Thursday, 04 June 2020 19:36

Robin Bennett, Co-Founder of The Dog Gurus and author of several books will join Jon & Talkin' Pets 6/06/20 at 630pm ET to discuss dog day cares & business's as they plan to reopen during Covid-19 Featured

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Robin from the Dog Gurus



They are really focusing on helping facilities get back to normal while still maintain safety measures to keep the people safe and reduce fear.


Facilities need to be proactive rather than reactive.
The dog gurus provided three steps

1. Begin a wait list for routine services NOW.  That way they have a list to use to get clients and achieve as high an occopancy as possible. Someone needs to work this list continually. This will be especially important for grooming, daycare, training, petsitting

2. Create special activities to celebrate a return to “new normal”. Put together several “ready to go” activities that you can roll out as soon as openings are announced.  These will help generate enrollment/signups for daycare and training to celebrate.  Use scarcity to promote these and maximize attendance. Give people a reason to return. 

3. Create special one time events to encourage lodging. This will be the last service to come back fully so create reasons for people to bring their dog in for overnight stays. For example: date weekends to celebrate (partner with local stores who can provide gift certificates as part of the package), movie nights for the dogs, sleep overs, etc.  Encourage owners to get their dogs back in the routine of staying overnight to prep for the holidays. 

Keep in mind that she people may still be nervous about going out so continue to maintain safety protocols.

Robin Bennett, CPDT-KA
Robin Bennett is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer, author, speaker, and expert on dogs. She founded one of the largest dog training companies in Virginia and has been using her expertise in “reading dogs” to teach families how to train their pets as well as helping others in the pet care industry keep dogs safe for over 20 years. Robin’s first book, All About Dog Daycare is the number one reference on opening a dog daycare. She is also Co-author of Off-Leash Dog Play… A Complete Guide to Safety and Fun, and an extensive staff training program called, Knowing Dogs, which are the leading staff training resources for dog daycare and boarding facilities. Robin is currently co-founder of The Dog Gurus, the nation’s premier resource for dog care professionals. Through The Dog Gurus she is now helping pet care professionals get their lives back by showing them how to create sustainable businesses with teams that truly know dogs.

Here’s her two books:
All about daycare 
Off Leash Dog Play: A Complete Guide to Safety and Fun 



Robin Bennett, CPDT-KA
Robin Bennett is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer, author, speaker, and expert on dogs. She founded one of the largest dog training companies in Virginia and has been using her expertise in “reading dogs” to teach families how to train their pets as well as helping others in the pet care industry keep dogs safe for over 20 years. Robin’s first book, All About Dog Daycare is the number one reference on opening a dog daycare. She is also Co-author of Off-Leash Dog Play… A Complete Guide to Safety and Fun, and an extensive staff training program called, Knowing Dogs, which are the leading staff training resources for dog daycare and boarding facilities. Robin is currently co-founder of The Dog Gurus, the nation’s premier resource for dog care professionals. Through The Dog Gurus she is now helping pet care professionals get their lives back by showing them how to create sustainable businesses with teams that truly know dogs.

Susan Briggs, MA, CPACO
Susan Briggs is a Certified Professional Animal Care Operator, author, speaker, and pet care business expert. As co-founder of The Dog Gurus she brings over 18 years of experience in the pet industry with 12 years as co-owner and operator of a successful dog daycare, lodging, grooming and training business in Houston, Texas. In addition to being a co-author with Robin in publishing Off-Leash Dog Play and Knowing Dogs, Susan used her educational background in accounting and published Counting Noses: Accounting and Financial Management Guidelines for the Pet Services Industry. Susan enjoys making it easy for owners to understand the numbers side of their business so they can focus on care quality. In 2015 Susan co-founded the Professional Animal Care Certification Council whose mission is to provide independent testing and certification for pet care professionals. The program embraces Susan’s passion for providing quality care for animals.


Four Things Every Dog Should Know

Robin Bennett, CPDT-KA

Co-Founder, The Dog Gurus

www.TheDogGurus.com

Dogs are brilliant! And they love to learn. There is no end to things you can teach your dog. Dog training ranges from teaching basic manners, such as sit, to teaching tricks such as shake or play dead, to teaching sports and activities such as agility or scent work. Regardless of whether your dog is a stay at home pooch or a social pup who participates in a wide range of outdoor activities, here are four things every dog should know.

• His name – With this behavior, you say your dog’s name and he turns and looks at you. Ultimately, this ends up becoming the come command, but for starters I want a dog that will stop what he is doing at least long enough to look at me whenever I say his name. Teaching a strong response to his name is the first step toward managing your dog. If your dog doesn’t pay attention to you, no other cues matter. Teaching a dog his name means teaching him when and how to pay attention to you.
• Sit – You can stop all types of bad behaviors by teaching a dog to sit. Just remember to reinforce it and practice it in lots of new locations.
o Does your dog jump? Ask him to sit instead.
o Is your dog scratching at the door to go outside? Ask him to sit instead.
o Are you trying to write a check at the vet’s office but your dog is pulling on the leash? Ask him to sit instead.
• Wait – I teach wait to mean “do whatever you want, butstay where you are.” You can use wait for some of the following situations:
o When you open the crate door but need your dog to wait while you put on his leash.
o When you are getting groceries from the house and want your dog to say in the foyer even if the door is open.
o When you are making the bed and don’t want your dog to get on it until the covers are straightened out (I personally have this situation every morning!)
• Drop it –This is a great behavior for when your dog picks up something that you don’t want him to have. It’s also a fun way for the two of you to play tug of war.

There are lots of other things you can teach your dog, but these are the bare minimum behaviors you should focus on to have basic dog manners around the house.

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