United States should be an American conservation success story. Once found nationwide, gray wolves were hunted, trapped, and poisoned for decades; by 1967 there were fewer than 1,000 wolves in one isolated part of the upper Midwest. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protected gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act in 1978. Today there are recovering wolf populations in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Montana and Idaho; wolves have begun to inhabit Washington, Oregon, and California; and unclaimed wolf habitat remains in states like Maine, Colorado and Utah.

Last year, 1.8 million Americans submitted comments opposing delisting. Additionally, 86 members of Congress (in both the House and Senate), 100 scientists, 230 businesses, Dr. Jane Goodall from the Jane Goodall Institute, and 367 veterinary professionals all submitted letters opposing the wolf delisting plan. Even the scientific peer reviews commissioned by the Fish and Wildlife Service itself found that the agency’s proposal ignored science and appeared to come to a predetermined conclusion, with inadequate scientific support.

Talkin' Pets News

October 31, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Suzanne Topor - Livingston Animal & Avian Hospital

Producer - Kayla Cavanaugh

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Happy Halloween please be safe and well

Talkin' Pets News

October 24, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Matt Nall - Pet Supplies Plus - Tampa Bay

Producer - Lexi Lapp Adams

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests - Monkey’s House a Dog Hospice & Sanctuary is truly Where Dogs Go To Live! Author Jeff Allen will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 10/24/20 at 5pm ET to discuss and give away his new book

Erika Lacroix, President of EZ Breathe Ventilation Systems will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 10/24/20 at 630pm ET to discuss The EZ Breathe system and why you need this system for your, home, office and clinic. EZ Breathe..the healthy, happy home people

 

The Humane Society of the United States went undercover earlier this year in New York and Maryland and last year in Oregon to document what goes on at these gruesome events that take place all around the country. The HSUS just released these statements about the Washington ban: 

 

Kitty Block, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States said:

 

“We have made it our mission to end all wildlife killing contests—gruesome events that make a game out of recklessly and indiscriminately killing animals for cash, prizes and bragging rights. These competitions that feature piles of animal carcasses are not only cruel and unsporting, but they are also at odds with science. Wild carnivores like coyotes and foxes regulate their own numbers, and the mass killing of these animals does not prevent conflicts with livestock, people or pets.”  More from Kitty Block on her blog just released. 

 

Dan Paul, Washington senior state director of the Humane Society of the United States said:

 

“Today, Washington became the seventh state in the country to ban wildlife killing contests, sending a message to the nation that the senseless killing of animals for cash and prizes does not belong in a civilized society. We applaud the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission for passing this rule, which recognizes that the vast majority of the state’s citizens will not tolerate this reprehensible practice. We urge other states to follow.”

Talkin' Pets News

April 25, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Katy Meyer

Producer - Zach Budin

Producer in Training - Kayla Cavanaugh

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests - Hour 1 - Michele Paterson Animal Wellness Action - Pennsylvania Pet Stores continue selling Dogs from Puppy Mills Despite Covid-19 Crisis

Dallas Van Kempen President of EQyss Grooming Products, Inc. will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 4/25/20 at 630pm ET to discuss and give away his shampoo

The Humane Society of the United States

Photo of Junior the beagle reuniting with his family with a play button overlay

Jon,

From living through a nightmarish, alleged neglect situation to being reunited with his loving family, Junior the beagle has had quite an extraordinary adventure.

More than a year ago, Junior was reported missing by his family. Hope was all but lost for him and his devastated family until the Humane Society of the United States found him on a property in Dixie County, Florida, during a lifesaving rescue of more than 140 dogs living in terrible conditions.

Now he's happily back with his family where he'll get all the pets, treats and love that a dog could want. Happy endings like this are only possible because of supporters like you.
Watch the Video
Photo by Morgan Rivera/The HSUS
 
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The first Nebraska mountain lion to be trophy hunted in 2020 was killed on January 2, 2020. The hunter killed the 1½ year old male just south of Chadron and posed, smiling while holding the dead animal on social media. 

Nebraska is home to an estimated 40 independent-age mountain lions (59 including kittens who are not legally trophy hunted). In 2019 and 2020 the annual quota is eight lions total. In other words, Nebraska Game and Parks allows 20% of this population to be killed by trophy hunters. The agency began allowing trophy hunting of mountain lions in 2019. 

Jocelyn Nickerson, Nebraska State Director for the Humane Society of the United States just released this statement:

 

“The Humane Society of the United States is committed to ending the unnecessary killing of mountain lions. Each year, thousands of these beautiful animals are hunted for trophies in the U.S. including in Nebraska and South Dakota where their populations are exceedingly diminishing. The loss of one mountain lion has an enormous, devastating ripple effect throughout their sensitive communities as well as their ecosystems.

Nebraska is home to a small population of these rare and iconic native animals. The trophy hunting of mountain lions is inhumane and losing just one here can be harmful to their long-term survival in our state. It can also result in greater conflicts among themselves as well as with humans, pets and livestock. These animals must be protected from trophy hunting so that they may continue to re-establish themselves in Nebraska and provide countless benefits to other wildlife and our state’s beautiful wild spaces.”

Since 2014, Senator Ernie Chambers has introduced bills to prohibit the trophy hunting of mountain lions. That year, the bill was approved by the legislature but vetoed by then Gov. Dave Heineman. Since then, Senator Chambers’ legislation has not passed committee.