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Press Release

Groups challenge Trump administration over gray wolf delisting

Response to outgoing administration removing Endangered Species Act protections from the gray wolf  
 
 

Today six environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration’s rule that removed Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states except for a small population of Mexican gray wolves in Arizona and New Mexico. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made its decision despite the science that concludes wolves are still functionally extinct in the vast majority of their former range across the continental U.S.

Earthjustice filed the lawsuit on behalf of Defenders of Wildlife, Center for Biological Diversity, Sierra Club, National Parks Conservation Association, Oregon Wild and the Humane Society of the United States

“This is no ‘Mission Accomplished’ moment for wolf recovery,” said Kristen Boyles, Earthjustice attorney. “Wolves are only starting to get a toehold in places like Northern California and the Pacific Northwest, and wolves need federal protection to explore habitat in the Southern Rockies and the Northeast. This delisting decision is what happens when bad science drives bad policy.”

Nicholas Arrivo, managing attorney for the Humane Society of the United States, said, "The delisting we've challenged today represents the latest chapter in the sad saga of the Fish and Wildlife Service's failure to do its duty to protect and ensure the recovery of wolves under the Endangered Species Act. We're confident that the court will strike down this illegal decision and restore the federal protections needed to give America's wolves a genuine opportunity to recover."

“Stripping protections for gray wolves in the Lower 48—before they have fully recovered and in the middle of a wildlife extinction crisis—was based on politics, not science,” said Bonnie Rice, endangered species campaign representative at the Sierra Club. “Gray wolves are still missing from vast areas of the country. Without Endangered Species protections, wolves just starting to return to places like California and the Pacific Northwest will be extremely vulnerable. Wolves are critical to maintaining the balance of natural systems and we are committed to fighting for their full recovery.” 

“We hope this lawsuit finally sets the wolf on a path to true recovery,” said Collette Adkins, carnivore conservation director at the Center for Biological Diversity. “Restoring federal protections would allow further recovery in places like California, which is home now to just a single pack of wolves. Without federal protections, the future of gray wolves rests in the hands of state governments, many of which, like Utah and South Dakota, are hostile to wolf recovery.”

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s decision to remove Endangered Species Act protection from gray wolves in the lower-48 states threatens populations just beginning to make a comeback in national parks,” said Bart Melton, wildlife program director for the National Parks Conservation Association. “After decades of absence, gray wolves are starting to re-inhabit park landscapes in Oregon, Washington, California, and Colorado. However, these populations are far from recovered. Rather than working alongside communities to support the return of wolves, the administration unlawfully said, ‘good enough’ and removed ESA protections. We are hopeful the court will reinstate these protections.”  

“It is far too premature to declare wolves recovered and to strip protections from them in the Western two-thirds of Oregon,” said Danielle Moser, wildlife program coordinator for Oregon Wild. “Removing wolves from the endangered species list would turn their management entirely over to Oregon’s embattled Department of Fish and Wildlife, which continues to push for hunting and trapping of the state’s already fragile wolf population.” 

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared a premature victory with its reckless decision to strip gray wolves of federal ESA protections,” said Jamie Rappaport Clark, president and CEO with Defenders of Wildlife. “This decision, if it stands, will short circuit gray wolf recovery, limit the range available to wolf packs, and subject wolves to fragmented state laws, some with hostile anti-wolf policies. Defenders is challenging this decision in court and pushing the agency to reinstate needed legal protections.”

Background

Gray wolf recovery in the United States should be an American conservation success story. Once found nationwide, gray wolves were hunted, trapped, and poisoned for decades; by 1967 there were fewer than 1,000 wolves in one isolated part of the upper Midwest. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protected gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act in 1978. Today there are recovering wolf populations in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Montana and Idaho; wolves have begun to inhabit Washington, Oregon, and California; and unclaimed wolf habitat remains in states like Maine, Colorado and Utah.

Last year, 1.8 million Americans submitted comments opposing delisting. Additionally, 86 members of Congress (in both the House and Senate), 100 scientists, 230 businesses, Dr. Jane Goodall from the Jane Goodall Institute, and 367 veterinary professionals all submitted letters opposing the wolf delisting plan. Even the scientific peer reviews commissioned by the Fish and Wildlife Service itself found that the agency’s proposal ignored science and appeared to come to a predetermined conclusion, with inadequate scientific support.

Talkin' Pets News

October 31, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Suzanne Topor - Livingston Animal & Avian Hospital

Producer - Kayla Cavanaugh

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Happy Halloween please be safe and well

Talkin' Pets News

October 24, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Matt Nall - Pet Supplies Plus - Tampa Bay

Producer - Lexi Lapp Adams

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests - Monkey’s House a Dog Hospice & Sanctuary is truly Where Dogs Go To Live! Author Jeff Allen will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 10/24/20 at 5pm ET to discuss and give away his new book

Erika Lacroix, President of EZ Breathe Ventilation Systems will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 10/24/20 at 630pm ET to discuss The EZ Breathe system and why you need this system for your, home, office and clinic. EZ Breathe..the healthy, happy home people

 

The Humane Society of the United States went undercover earlier this year in New York and Maryland and last year in Oregon to document what goes on at these gruesome events that take place all around the country. The HSUS just released these statements about the Washington ban: 

 

Kitty Block, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States said:

 

“We have made it our mission to end all wildlife killing contests—gruesome events that make a game out of recklessly and indiscriminately killing animals for cash, prizes and bragging rights. These competitions that feature piles of animal carcasses are not only cruel and unsporting, but they are also at odds with science. Wild carnivores like coyotes and foxes regulate their own numbers, and the mass killing of these animals does not prevent conflicts with livestock, people or pets.”  More from Kitty Block on her blog just released. 

 

Dan Paul, Washington senior state director of the Humane Society of the United States said:

 

“Today, Washington became the seventh state in the country to ban wildlife killing contests, sending a message to the nation that the senseless killing of animals for cash and prizes does not belong in a civilized society. We applaud the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission for passing this rule, which recognizes that the vast majority of the state’s citizens will not tolerate this reprehensible practice. We urge other states to follow.”

Talkin' Pets News

April 25, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Katy Meyer

Producer - Zach Budin

Producer in Training - Kayla Cavanaugh

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests - Hour 1 - Michele Paterson Animal Wellness Action - Pennsylvania Pet Stores continue selling Dogs from Puppy Mills Despite Covid-19 Crisis

Dallas Van Kempen President of EQyss Grooming Products, Inc. will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 4/25/20 at 630pm ET to discuss and give away his shampoo

The Humane Society of the United States

Photo of Junior the beagle reuniting with his family with a play button overlay

Jon,

From living through a nightmarish, alleged neglect situation to being reunited with his loving family, Junior the beagle has had quite an extraordinary adventure.

More than a year ago, Junior was reported missing by his family. Hope was all but lost for him and his devastated family until the Humane Society of the United States found him on a property in Dixie County, Florida, during a lifesaving rescue of more than 140 dogs living in terrible conditions.

Now he's happily back with his family where he'll get all the pets, treats and love that a dog could want. Happy endings like this are only possible because of supporters like you.
Watch the Video
Photo by Morgan Rivera/The HSUS
 
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The first Nebraska mountain lion to be trophy hunted in 2020 was killed on January 2, 2020. The hunter killed the 1½ year old male just south of Chadron and posed, smiling while holding the dead animal on social media. 

Nebraska is home to an estimated 40 independent-age mountain lions (59 including kittens who are not legally trophy hunted). In 2019 and 2020 the annual quota is eight lions total. In other words, Nebraska Game and Parks allows 20% of this population to be killed by trophy hunters. The agency began allowing trophy hunting of mountain lions in 2019. 

Jocelyn Nickerson, Nebraska State Director for the Humane Society of the United States just released this statement:

 

“The Humane Society of the United States is committed to ending the unnecessary killing of mountain lions. Each year, thousands of these beautiful animals are hunted for trophies in the U.S. including in Nebraska and South Dakota where their populations are exceedingly diminishing. The loss of one mountain lion has an enormous, devastating ripple effect throughout their sensitive communities as well as their ecosystems.

Nebraska is home to a small population of these rare and iconic native animals. The trophy hunting of mountain lions is inhumane and losing just one here can be harmful to their long-term survival in our state. It can also result in greater conflicts among themselves as well as with humans, pets and livestock. These animals must be protected from trophy hunting so that they may continue to re-establish themselves in Nebraska and provide countless benefits to other wildlife and our state’s beautiful wild spaces.”

Since 2014, Senator Ernie Chambers has introduced bills to prohibit the trophy hunting of mountain lions. That year, the bill was approved by the legislature but vetoed by then Gov. Dave Heineman. Since then, Senator Chambers’ legislation has not passed committee.

Humane Society of the United States undercover investigation shows plight of dogs in a laboratory being dosed with pesticides and drugs

There are more than 60,000 dogs used annually in experiments at hundreds of labs across the country

WASHINGTON (March 12, 2019) – Today the Humane Society of the United States revealed the results of an undercover investigation at an animal testing laboratory where thousands of dogs are killed every year. The investigation reveals the suffering and death of beagles and hounds used in toxicity tests for pesticides, drugs, dental implants and other products.

Over the span of the nearly 100 days, an investigator documented nearly two dozen short-term and long-term experiments that involved tests on dogs. The Humane Society of the United States investigator saw dogs killed at the end of studies, and others suffering for months including 36 gentle beagles being tested for a Dow AgroSciences pesticide.

Dow commissioned this laboratory to force-feed a fungicide to beagles for a year, with some dogs being subjected to very high doses – so high that up to four capsules had to be shoved down their throats.  Those who survive until the designated end date of the study in July will be killed. Dow has publicly acknowledged that this one-year test is scientifically unnecessary. The United States government eliminated this test as a requirement more than 10 years ago and nearly all countries throughout the world have followed suit through efforts that have been led by Humane Society International in cooperation with members of the industry, including Dow.

Kitty Block, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States and president of Humane Society International, said: “The disturbing findings at this facility are sadly not unique. Experiments are happening at hundreds of laboratories each year throughout the country, with more than 60,000 dogs suffering. But that does not have to be the fate for these 36 beagles. For months we have been urging Dow to end the unnecessary test and release the dogs to us. We have gone to considerable lengths to assist the company in doing so, but we simply cannot wait any longer; every single day these caged dogs are being poisoned and are one day closer to being killed. We must turn to the public to join us in urging Dow to stop the test immediately and to work with us to get these dogs into suitable homes.” 

This investigation was carried out at Charles River Laboratories in Michigan, and this is only a snapshot of what is going on in the U.S. including at for-profit companies, government facilities and universities for various testing and research purposes. The dogs are often provided by commercial breeders -- one of which, Marshall BioResources had more than 22,000 dogs at one facility in June 2018.  

Beagles are used in testing because of their docile nature, which was evident during this investigation conducted between April and August 2018. The Humane Society of the United States shared its findings with Dow and has been negotiating with the company in hopes of securing the release of the 36 dogs in their study.

Video released of the investigation shows workers carrying out experiments on dogs on behalf of three companies – Paredox Therapeutics, Above and Beyond NB LLC and Dow AgroSciences.

Among the beagles tested on, the Humane Society of the United States documented the horrible short life of one dog named Harvey who clearly sought attention by humans and was characterized by the laboratory staff as “a good boy.”

Harvey was being used to test the safety of two substances when poured into the chest cavity in a study commissioned by Paredox Therapeutics that received support from the University of Vermont. Hounds were also used when the protocol called for a larger dog breed, such as a study by Above and Beyond Therapeutics for surgical implantation of a device to pump drugs through the spinal canal. Charles River carried out tests on dogs for at least 25 companies during the time of the Humane Society of the United States investigation.  

Scientific studies have shown that more than 95 percent of drugs fail in humans, even after what appear to be promising results in animals. The Humane Society of the United States is seeking to replace dogs and other animals with more effective non-animal approaches that will better serve humans.  

“It is our obligation to tell the stories of the animals and move science, policy and corporate ethics into the 21st century,” Block added.

Talkin' Pets News

January 19, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sdlo - Celetrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media / Production - Bob Page

Special Guest - Elana Kieshenbaum, New Leaf Program Manager, will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 01/19/19 at 5pm ET to duscuss their free global Vegan mentor program

Historic “Yes on 13” Campaign Launched to End Dog Racing
Constitutional Amendment to Phase Out Greyhound Racing by 2020 Will Appear on November Ballot
TAMPA—Humane advocates will launch an historic campaign to phase out greyhound racing in Florida this morning, with a press conference at the Humane Society of Tampa Bay. State Senator Dana Young, a steadfast advocate of greyhound protection issues in the legislature, will announce the campaign along with Hillsborough County Commissioner Ken Hagan, campaign volunteers, and rescued greyhounds.
“Greyhound racing is cruel and inhumane,” said Protect Dogs – Yes on 13 Co-Chair Kate MacFall. “Thousands of dogs endure lives of confinement and substandard treatment at Florida dog tracks, and every three days a greyhound dies.”
Following the kick off, the campaign will hold thirteen grassroots meetings across the state. Protect Dogs – Yes on 13 recently launched a digital campaign to inform voters about the cruelty of greyhound racing. The campaign will communicate to voters directly via a dedicated website, Facebook page, Twitter feed and Instagram account.
“This will be a true grassroots campaign,” said Protect Dogs – Yes on 13 Co-Chair Joyce Carta. “We are confident that when Floridians see the way greyhounds suffer in this industry, they will vote Yes for the dogs.”
The campaign has chosen to make this historic announcement at the Humane Society of Tampa Bay, one of the leading animal welfare organizations in the state.
“We are proud to host this historic announcement,” said Sherry Silk, Chief Executive Officer of the Humane Society of Tampa Bay. “Dogs play such an important role in our lives, we consider them family, and they deserve to be protected.”
Serious animal welfare concerns have been documented at Florida dog tracks. Thousands of greyhounds endure lives of confinement at these facilities, kept in warehouse-style kennels in rows of stacked cages for 20 to 23 hours per day. Also, according to state records, 458 greyhound deaths have been reported at Florida dog tracks since 2013.
Commercial greyhound racing is illegal in 40 states, and two-thirds of all remaining dog tracks nationwide are in Florida.
About the Protect Dogs – Yes on 13 campaign
Protect Dogs – Yes on 13 is a grassroots campaign working to end the cruelty of greyhound racing in Florida. Protect Dogs – Yes on 13 is being sponsored by greyhound protection group GREY2K USA and the Humane Society of the United States. To learn more, go to ProtectDogs.org, or visit the campaign on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
About the Humane Society of Tampa Bay
For more than 100 years, the Humane Society of Tampa Bay has been dedicated to ending animal homelessness and providing care and comfort for companion animals in need. Named a Four-Star Charity by Charity Navigator since 2008, designated a Platinum Participator with GuideStar, recognized as a Service Enterprise by Points of Light, and accredited by AAHA, the standard in veterinary excellence, the Humane Society of Tampa Bay is dedicated to the highest standards in animal sheltering and veterinary care. Our adoption programs, affordable veterinary services, community outreach efforts and volunteer opportunities are essential to the health and wellbeing of animals across Tampa Bay. HumaneSocietyTampa.org.
PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR BY THE COMMITTEE TO PROTECT DOGS 2640 MITCHAM DRIVE, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308
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