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Undercover investigation exposes shocking, unregulated market for giraffe parts across the United States despite steep population declines

Groups petition U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect giraffes and stop the sale of giraffe bones and skins

WASHINGTON (August 23, 2018)—A shocking undercover investigation conducted by the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International found giraffe parts and products sold online and in stores by at least 51 dealers across the United States. An investigator went undercover in 21 stores in California, Florida, Maryland, North Carolina, New York, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas, as well as at the Dallas Safari Club expo where many more sellers exhibited. 

Kitty Block, acting president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States and president of Humane Society International, said, “Purchasing giraffe parts puts the entire species at risk. The giraffe is going quietly extinct. With the wild population at just under 100,000, there are now fewer than one third the number of giraffes in Africa than elephants.”

Block notes that killing giraffes for trophies, and using their parts for fashion, knife handles, home décor and trinkets not only shows a complete disregard for this iconic species, but also adds to the major threats causing the species to decline by 40 percent in the past 30 years.

“We urge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list the giraffe as endangered under the Endangered Species Act to help combat this trade and reduce population declines before it’s too late,” she said.

Giraffe parts are considered by consumers as a ‘new exotic’ popular in part as an alternative to ivory and other products for which regulations have tightened. The HSUS/HSI investigation reveals a wide variety of giraffe parts and products easily available through wholesalers and retailers in the United States, including a giraffe taxidermy ($8,000), a custom-made giraffe jacket ($5,500), a full giraffe hide ($4,500), a giraffe hide rug ($3,000), a giraffe skull ($500), a knife with a giraffe bone handle ($450), a giraffe leather Bible cover ($400), a giraffe tail hair bracelet ($10) and a giraffe foot ($75). 

Some sellers told investigators that they had received giraffe parts from trophy hunters. Several promised that new giraffe trophies were arriving soon and that they were taking custom orders for products, and others falsely claimed that giraffes were dangerous and needed to be killed to protect African villages.

On average, more than one giraffe per day is imported into the U.S. by American trophy hunters.  Giraffe are targeted so hunters can bring home exotic trophies, and the Africa hunting outfitters who arrange these hunts sell the leftover giraffe parts — skin, bones, feet, tail. The giraffe parts and products are imported into the U.S. and sold by knife makers, purveyors of wildlife curios, bootmakers and others. Increased demand in the U.S. fuels more killing of this already vulnerable species.

Background:

  • ESA listing would restrict the import, export and sale of giraffe specimens in the U.S.
  • Demand for giraffe parts can fuel poaching and trophy hunting, further decreasing giraffe populations already facing severe threats from habitat loss and civil unrest.
  • In 2016, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature elevated the threat status of giraffes from “least concern” to “vulnerable” on its Red List of Threatened Species. Among the nine subspecies, two are deemed “endangered.”
  • From 2006 to 2015, the for commercial purposes. Among these imports were about 21,000 giraffe bone carvings, nearly 4,000 raw bones, about 3,000 skin pieces, almost 2,000 raw bone pieces and more than 700 skins.
 
 
 

 

-Wildlife Groups Seek to Save Species from Silent Extinction-

WASHINGTON (April 19, 2017) — In response to recent scientific consensus on giraffes’ vulnerability to extinction, five wildlife protection groups today petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect Earth’s tallest land animal under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

The legal petition, filed by the Center for Biological Diversity, Humane Society International, The Humane Society of the United States, International Fund for Animal Welfare and Natural Resources Defense Council, seeks “endangered” status for the species. Facing mounting threats from habitat loss, being hunted for their meat, and the international trade in bone carvings and trophies, Africa’s giraffe population has plunged almost 40 percent in the past 30 years and now stands at just over 97,000 individuals.

“Giraffes have been dying off silently for decades, and we have to act quickly before they disappear forever,” said Tanya Sanerib, a senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. “There are now fewer giraffes than elephants in Africa. It’s time for the United States to step up and protect these extraordinary creatures.”

New research recently prompted the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to elevate the threat level of giraffes from ““least concern” to “vulnerable” on the “IUCN Red List of Threatened Species”. Yet giraffes have no protection under U.S. law. Species designated as “endangered” under the U.S. Endangered Species Act receive strict protections, including a ban on most imports and sales. The United States plays a major role in the giraffe trade, importing more than 21,400 bone carving, 3,000 skin pieces and 3,700 hunting trophies over the past decade. Limiting U.S. import and trade will give giraffes important protections.

“Previously, the public was largely unaware that trophy hunters were targeting these majestic animals for trophies and selfies. In the past few years, several gruesome images of trophy hunters next to slain giraffe bodies have caused outrage, bringing this senseless killing to light,” said Masha Kalinina, international trade policy specialist with the wildlife department of Humane Society International. “Currently, no U.S. or international law protects giraffes against overexploitation for trade. It is clearly time to change this. As the largest importer of trophies in the world, the role of the United States in the decline of this species is undeniable, and we must do our part to protect these animals.”

Known for their six-foot-long necks, distinctive patterning and long eyelashes, giraffes have long captured the human imagination. New research recently revealed that giraffes live in complex societies, much like elephants, and have unique physiological traits, like the highest blood pressure of any land mammal.

  

“I was lucky enough to study giraffes in the wild in Kenya many years ago.  Back then, they seemed plentiful, and we all just assumed that it would stay that way,” said Jeff Flocken, North American regional director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW). “Giraffes are facing a crisis.  We cannot let these amazing, regal and unique creatures go extinct – it would be a dramatic loss of diversity and beauty for our planet.  This listing petition is rallying the world to help save the giraffe.”

The IUCN currently recognizes one species of giraffes and nine subspecies: West African, Kordofan, Nubian, reticulated, Masai, Thornicroft’s, Rothchild’s, Angolan and South African. Today’s petition seeks an endangered listing for the whole species.

“I can’t – and won’t – imagine Africa’s landscape without giraffes,” said Elly Pepper, deputy director of NRDC’s wildlife trade initiative. “Losing one of the continent’s iconic species would be an absolute travesty. Giving giraffes Endangered Species Act protections would be a giant step in the fight to save them from extinction.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has 90 days to review and respond to the petition and determine whether a listing may be warranted.


The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 1.2 million members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

Humane Society International and its partner organizations together constitute one of the world’s largest animal protection organizations. For more than 20 25 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide – on the Web at hsi.org.

The Humane Society of the United States is the most effective animal protection organization, as rated by our peers. For more than 60 years, we have celebrated the protection of all animals and confronted all forms of cruelty. We and our affiliates are the nation’s largest provider of hands-on services for animals, caring for more than 150,000 animals each year, and we prevent cruelty to millions more through our advocacy campaigns. Read more about our more than 60 years of transformational change for animals and people. HumaneSociety.org.

Founded in 1969, IFAW rescues and protects animals around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook/IFAW and Twitter @action4ifaw.

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is an international nonprofit environmental organization with more than 2 million members and online activists. Since 1970, our lawyers, scientists, and other environmental specialists have worked to protect the world's natural resources, public health, and the environment. NRDC has offices in New York City, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Bozeman, MT, and Beijing. Visit us atwww.nrdc.org and follow us on Twitter @NRDC.

Washington, D.C. (December 21, 2016) – As the Obama Administration prepares to hand over the reins of the executive branch to President-elect Donald Trump, the Endangered Species Coalition released on Wednesday a “Top Ten” list of imperiled species in need of strong conservation measures. The report, “Removing the Walls to Recovery: Top 10 Species Priorities for a New Administration,” highlights some of the most significant threats to vanishing wildlife, including the African elephant, and identifies important actions the next administration could take to slow their rates of extinction.

The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Humane Society International (HSI) nominated the African elephant to the list. African elephant populations have declined 60 percent since 1978, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed them as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The steep decline is largely a result of habitat loss, poaching, commercial exploitation, trophy hunting, human-elephant conflict, regional conflict and instability and climate change. Between 2010 and 2012 alone, 100,000 were killed for their tusks.

IFAW and HSI have worked in concert with other wildlife groups to provide the African elephant with more protections at the international, federal and state levels, including petitioning to list them as endangered under the ESA – which resulted in a positive 90-day finding earlier this year, meaning the government believes an endangered listing may be warranted—as well as advocating for state ivory bans in New York, New Jersey, California, Washington, Oregon and Hawaii.

IFAW and HSI nominated the African elephant for the report because the species is at a tipping point,’ said Peter LaFontaine, Campaigns Manager, IFAW. “If we can build on the achievements of the past several years, we can pull it back from the brink – but if we fail to do so, we may be signing a warrant for extinction from the wild.”

Iris Ho, Wildlife Program Manager for Humane Society International, said: “The survival of the African elephant in the wild is in our hands. The responsibility to safeguard the species from poaching and wildlife trafficking is as much upon our generation as upon the United States, a global conservation leader. It's an ecological responsibility that should transcend national borders, cultures and political affiliations. We urge the incoming Trump administration and elected officials to join us in saving the last remaining African elephants.”

During the current administration, substantial progress has been made to further protect elephants by strengthening domestic U.S. ivory regulations, which set a high global standard and help prevent the United States from being a trafficking hub. This report urges the incoming administration to continue to enforce these regulations, resist congressional action to weaken these rules, work with other countries to curb trafficking and provide vital funding for USFWS, USAID and other agencies to engage in these efforts.

The remaining species featured in the Endangered Species Coalition’s report include the Jaguar, Yellow-faced Bee, Greater Sage-Grouse, Snake River Salmon, Joshua Tree, Elkhorn Coral, Bald Cypress, Vaquita and Wolves.

Endangered Species Coalition member groups nominated wildlife species for the report. A committee of distinguished scientists reviewed the nominations and decided which species should be included in the final report. The full report, along with links to photos and additional species information, can be viewed and downloaded from the website, http://removingthewallstorecovery.org.

The Endangered Species Coalition produces a “Top 10” report annually, focusing on a different theme each year. Previous years’ reports are also available on the Coalition’s website.

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About IFAW

Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About Humane Society International

Humane Society International and its partner organizations together constitute one of the world’s largest animal protection organizations. For more than 25 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide – on the Web at hsi.org.

 

HSI estimates 300 dogs killed daily in Yulin

BEIJING (4 April 2016)—With just 11 weeks to go until China’s Yulin dog meat festival, animal groups from across China gathered in Beijing to stand in solidarity with Humane Society International’s global #StopYulin campaign to end the annual event, where an estimated 10,000 dogs and countless cats are brutally slaughtered for human consumption.

HSI’s China Policy Specialist Dr Peter Li travelled to Beijing direct from Yulin, bringing new video and photographic evidence of mass dog and cat slaughter continuing to take place in the city even outside of the festival period, something the Yulin authorities have repeatedly denied.  HSI estimates that as many as 300 dogs are being killed for food every day in Yulin, with dogs being beaten to death very close to local schools within earshot of children as young as six years old.

The Capital Animal Welfare Association, VShine Animal Protection, The Ta Foundation, Hong Kong SPCA and China Animal Protection Power joined with HSI to add China’s voice to the global protest against its brutal dog meat trade. The campaigners were joined by Lian Lian, a dog rescued from a dog meat truck bound for slaughter, now adopted by a loving family in Dalian.

HSI’s Peter Li visited three dog and cat slaughterhouses where numerous animals were seen still wearing their collars, indicating that these were stolen pets. HSI witnessed animals being bludgeoned to death with metal rods in full view of their cage mates. Traumatised dogs waiting to be killed were kept in holding pens, the floor awash with blood.

Li said “This was one of the most harrowing visits I’ve ever made to Yulin. The dogs and cats I saw were visibly traumatized, their spirits broken from their terrifying ordeal. It’s hard to imagine their mental suffering, watching other dogs being killed, disemboweled and dismembered in front of them. It was like a scene from a nightmare that will haunt me forever. It shocked me to see how close these awful scenes are to local schools, with a high risk of young children being exposed to sounds and sights of extreme animal suffering. And it is apparent from the volume of dogs, and animals wearing pet collars, that Yulin remains a hub for dog and cat theft. It is astonishing that this illegal and cruel trade is tolerated, and so HSI is joining hands with our Chinese animal group partners to urge the Chinese government to crack down on the trade in time to halt the Yulin festival once and for all.”

HSI brought back video and photos from two slaughter operations in Yulin, taken between March 29 and April 2, and confirmed that dog meat is widely available in restaurants throughout the city. From interviews with dog meat traders and local residents, HSI estimates that around 300 dogs are being killed in Yulin daily, with a high likelihood that dogs and cats are being stolen to meet demand. One restaurant owner told HSI that whenever he needs dogs, he simply calls a trader and dogs are provided immediately. There is a constant supply with at least one truck every day bringing live dogs from areas outside the city and other parts of the country.  

Mm. Qin from Capital Animal Welfare Association called on the whole of China to reject the Yulin festival. Mm. Qin said: "I appeal to you, our Government, to crack down on the illegal activities involved in the dog meat trade, a cancerous act that carries so many negative connotations.  China's reputation is in great jeopardy because of this so-called 'tradition,' an eating habit that has long been discredited as something indecent and distasteful by our ancestors."

An estimated 10-20 million dogs are killed for human consumption every year in China. It is a brutal trade that involves immense animal cruelty, criminal activity and serious risk to human health, with the World Health Organisation confirming that the trade is linked to cholera and rabies. The Yulin festival takes place this year on June 21, and HSI’s team will return to shine a global spotlight on the suffering. In the meantime, they are leading the global #StopYulin campaign with an online petition at www.hsi.org/helpstopyulin which will be submitted to Chinese officials in early June.  

Up to nine million animals were affected by earthquake and aftershocks, HSI estimates

KATHMANDU (15 May 2015)—Following Tuesday’s destructive aftershock in Nepal, Humane Society International will send livestock veterinarians to care for animals in heavily affected rural areas. HSI continues to conduct an assessment of the needs of local animal welfare organizations for expansion of their facilities and will meet these needs on a case-by-case basis. HSI estimates that as many as 6 million to 9 million cows, goats and other livestock were injured or killed following the April 25 earthquake. Thousands of street dogs and cats also are in need of care.

Humane Society International’s Sarah Vallentine, who lives in Kathmandu, said: “Tuesday’s strong aftershock caused further destruction and has worsened the conditions of many people and animals already traumatized by the devastating April 25 earthquake. The initial earthquake caused animals to suffer a range of conditions from broken and crushed bones and lacerations and respiratory disease like pneumonia from days and nights exposed to the elements without shelter. We’ll continue to assist with vital supplies – humanitarian and veterinary - to provide a lifeline to both animals and people struggling to cope here in Nepal.”  

Humane Society International will continue to help animals, large and small, affected by Nepal’s earthquake and strong aftershocks:

  • HSI is working with its affiliates, the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association and Humane Society International/Australia, to deploy three veterinarians with livestock expertise to Nepal in the coming days. 
  • This week, our vets travelled to Sindhupalchok to carry out crucial vaccinations and veterinary treatments, in partnership with World Vets, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, Animal Nepal, SPCA Nepal, Himalayan Animal Rescue Team and Nepal’s Department of Livestock Services.
  • HSI is providing tarpaulins to shelter goats, cows, poultry and other animals from the harsh sun and driving monsoon rain. Many of these animals have been exposed to the elements since the earthquakes destroyed their permanent shelters, and as a result they are suffering from respiratory illnesses. Animal Welfare Network of Nepal (AWNN) will coordinate the supply of these tarps and will also assist in setting them up with the villagers in remote locations.

HSI will work  with animal groups in Nepal, including: AWNN, Society for Animal Welfare and Management, the Kathmandu Animal Treatment Center, Animal Nepal, Nepal SPCA, Himalayan Animal Rescue Team and others.

Donations are urgently needed to support our lifesaving efforts in Nepal and wherever animals and people are affected by disasters.

Animal Victims of Nepal’s Earthquake Receive Emergency Aid from Humane Society International’s Veterinary Medical Team

HSI helps dogs, cows, goats, chickens and people alike in strike zone;

(1 May 2015) – Animals injured or abandoned as a result of Nepal’s devastating earthquake are receiving emergency veterinary aid and care from Humane Society International’s Animal Rescue Team. HSI is working with our partner organisations such as Animal Welfare Network of Nepal in Kathmandu to provide life-saving veterinary medicines, vaccinations, surgical equipment and other supplies, as well as looking into providing shelter and food for sick, injured, lost and abandoned animals.

Alongside the thousands of people killed or displaced after the earthquake, thousands of animals are also struggling to cope with the aftermath. Many have sustained injuries from being trapped in collapsed buildings or hit by falling debris; thousands of animals have been crushed to death or buried alive in the disaster.

Rahul Sehgal, director of HSI Asia, said: “There is complete devastation in many areas for people and animals alike, and we’re helping both. For many people, their animals are all they have left, so HSI’s animal aid is a vital lifeline. Today the team has visited several affected areas where the surviving animals are living in stressful conditions, often exposed to the elements and in need of basic veterinary care and medicines. We are attempting to locate a facility to serve as a temporary shelter for animals who have been left behind as well as for animals in critical need as assessed by the team. We also helped a man who was singlehandedly trying to clear out the rubble of his home so that he could retrieve whatever worldly possessions he had left. Compassion doesn’t care if you have two legs or four.”

In Sengden Village a remote village outside Kathmandu where 85 per cent of the houses were levelled, people and animals are living in makeshift tents. One woman encountered by our team, Mrs Purnima Tamang, is all alone without family except for her flock of eight goats that she refuses to leave as they all shelter together in what remains of her home. “Call them what you want – my property, my family, my friends, they are all I have left,” she told HSI’s rescue team.

Her goats are suffering from exposure, having been soaked by rain for five days, and so HSI veterinarians are treating their respiratory problems and will return to help Mrs Tamang with medicine and food.

In every village HSI has visited so far, animals are getting sick from exposure in the heavy rain; many are too sick to eat, and most of the animal feed is buried in the rubble anyway. Complicating matters is that many of these villages are not easily reached as they are remote and reached only by mountainous dirt roads. It is a desperate situation, and HSI veterinarians have been the first responders on the ground to provide aid in many of these villages.

Seghal, said: “We are seeing a wide variety of animal issues here such as animals lacking shelter, food and medicines. We were able to provide treatment for some physical injuries such as cuts and lacerations, but we realize that the disaster for the surviving animals has just begun. In the absence of basic needs most of the goats are already showing signs of respiratory stress and almost all animals have diarrhoea. These signs indicate the urgent need to provide veterinary care to prevent onset of life threatening diseases. These animals have already survived a large scale disaster and it would be heart-breaking to see them succumb to something as easily preventable as respiratory diseases.. The humanitarian teams are vaccinating people and we’re working alongside them vaccinating animals. Everyone needs help here.”

We will continue to provide updates as well as photos from our animal rescue efforts in Nepal. Email the HSI media contacts to be kept informed of developments. Donations are urgently needed to support our lifesaving efforts in Nepal and wherever animals and humans are affected by disaster.

(Feb. 13, 2014)—Vietnam’s Department of Animal Health has issued a directive ordering provincial authorities to crack down on the illegal trafficking of dogs for human consumption as rabies concerns rise. The action will help put an end to the cruel and inhumane dog meat trade in this region.

The move follows a ground-breaking meeting in Hanoi last August, when members of the Asia Canine Protection Alliance met with the authorities of Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia and Laos agreed to consider a five-year moratorium on the commercial transport of dogs from one country to another. ACPA is made up of Change For Animals Foundation, Humane Society International, Animals Asia and Soi Dog Foundation.

The DAH directive specifically instructs DAH sub departments to strengthen the inspection and prevention of illegal import, transport and trade of animals or animal products. The government has also instructed the DAH to work with international organisations to raise awareness about the dangers of consuming dog meat, and the illegality of much of the cross border trade.

Tuan Bendixsen, Vietnam director for Animals Asia said:

“The dog meat trade has long been characterised by cruelty and corruption. Companion animals and strays are snatched and crammed into cages to be transported long distances. Their proximity and lack of care means diseases are rife. They are dangerous to those who choose to eat them and dangerous to anyone who comes into contact with them. Vietnam has long been the destination for trafficked dogs, from surrounding countries – if governments are serious about stopping trafficking then the corrupt and unregulated dog industry is the obvious place to start.”

Kelly O’Meara, director of companion animals and engagement with Humane Society International stated:

“This new directive is a big step in ending this cruel and illegal trade of dogs over international borders. ACPA intends to assist the Vietnam government to insure this new directive is implemented to its fullest, preventing the intense suffering of thousands of dogs and the further spread of rabies”.

Lola Webber, Programmes Leader for Change For Animals Foundation, said: “Given the dog meat trade involves the only current mass movement of known or suspected rabies-infected dogs, there is a strong argument to stop the cycle of infection by banning this trade entirely.”

While the unregulated trade of dogs into Vietnam has been illegal since 2009, limited resources have meant the law is often unenforced and has remained, until now, a low priority. It is estimated that up to 5 million dogs are slaughtered in Vietnam every year for human consumption. All countries in the region have already banned the transport of dogs without evidence of rabies vaccinations, health certificates, export licenses and proof of origin.

John Dalley, Vice President of Soi Dog Foundation, said: “The Government of Vietnam is to be applauded for taking this initiative, and we hope other countries in the region will follow this lead. Many people cite culture in defence of the trade, but rabies and cholera and other diseases associated with it are no respecters of culture.”

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations has pledged to wipe out rabies in the region by 2020. Rabies is responsible for the deaths of up to 29,000 people in Asia every year. Rabies cannot be eliminated from the region without provincial authorities stopping illegal dog trafficking.

Humane Society International and its partner organizations together constitute one of the world’s largest animal protection organizations. For more than 20 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide—on the Web at hsi.org.

(June 17, 2013) – Humane Society International CEO and President Andrew Rowan, Ph.D., sent letters urging Chinese Ambassadors to the United States, United Kingdom and Canada to work with officials in Yulin, Guangxi province, to end an inhumane annual event known as the Yulin Dog Meat Festival, where tens of thousands of dogs are bludgeoned to death in the streets for meat consumption. As outrage builds worldwide and within China against the event, Rowan sent a letter to the ambassadors on behalf of HSI supporters and members. The letters are also being sent to Yulin and Guangxi officials.

Rowan states: “Millions of animal advocates around the globe, including those in China, are protesting this inhumane, barbaric spectacle which has no place in modern society and where the butchering of tens of thousands of dogs has started and will go on for two weeks. Thousands of dogs are stuffed into and heaped on top of one another in plastic or wire crates, and are sent overland via truck on grueling, sometimes weeks-long journeys; many do not survive. Those that do survive, just barely, are then bludgeoned to death in the streets. In addition to the cruelty, this event is a public health risk because the commercial trade in dogs for meat involves the large-scale transport of dogs across international borders in Asia, and incidence of rabies has been linked to dogs in the trade. We respectfully request that the ambassadors work with Yulin officials, on behalf of all animal advocates, to end it, just as similar events elsewhere in China have been ended.”

HSI works in the region to bring about an end to the trade, where possible, and will co-host later this month the 4th Annual China Companion Animal Protection Symposium to encourage Chinese society to confront the cruelty of the trade in dogs and cats for meat consumption. At least 10 million dogs are believed to be killed for consumption of their meat in China annually, predominantly in South China and Northeast China. Last year, a dog meat festival in Jinhua City, Zhejing province ended after opposition from Chinese animal groups.

Humane Society International and its partner organizations together constitute one of the world's largest animal protection organizations. For nearly 20 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands-on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide — on the Web at hsi.org.