Displaying items by tag: awards

RALEIGH, NC (December 17, 2021) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the health of all dogs and their owners, recognizes leaders in canine health with their annual awards.

  • Dr. A. Duane and Connie Butherus receive the 2021 President’s Award.

  • 2021 Distinguished Research Partners are the Australian Shepherd Health and Genetics Institute, Inc. and Retriever News/Entry Express.

The President's Award is given to a person or organization that has made an exceptional contribution to advancing canine health. Duane and Connie Butherus have devoted more than 50 years to dogs. From showing prize-winning Afghan Hounds to serving as officers for many clubs, they are dedicated to advancing the health and well-being of dogs. Duane is currently on CHF’s Board of Directors and served as Chairman of the Board from 2013 to 2015. He is also currently a member of CHF’s Scientific Review Committee. Connie is the past president of the Afghan Hound Club of America, Afghan Hound Club of Northern New Jersey, and Central New Jersey Hound Association. In addition, she is a current member of the Kennel Club of Philadelphia, Morris & Essex Kennel Club, Tuxedo Park Kennel Club, and Delaware Gap Kennel Club.

The Distinguished Research Partner Award is given annually to clubs or organizations for their ongoing and outstanding commitment to support canine health research. The Australian Shepherd Health and Genetics Institute, Inc. (ASHGI) has been a valued supporter of canine health research funded through CHF since 2009, supporting studies that directly impact canine health and breeding strategies. Their constant and enthusiastic attendance at the National Parent Club Canine Health Conference furthers the missions of ASHGI and CHF to benefit the health of all dogs. Retriever News provides vital outreach through magazine ads and content. They support research through direct donations and provide handlers the unique opportunity to support CHF through the Entry Express retriever event management system.

“This year’s award recipients have provided long-term and steadfast support for CHF and its mission,” says CHF Board Chairman, J. Charles Garvin, MD, FACS. “We are honored to apply their knowledge and passion to advance the health of all dogs.”

In 2021, CHF invested more than $3.4 million in 50 new canine health research and educational grants. These grants augment the Foundation’s portfolio of 154 active and international canine health studies addressing a variety of conditions from glaucoma to pancreatitis to cancer and more.

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About the AKC Canine Health Foundation

Since 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science to address the health needs of all dogs. With more than $63.5 million in funding to date, the Foundation provides grants for the highest quality canine health research and shares information on the discoveries that help prevent, treat and cure canine diseases. The Foundation meets and exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, as demonstrated by their highest four-star Charity Navigator rating and GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency. Learn more at www.akcchf.org.

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Dear Jon,

We have a bright spot to share with you, amid all the unusual occurrences in our lives right now. Of course, we had to cancel the celebration of Doris's life in Los Angeles originally scheduled for this week. But as a special treat for all of Doris' fans and friends, we wanted to present this fantastic and fun retrospective video, containing some rare Doris footage, comic bloopers, backstage sneak-peeks, and even some four-leggers! We thought it was a fitting tribute on what would have been Doris' 98th birthday today.

Special thanks to DDAF friends Jim Pierson, for his curation and editing skills, and Noopy Rodriguez and the Rose Marie Estate for the home footage.

Enjoy the show, everybody, and take good care out there!

 
 
 

 

RALEIGH, NC (February 27, 2020) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the health of all dogs and their owners, has recently awarded over $2.1 million in 36 new canine health research grants.

Celebrating their 25th anniversary in 2020, the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) awards grants for research projects that meet the highest scientific standards and have the greatest potential to advance the health of all dogs. In this latest round of grants, promising studies in many areas of canine health research, including canine oncology and neurology, are now possible. These new grants address important cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, including for canine lymphoma, osteosarcoma, bladder cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma. CHF is responsive to donors, dog owners, breeders, and the veterinary community in focusing on areas of greatest need for canine health, including studies with One Health implications to benefit both dogs and humans.

Highlights from the new canine health research grants include:

Grant 02772: Identifying Early Stage Ultra-rare Mutations as Predictive Biomarkers of Lymphoma in High-risk versus Low-risk Breeds Within the Dog Aging Project
Principal Investigator: Daniel Promislow, PhD; University of Washington
Canine lymphoma risk associated with variation in the frequency and type of rare precancerous mutations will be evaluated in this large cohort study. This work is part of the Dog Aging Project, a groundbreaking study seeking to understand how genes, lifestyle, and environment influence aging.

Grant 02773: Histotripsy for Treatment of Canine Appendicular Osteosarcoma
Principal Investigator: Joanne Tuohy, DVM; Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine
A precision non-thermal focused ultrasound method that mechanically breaks down tissues and can potentially activate the immune system against osteosarcoma will be studied as an alternative treatment for primary and metastatic osteosarcoma in dogs.

Grant 02732-A:  Tumor-educated Platelets: A Minimally Invasive Liquid Biopsy for Early Cancer Diagnosis
Principal Investigator: Unity Jeffery, VetMB, PhD; Texas A&M AgriLife Research
A study of platelet RNA profiles as a first step in developing a blood-based screening test or liquid biopsy for canine cancer.

Grant 02802: Clinical Trial of Prevotella histicola Supplementation to Ameliorate Meningoencephalomyelitis of Unknown Origin (MUO)
Principal Investigator: Nick Jeffery, BVSc, PhD; Texas A&M University
A study of the important relationship between the canine gut, its microbiome, and the brain to test a new treatment for this devastating immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system of dogs which resembles multiple sclerosis in humans.

02800:  Defining the Effect of Genotype, Breed and Age on the Risk of Developing Canine Degenerative Myelopathy and Investigating the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying That Risk
Principal Investigators: Gary Johnson, DVM, PhD and Joan Coates, DVM, MS; University of Missouri
Defining the risk of developing degenerative myelopathy in genetically at-risk dogs will inform breeding decisions while exploring the molecular mechanisms responsible for disease onset will aid in disease management.

“These recent cancer and neurological disease grants for research demonstrate innovative approaches to understanding the genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors that influence disease,” states CHF Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Diane Brown. “Along with our recently awarded grants to study gastrointestinal disease, toxicology, immunology, and more, CHF leads the way to new and compelling canine health research that will make possible diagnostic and treatment breakthroughs benefitting all dogs and their owners.”

With these research grants, CHF has now surpassed a milestone of 1,000 research and educational grants awarded since they were founded by the American Kennel Club in 1995. CHF independently manages $11.1 million in 153 active canine health research grants, available to view in their Research Grants Portfolio at akcchf.org/researchportfolio. Requests for proposals on reproductive conditions, dental disease, tick-borne disease, and more are scheduled throughout 2020. View CHF’s latest canine health research grants awarded in 2020 at www.akcchf.org/research/research-portfolio/program-area/2020_Awarded_Grants.html.

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About CHF

Since 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science to address the health needs of all dogs. With more than $56 million in funding to date, the Foundation provides grants for the highest quality canine health research and shares information on the discoveries that help prevent, treat and cure canine diseases. The Foundation meets and exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, as demonstrated by their highest four-star Charity Navigator rating and GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency. Learn more at www.akcchf.org.

PIERCE BROSNAN TO HOST 7TH ANNUAL 
“BREAKTHROUGH PRIZE” CEREMONY ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4 
LIVE ON NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
 
The Annual, Star-Studded Ceremony that Celebrates
Science and Scientific Achievement 

To Feature an “In Memoriam” Tribute to the Late Stephen Hawking
 
Ceremony to Air Live at 10p ET/7p PT 

 
SAN FRANCISCO– October 16, 2018–The Breakthrough Prize today announced that acclaimed actor, producer and philanthropist Pierce Brosnan will host its 7thannual ceremony, which will celebrate science and the achievements of the 2019 Breakthrough Prize laureates on Sunday, November 4, at a live ceremony at the NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley. 
 
The ceremony will be broadcast live at 10pm ET/7pm PT on National Geographic, and be streamed live on the Facebook and YouTube platforms of National Geographic (FacebookYouTube) and Breakthrough Prize (FacebookYouTube).
 
Hosted by Brosnan, the program will include a tribute to the late, renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, who died in March 2018. 
 
Details of the evening’s musical performance and celebrity presenters will be announced at a later date. The show will be directed and produced, for the sixth time, by Don Mischer, alongside executive producers Charlie Haykel and Juliane Hare of Don Mischer Productions.
 
Now in its seventh year, Silicon Valley’s Breakthrough Prize – the world’s most generous science prize – honors paradigm-shifting research and discovery in the fields of fundamental physics, life sciences and mathematics. This year, a total of seven $3 million prizes will be awarded – four in life sciences, two in fundamental physics, and one in mathematics. One of the two physics prizes - the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics – was awarded in September to the British astrophysicist Jocelyn Bell Burnell for her discovery of pulsars – a detection first announced in February 1968 – and her inspiring scientific leadership over the last five decades. 
 
The Breakthrough Prizes are sponsored by Sergey Brin, Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg, Ma Huateng, Yuri and Julia Milner, and Anne Wojcicki. Selection Committees composed of previous Breakthrough Prize laureates in each field choose the winners.
 
Breakthrough Prize
For the seventh year, the Breakthrough Prizes will recognize the world’s top scientists. Each prize is $3 million and presented in the fields of Life Sciences (up to four per year), Fundamental Physics (one per year) and Mathematics (one per year). In addition, up to three New Horizons in Physics and up to three New Horizons in Mathematics Prizes are given out to junior researchers each year. Laureates attend a live televised award ceremony designed to celebrate their achievements and inspire the next generation of scientists. As part of the ceremony schedule, they also engage in a program of lectures and discussions. 
 
Information on the Breakthrough Prizes is available at www.breakthroughprize.org.
 
About National Geographic
National Geographic Partners LLC (NGP), a joint venture between National Geographic and 21st Century Fox, is committed to bringing the world premium science, adventure and exploration content across an unrivaled portfolio of media assets. NGP combines the global National Geographic television channels (National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo MUNDO, Nat Geo PEOPLE) with National Geographic’s media and consumer-oriented assets, including National Geographic magazines; National Geographic studios; related digital and social media platforms; books; maps; children’s media; and ancillary activities that include travel, global experiences and events, archival sales, licensing and e-commerce businesses. Furthering knowledge and understanding of our world has been the core purpose of National Geographic for 130 years, and now we are committed to going deeper, pushing boundaries, going further for our consumers … and reaching millions of people around the world in 172 countries and 43 languages every month as we do it. NGP returns 27 percent of our proceeds to the nonprofit National Geographic Society to fund work in the areas of science, exploration, conservation and education. For more information visit natgeotv.com or nationalgeographic.com, or find us on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTubeLinkedIn and Pinterest.
 
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Increasing the survival rate of frosted flatwood salamander larvae in Florida, protecting longleaf pine habitat for federally listed species like the gopher tortoise and eastern indigo snake, and spearheading Operation Herpsaspetz, to uncover an illegal scheme to capture, sell, and transport 750 North American Wood turtles worth nearly $345,000.  

These are just a few of the many conservation efforts for which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Southeast Region honored its partners and employees Regional Director’s Honor Awards marking extraordinary conservation accomplishments in 2015 and 2016.

“Many people and organizations have worked diligently behind the scenes to help conserve the Southeast Region’s fish, wildlife and plant diversity and the variety of habitats they depend upon,” said Cindy Dohner, the Service’s Southeast Regional Director.  “We commend their efforts and thank them.”

The following individuals and organizations received awards:

Alabama:

International Crane Foundation: Dr. Richard Beilfuss, President and Chief Executive Officer; Dr. Erica Cochrane, Conservation Measures Manager; Lizzie Condon, Whooping Crane Outreach Coordinator; Dr. Julie Langenberg, Vice President, Conservation Science, Baraboo, Wisconsin:  The International Crane Foundation (ICF) spearheaded a “Keeping Whooping Cranes Safe” campaign focused on reducing human-induced mortality of these highly endangered birds. This campaign was piloted in Alabama, an important wintering area for whooping cranes in the eastern migratory population. Through partnerships with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, state, and non-government organizations, the ICF has produced radio and television public service announcements, billboards, workshops for kindergarten through high school teachers, outreach events, and even a whooping crane mascot to raise public awareness to the plight of these birds and the need to actively work for their recovery. ICF has been a key partner in expanding participation in the annual Festival of the Cranes held at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama for more than 3,000 attendees.

Florida:

Nick Wiley, Executive Director, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Tallahassee:  Nick Wiley also is 2016-2017 President of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.  He is a recognized leader-among-leaders in conservation across the nation.  Nick chaired the Federal-State Joint Task Force on Endangered Species Act (ESA) Policy, which recommended ways to strengthen the partnership between federal agencies and states in implementing the ESA. He led the development of a new kind of ESA Section 6 Agreement that allows the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and FWC to avoid duplication in ESA permitting, and the FWC Imperiled Species Program, which gives the State of Florida a stronger authority for protecting species, thus preventing the need for them to be federally listed.   Nick provided several million dollars to the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee NWR to help control invasive exotic plants, such as melaleuca and lygodium, and invasive animals, including pythons and snakehead fish, all of which pose significant threats to migratory birds, listed and at-risk species, and other native wildlife. Nick also has partnered closely with the Service on NWRS land protection and managing of hunt programs, working towards common sense solutions on an array of controversial issues.

Alto “Bud” Adams Jr., Landowner of Adams Ranch, Inc., Fort Pierce:  Bud Adams’ cattle ranch has been actively operating for 76 years and is the 12th largest cow-calf ranch in the country. Bud’s influence and support as a leader in the ranching community were critical in the creation of the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge. To date, Bud has placed 663 acres in conservation easements as part of the refuge; 2,330 acres in the Florida Rural and Family Lands program; and he is working with the State of Florida on several thousand additional acres in easements. These lands will continue to conserve and protect important natural resources in South Florida in perpetuity.

Julie Morris, Florida and Gulf Coast Programs Manager, National Wildlife Refuge Association, Nocomis:  Julie Morris has been instrumental in establishing, building and maintaining high-trust relationships with stakeholders throughout the Everglades Headwaters landscape. She has brought together federal and state agency representatives, ranchers, sports men and women, and non-government organizations in a cooperative approach across key landscapes to protect valuable natural resources, connect wildlife corridors, and keep working lands working. Julie’s collaborative spirit has fostered a partnership approach that has added 30,000 acres in conservation easements to the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area since its establishment in 2012.

Dr. Frank Mazzotti, Professor, University of Florida, Davie: The Burmese python, Nile monitor lizard, and veiled chameleon are among the invasive species that are a threat to the South Florida landscape and to the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Dr. Mazzotti is an expert on invasive reptiles and a key player in efforts to prevent their introduction and to control their spread in South Florida. He is a leader in working extensively with local, state and federal agencies and private sector organizations and individuals to actively respond to this serious threat.

Julie Scardina, Corporate Director Animal Ambassador Programs SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment, Orlando:  Under the direction of Julie Scardina, SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment turned the Migratory Bird Treaty Centennial into an environmental educational opportunity through in-park special events and social media outreach that engaged more than half a million people. SeaWorld’s communications gave people an understanding of the serious challenges migratory birds face and how we all benefit when birds thrive.  SeaWorld also has been an invaluable partner in the Service’s manatee conservation efforts rescuing 32 manatees and releasing 23 manatees in 2016.

St. Marks Frosted Flatwoods Salamander Research Team: Wildlife Biologist William Barichivich, Wildlife Biologist Katherine O’Donnell, Wildlife Biologist Susan Walls, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center U.S. Geological Survey, Gainesville: When surveys revealed a precipitous decline in frosted flatwoods salamanders on St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and across the species’ range, staff from the refuge and the U.S. Geological Survey took action with other partners and experts through a structured decision making workshop to address the needs of the salamander. William Barichivich, Katherine O’Donnell, and Susan Walls were instrumental in inventorying and monitoring population levels and developing a successful larval headstart program. The methods developed for this program have increased the survival rate of larvae.  The Team has worked successfully with partners and experts from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Panama City Ecological Services Field Office, the Apalachicola National Forest, The Nature Conservancy, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and Eglin Air Force Base to implement management techniques to conserve this species.

Florida Department of Transportation State Environmental Office: Marjorie Kirby, Administrator of State Environmental Programs; Xavier Pagan, Administrator of State Environmental Process, Tallahassee: Marjorie Kirby and Xavier Pagan have championed funding and support for two additional U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff members to work with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) on programmatic consultations and streamlining solutions for routine transportation projects, for projects and research to develop new approaches for protecting species and habitat, and for bold and innovative ideas to address species concerns and mitigation issues. They regularly coordinate at a statewide level with staff from the Service and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to ensure that species considerations are appropriately addressed and considered in project design allowing for enhanced species benefits and compatibility with road projects. Examples include the work they did with their District 1 FDOT staff on negotiating and installing State Road 80 underpasses and fencing to facilitate panthers and bears crossing under the widened sections of road, and funding/staff support for research on Perdido Key beach mouse crossings that will be considered in a multi-state bridge project. Both Majorie and Xavier were key participants in the GreenLinks project, a shared vision of landscape-level conservation priorities among partners in transportation planning in northwest Florida.

Georgia:

Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division: Dr. Jon Ambrose, Chief of Non-game Conservation, Social Circle; Matt Elliott, Program Manager of Non-game Conservation, Social Circle;  Steve Friedman, Chief Real Estate, Atlanta; Jason Lee, Program Manager Non-game Conservation, Brunswick; Brent Womack, Wildlife Biologist Game Management, Armuchee: The Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division has taken the lead on working with partners to establish new and expanded conservation lands at strategic locations across Georgia. As a result of the Division’s capability in partnering, planning, and application of best available science, thousands of acres that benefit federally-listed and at-risk species have been added to state-owned public lands. Examples include the expansion of the Paulding/Sheffield Forest Wildlife Management Area (WMA) to more than 15,000 acres providing open pine woodland for a variety of species and protecting the headwaters of the Etowah River, which is critical habitat for the endangered Etowah Darter and other listed pecies; significant efforts to expand the Lower Altamaha River conservation corridor creating greater connectivity with conservation lands from Georgia’s coast to the Okefenokee swamp and Fort Stewart, as well as, providing habitat for migratory birds, many listed and at-risk species, such as the southern hognose snake and Florida pine snake, and spawning areas for native fisheries; and the establishment of the Alapaha WMA that includes the state’s largest concentration of gopher tortoises.

Susan Meyers, Monarchs Across Georgia, Lilburn: Georgia Susan Meyers is a leader in conserving monarch butterflies and other pollinators through her hands-on work in schools and communities across the State of Georgia. She supported the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the expansion of the Rosalyn Carter Butterfly Trail, oversaw the funding and creation of 20 new monarch habitats in schools and community gardens, and led an effort that put native pollinator gardens in 50 state parks. She has taught 150 teachers the basics of monarch conservation and reached 50,000 students, parents and community members through her workshops and outreach events. Susan also was instrumental in connecting the Service with numerous other partners working to create, connect and conserve landscapes for monarchs and pollinators.

Reese Thompson, Landowner, Vidalia:  Reese Thompson has been a major contributor to the restoration of longleaf pine in the Southeast by the way he has managed his own lands and the model he has provided for other landowners. Reese has restored thousands of acres on his own land and been a champion for management of at-risk and listed species, such as the gopher tortoise and eastern indigo snake, demonstrating through actions that species can be conserved on working forests. Reese is a leader among private landowners, working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, the Longleaf Alliance, the Orianne Society, and Partners for Conservation to not only improve management on his property, but also to host field days to educate others and to advocate publicly for ecological restoration and public-private partnerships. Reese works closely with adjacent landowners to keep the larger forested landscape as forest. His knowledge and insight helped the Service and the Natural Resources Conservation Service adapt conservation measures that are practical for landowners to implement under the Gopher Tortoise Working Lands for Wildlife Initiative.

Dan Forster, Director Government Relations, Archery Trade Association New Ulm, Minnesota:  As the past director of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division and past president of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Dan Forster has long been a guiding force in southeastern species and habitat conservation. Dan played a key role in land acquisitions for many listed species, including the indigo snake, red-cockaded woodpecker, and Etowah darter and at-risk species, including the gopher tortoise, gopher frog, and Florida pine snake, leveraging funds from multiple partners including the Department of Defense, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, industry, foundations, and private landowners to focus on shared conservation goals. Conservation along the Altamaha River is a great example of Dan’s leadership in restoring habitat connectivity and providing large corridors of habitat for various species. The Altamaha is the last major undammed river in Georgia that provides natural flood regimes and through Dan’s leadership over 100,000 acres of habitat along the lower Altamaha River has been conserved.

Louisiana

Louisiana Turtle Smuggling Investigative Team: Scotty Boudreaux, Special Agent U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Lacombe; Brian Cazalot, Postal Inspector U.S. Postal Inspection Service New Orleans; David Haller, Assistant U.S. Attorney U.S. Attorney’s Office New Orleans; Greg Kennedy, Assistant U.S. Attorney U.S. Attorney’s Office New Orleans; Brian Lomonaco, Special Agent Department of Homeland Security, New Orleans:  Working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Office of Law Enforcement, this team of investigators is recognized for their unparalleled dedication to the international fight against wildlife trafficking and smuggling. Through Operation Herpsaspetz, they identified and dismantled an unlawful scheme in which some 750 North American Wood turtles worth nearly $345,000 were illegally captured, sold and transported over a three-year period from Pennsylvania through Louisiana and California to a final destination in Hong Kong. The investigation led to the arrest and prosecution of American and international suspects for violations of the Lacey Act, and Endangered Species Act, smuggling, money laundering, using fictitious names and addresses, and conspiracy violations. So far, the prosecution phase has yielded six and a half years of incarceration, 25 years of probation, and $51,000 in fines and restitution, in addition to monetary seizures of $134,000.

North Carolina:

Jeff Fisher, Chief Executive Officer Unique Places, LLC Durham; Tim Sweeney, Principal/Manager 130 of Chatham, LLC, Cary: A strong partnership between Tim Sweeney, Jeff Fisher, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has led to significant contributions to the conservation of rare plants and other native fish and wildlife species in the Box Creek Wilderness National Heritage Area in North Carolina. Tim, with Jeff ’s assistance, has donated 6,000 acres of conservation easements to the Service, with another 1,000 acres underway, to permanently protect southern Appalachian mountain bog habitats, advance the conservation of at-risk species, and contribute to wildlife corridor connectivity with other protected lands in the state. Tim has also purchased 175 acres of endangered Virginia big-eared bat habitat, permanently protecting a significant maternity colony.

Tennessee:

Ed Carter, Executive Director Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency Nashville: As Executive Director of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Ed Carter has set the bar for his visionary leadership and invaluable contributions in support of the Southeast Conservation Adaptation Strategy (SECAS). In recognizing the existing and projected massive landscape changes reshaping the Southeast’s aquatic and terrestrial habitats, Ed introduced a compelling vision whereby state fish and wildlife agencies engage partners in defining a conservation landscape of the future that sustains fish and wildlife. Ed led efforts to receive commitment and support from the 15 State Directors of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (SEAFWA), and the 12 federal agency leaders of the Southeast Natural Resource Leaders Group. His leadership also provided direction and support to the conservation science staff of six Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, the Southeast Climate Science Center, and the Southeast Aquatic Resource Partnership to achieve many significant accomplishments over the past five years. This enormous undertaking culminated in a SECAS Conservation Leadership summit convened at the 2016 SEAFWA Conference where state and federal leaders gathered to witness the amazing progress that has been made. Under Ed’s direction, the Leadership Summit participants helped to chart the course for the next five years.

Brett Dunlap, State Director U.S. Department of Agriculture, APHIS Wildlife Services Madison: Brett Dunlap was instrumental in developing a new program in Kentucky and Tennessee to meet stakeholder needs around livestock depredation while fulfilling Migratory Bird Treaty Act responsibilities for black vultures. Brett worked with the Farm Bureau, the livestock industry, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to craft a first-in-the-nation program that is being used as a model. It permits “take” of these migratory birds with authorization granted through the Farm Bureau, while at the same time establishes a process for consideration of non-lethal methods to resolve the problem. Brett played a major role in working with the livestock industry and various organizations that represent livestock producers to provide public awareness of the benefits of black vultures, as well as the non-lethal tools that could help the producers and minimize the need to take birds. To date, the program has helped more than 250 farmers and has resulted in a greater exchange of information.

Conservation Fisheries, Inc.: Pat Rakes, Co-Director, J. R. Shute, Co-Director, Knoxville: For more than two decades, Conservation Fisheries, Inc. (CFI) has dedicated itself to the preservation of aquatic diversity, providing critical data and technical assistance to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others for the protection and recovery of listed and imperiled fish species throughout the Southeast Region. CFI has worked with more than 60 species, developed propagation protocols, created and maintained “ark” populations of those most critically endangered fish, and reintroduced propagated animals back into their native habitats. Their work has led the way in helping populations of several imperiled species, such as the yellowfin madtom, smoky madtom and Citico darter and also helped focus restoration efforts in areas that benefit multiple species.

Gulf States:

Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Case Team: Dan Audet, Project Manager, National Park Service, Seattle, Washington; John Carlucci, Assistant Solicitor, Office of the Solicitor, Department of the Interior, Washington, DC., Kevin Chapman, Compliance Coordinator, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Atlanta; Colette Charbonneau, Chief of Staff, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia; Clare Cragan, Attorney-Advisor,Office of the Solicitor, Department of the Interior, Lakewood, Colorado; Charman Cupit, Budget Analyst, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Jackson, Mississippi; Holly Deal, Attorney-Advisor, Office of the Solicitor, Department of the Interior Atlanta; Georgia; Benjamin Frater, Restoration Specialist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fairhope, Alabama; James Haas, Chief Resource Protection Branch, National Park Service, Fort Collins, Colorado; Jon Hemming, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fairhope, Alabama;  Amy Mathis, Natural Resource Planner, U.S. Forest Service, Prairie City, Oregon; Debora McClain, Deputy Case Manager, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Denver, Colorado; Ronald McCormick, Ecologist Bureau of Land Management, Washington, D.C.; Ashley Mills, Fish and Wildlife Biologist ,U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Atlanta, Georgia; Mark Van Mouwerik, Restoration Project Manager, National Park Service, Fort Collins, Colorado; Nanciann Regalado, Public Affairs Specialist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Atlanta, Georgia; Robin Renn, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fairhope, Alabama; Kevin Reynolds, Case Manager, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Atlanta, Georgia; John Rudolph, Attorney-Advisor, Office of the Solicitor, Department of the Interior Washington, D.C.; Pam Rule, Program Analyst, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Knoxville, Tennessee; Gregory Steyer, Ecologist, U.S. Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Amy Wisco, Program Analyst, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Lakewood, Colorado:  The Department of the Interior’s Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Case Team - composed of representatives of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Office of the Solicitor - achieved extraordinary success in conservation following the catastrophic 2010 oil spill - the largest marine spill in U.S. history. Working together with state and federal partners on the Deepwater Horizon Trustee Council, this team helped lead the assessment of injuries to natural resources such as birds, fish, sea turtles and federally-managed lands while simultaneously creating and implementing a multi-faceted restoration program for the Gulf of Mexico. This collaborative approach across multiple bureaus within the Department of the Interior was extremely effective and efficient in providing clear, consistent and timely decisions and information and is considered a model for the Department’s engagement in future spills and other complex environmental challenges. This team’s efforts, from the completion of five Early Restoration Plans, which green-lighted $868 million dollars for restoration projects, to the completion of the Trustee’s Programmatic Damage Assessment and Restoration Plan and Environmental Impact Statement, were pivotal in helping the United States and the five Gulf States reach the $20.8 billion global settlement with BP - the largest civil settlement in the history of the United States.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who can make it happen, visitfws.gov. Connect with the Service onFacebook, follow ourtweets, watch theYouTube Channeland download photos fromFlickr.

 

New York, NY The American Kennel Club (AKC®), the world’s largest purebred dog registry and leading advocate for dogs, is honored to announce the first set of 2017 AKC Paw of Courage awards to recognize the working canines that put their lives on the line every day to keep our communities safe. This award specifically recognizes those who are serving or have served their departments honorably.

“These selfless canines prove their devotion time and time again,” said AKC Vice President Gina DiNardo. “They demonstrate loyalty, valor and honor in their careers and each of these dogs has made a substantial sacrifice in the line of duty. It is with great esteem that we honor these working dogs with the AKC Paw of Courage as an indication of our appreciation.”

Any working dog is eligible to receive the AKC Paw of Courage; the award is not specific to purebred dogs. To nominate a dog for the next set of Paw of Courage awards, click here. Recipients of the award, or their human partner, will receive a 2017 AKC Paw of Courage medal along with a certificate. In addition, the recipients will receive a photo and profile on akc.org.

The first set of 2017 AKC Paw of Courage recipients are:

K9 Bruno of Anaheim Police Department, CA

K9 Bruno, a seven-year-old German Shepherd Dog, served with the Anaheim Police Department for six years at the time of his injury. He was given an AKC Humane Fund Award for Canine Excellence (ACE) by the American Kennel Club in 2014 after being shot while assisting the SWAT team with a search. The bullet went through Bruno’s lower jaw and lodged in his chest, only about an inch from his heart. After the incident, Bruno retired from his K9 duties and lived at home with his partner, Officer R.J. Young. About two years later, K9 Bruno succumbed to complications from his initial injury.

Bruno was one of two dogs who trained to become part of the SWAT team. He graduated first in his class from the K9 academy and also won first place overall in narcotics during his first ever K9 competition. Bruno was credited with finding millions of dollars’ worth of narcotics and narcotic-related money. He was always full of energy and was well known around the department for disrupting briefings by chewing on his red toy. K9 Bruno was a cherished officer, partner and family companion and will be missed dearly by Officer Young and the Anaheim Police Department, as well as every one of the many lives he has touched.

K9 Mattis of the Alpharetta Police Department, GA

K9 Mattis, a three-year-old German Shepherd Dog, serves with the Alpharetta Police Department. In October of 2016, while handler, Officer Mark Tappan and K9 Mattis were in a foot pursuit, the suspect leapt off a 30-foot retaining wall and Mattis followed without hesitation, leading to his surrender. Mattis was checked for obvious injuries and was quickly on his way to respond to the next call with Officer Tappan. They were able to track down and apprehend the second suspect shortly before Mattis collapsed from internal injuries from the earlier fall. He was rushed to the emergency vet where he was treated for a lacerated liver and a contusion of his right lung.

Mattis has since made a full recovery and returned to active duty. In his short time with the department, Mattis has contributed to over 100 arrests and has assisted in removing countless amounts of narcotics from the streets. Additionally, he has performed several demonstrations for church groups, schools and various other community groups, often surrounded by the children of the community. Officer Tappan describes K9 Mattis as a very special blend of tenacious working dog and friendly family pet. Mattis’ lack of hesitation jumping off the wall demonstrates his dedication and loyalty to his work. The sacrifice Mattis made that day to protect his community is truly appreciated by Officer Tappan, the Alpharetta Police Department and the community he serves.

K9 Jardo of the Boise Police Department, ID

K9 Jardo was a six-year-old Belgian Malinois of the Boise Police Department in Idaho when he was shot in the line of duty while confronting an armed suspect. Jardo was rushed to WestVet Animal Emergency and Specialty Center with at least one gunshot wound to the chest. He underwent surgery and two dogs, both pets of staff members at WestVet, donated blood to Jardo, giving him a life-saving transfusion. The surgery and transfusion were successful and Jardo was expected to make a full recovery. However, about a week later, he succumbed to his injuries.

K9 Jardo was trained to track and apprehend dangerous criminals, find evidence relating to crimes and locate street drugs. He successfully apprehended a dangerous gang member in his very first week on patrol. When he was not on duty, Jardo enjoyed playing with his dog friends and swimming in the canal by his house. K9 Jardo made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty to protect his community. He will be missed dearly by his handler, Officer Shane Williams, as well as the entire Boise Police Department and each person he has touched throughout his life.

K9 Peydro of the Woodland Police Department, CA

K9 Peydro is a three-year-old German Shepherd Dog, handled by Officer Juan Barrera. He served the Woodland Police Department honorably for a little over a year. In May of 2016, Peydro was struck by a vehicle while he and Officer Barrera were in pursuit of a wanted man. K9 Peydro was immediately transported to a veterinary hospital and after a successful surgery and blood transfusion, he made a full recovery, but was medically retired in October of 2016.

The suspect involved in the incident later turned himself in to the Woodland Police Department. Peydro was a dual purpose police K9 trained in narcotics, apprehension, and article searching. He weighs about 80 lbs, but Officer Barrera and his family are convinced that he thinks he's a lap dog. When he’s not on duty, he loves to cuddle up on the couch and balance toys on his nose. Peydro’s sacrifice in the line of duty was an indication of his courage and commitment to his community. He is now enjoying his retired life with his family.

For downloadable images of the recipients, click here.

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About the American Kennel Club

Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization, which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function. Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog. For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers

 

New York, NY – TheAmerican Kennel Club® (AKC®) is pleased to announce the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award finalists in the categories of Conformation, Companion Events and Performance Events.

The Awards, created and first awarded in 1999, are presented in recognition of exceptional participation and achievement within the dog fancy. The finalists chosen, based on nominations from AKC member clubs, have impacted the dog sport on a national level through club involvement, judging, exhibiting, breeding and teaching.

The three finalists in each category will be voted on by member clubs, with voting ending on Tuesday, October 25, 2016. Winners will be announced by the end of October. Presentation of awards to the winners will be made in conjunction with the AKC National Championship presented by Royal Canin in Orlando, Florida December 17th and 18th.

This year’s nominees are:

Conformation

  • Patricia W. Laurens, of Newtown, Connecticut, has been active in dogs for over 50 years as an exhibitor, all-breed handler and breeder of Best in Show, National Specialty winning and top producing German Wirehaired Pointers. She has served as Delegate for the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America for over 30 years. During that time, she was elected to the AKC Board of Directors and started an AKC Breeders Education program and helped establish the Junior Scholarship program.When Pat left the Board of Directors in 2000 she was elected to the Parent Club Committee and has served as its Chairperson from 2000 to the present. During this tenure she helped establish the Parent Club Conference Program and chaired three National Parent Club Conferences. In 2013 she helped establish the AKC Reunite Pet Disaster Trailer Program and serves as its co-chairman. Read more.

Companion Events

  • Susan (Suzi) B. Bluford, of Carmel, California, is so grateful and honored to be nominated once again for this prestigious award. She began in the sport of AKC dogs during the early 1970’s with her first dog- Golden Retriever “Wendy”, who became a breed CH, UD, WC. Suzi was hooked in all areas of the sport! In 1977, her Golden Retriever, “Streaker”, was the number one obedience dog in the United States as well as a breed champion and an owner-handled group winner. She is an active participant in conformation, obedience, rally, tracking, retriever hunt tests and field trials, herding, nosework and agility, and bred “Dasu Goldens” for many years.Read more.
  • Elizabeth (Tibby) Chase, of Monson, Massachusetts, desperately wanted a Welsh pony as a child, but her sensible parents presented her with a Pembroke Welsh Corgi. This little dog introduced Tibby to the challenging world of dog training and was her first high in trial dog in 1961. She has been involved with dogs, dog training and Corgis ever since. While obedience is her first love, Tibby has successfully trained and shown dogs in rally, tracking, agility, herding, and conformation. One ‘special’ Pembroke, “Tyler”, Ch. Heronsway Free Style UDT ROMX, is one of a few obedience titled dogs to win the breed at Westminster. Read more.
  • Nancy Craig, Read more.
    • Jim Campbell, of Marrero, Louisiana, grew up in in rural Mississippi in the 1950’s and 60’s. Rabbit hunting with grade beagles instilled in him a love for the sport. In 1978, he got his first AKC registered beagles. After moving to New Orleans he met Maurice Ellis, Rannie Ladner and Tommy Moffet. Jim gives credit to them for teaching him what to look for in a hound and how to condition them. His first good dog was Jazztown T-Beau, who had a great nose, outstanding line control and check work that set the standard for what he looks for in a dog to this day. Jim has bred many worthy hounds over the years, seven of which finished as AKC field champions. He finished four field champions himself, two of which went on to win the AKC SPO Nationals. FC JO's Hustler won the Southern States Championship twice. Read more.
  • Teri Dickinson, of Lucas, TX, began her performance career with a mixed-breed dog she trained and entered in an obedience fun match. That led to the acquisition of her first Italian Greyhound in 1984, who went on to become an American Canadian Champion and Utility Dog. After putting dual titles on several more Italian Greyhounds, Teri became interested in lure coursing and other lure sports. As a board member of the Italian Greyhound Club of America, she led a successful campaign to have Italian Greyhounds added to eligible coursing breeds.She and husband, Jack Downing, bred Italian Greyhounds under the Whirlwind prefix and participated in conformation, coursing, agility and amateur racing. Teri bred the first AKC dual champion, DC Whirlwind Blew By You LCM OA NAJ GRC JOR MC. Read more.

Performance

  • Melody Fair, of Noti, Oregon, and husband Roy, acquired their first Basset Hound, Misty in late 1970. Misty was their first title holder, earning her CD. Bassets have always been Melody’s primary breed, but over the years other breeds have graced their couch: four Newfoundlands, a Pembroke, a Borzoi, a retired racing Greyhound and the newest addition, a Doberman. The Bassets have earned titles in the show ring, Field Trials (over 20 Field Championships), Tracking, TD (working on number 16), TDX (working on number 6), and still hopeful for an elusive VST. Over 10 of her Bassets have earned Dual championships. They have earned titles and/or competed in Obedience, Rally, Agility, Coursing Ability, BHCA Hunting Performance Test and NACSW K9 Nosework. Read more.

For more about the nominees and the Lifetime Achievement Awards, visit the AKC website here.

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About the American Kennel Club

Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.


Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers


American Humane, the country’s first national humane organization that for 140 years has been first to serve the interests of animals, was named the Outstanding Animal Welfare Organization of the Year by the Pet Philanthropy Circle at the glittering Pet Hero Awards gala in New York City, hosted by beloved voice of NBC’s National Dog Show David Frei and co-chaired by Georgina Bloomberg and Prince Lorenzo Borghese. Adding to the organization’s notable win, longtime supporter, American Humane board member and country music star Naomi Judd was named Humanitarian of the Year.

“Due to American Humane’s outstanding contributions to animal welfare, the organization has been selected by the Executive Board of the Pet Philanthropy Circle for the Animal Welfare Organization of the Year Award,” said Jewel Morris, noted animal advocate and founding president of Pet Philanthropy Circle. “Your commitment to animal welfare exemplifies the dedication that our Board evaluates worthy of this esteemed award.”

For 140 years, American Humane has been first to serve in the protection of animals in every sphere of life – in our homes and communities, on our farms and ranches, on the silver screen, and in human care at zoos, aquariums and conservation centers. The organization also works to save more of the 6-8 million animals relinquished each year to the nation’s shelters and get them into loving, forever homes. And in just the past dozen years, American Humane saved, sheltered and helped more than 80,000 animals caught in disasters and cruelty cases. The organization positively reaches some 1 billion animals with direct services each year – more than any other in its field.

Country star and American Humane Board Member Naomi Judd Also Honored

Adding to American Humane’s win, the Pet Philanthropy Circle honored the country star and the organization’s longtime supporter and board member as the Humanitarian of the Year. The award recognized her wide-ranging charitable work, including her advocacy for America’s military hero dogs. Ms. Judd worked with American Humane to have Congress change the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), mandating that these four-legged veterans be brought home and retired on U.S. soil and reunited with their former handlers after their service is finished. Congress changed and passed the NDAA, which was then signed into law by the President late last year.

“For nearly a century and a half the staff and volunteers at American Humane have worked to be the first to serve in the protection of animals,” said American Humane President and CEO Dr. Robin Ganzert. “We are deeply honored by this award and thank the remarkable and esteemed members of the Pet Philanthropy Circle board, which includes so many of the nation’s leading animal advocates. On behalf of the one billion animals we serve each year, thank you!”  

           

About American Humane

American Humane is the country's first national humane organization, founded in 1877. For more information, please visit www.americanhumane.org.


 

                              PET PHILANTHROPY CIRCLE ANNOUNCES
                                  The 2016 "PET HERO AWARD WINNERS"

 

The Pet Hero Awards™ are notably the nation’s most prestigious animal welfare award ceremony showcasing people, organizations, corporations, veterinarians and pets that serve to inspire others to promote animal welfare.  These awards showcase the causes and needs of those who protect animals.Co-Chairs, Georgina Bloomberg, Prince Lorenzo Borghese and myself invite all Media to cover an amazing event. Email Gregg Oehler directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Pet Hero Awards ceremony at the elegant Gotham Hall in Manhattan on Friday October 7th, 2016.The 2016 Award winners include an all-star lineup.Naomi Judd will be receiving the Humanitarian of the Year Award for her tireless work in lobbying in Washington, DC to ensure the safe return of all service dogs that have served in the US Military.

 

Alison Eastwood, actress, daughter of Clint Eastwood, and Founder of the Eastwood Ranch Foundation, is the Animal Advocate of the Year, recognized for her outstanding success with saving animals from kill shelters in Southern California.
Dr. Robin Ganzert
, will be accepting the Outstanding Animal Welfare Organization award as CEO of the American Humane Association whose efforts have impacted hundreds of millions of animals. The Petco Foundation is being awarded the Foundation of the Year for helping 4.9 million pets find homes.  Katie Cleary, Executive Producer and Writer of the movie, Give Me Shelter on Netflix, President of Peace for Animals, and Founder and Editor in Chief of the Animal News Network is receiving the Animal Welfare Spokesperson Award. 

 

The Heart Organization has earned the Animal Welfare Education Award for their national youth education program that teaches compassion and respect for all living beings. Jamie’s Rescue in Miami brings focus on the challenges of rescuing street dogs in inner cities and is awarded the Rescue Organization of the Year.
Outstanding Junior of the Year, Matthew Talbot, proves we are never too young to make a difference in saving animal lives. The Outstanding Pet, Amazing Grace, a dog destined to a gruesome death in a gas chamber survived and inspires humans to end this cruel, unnecessary way of eliminating dogs. Tributes for all Pet Hero Award winners are available on the PetCircle.org website.

 "Humanitarian of the Year".... .......Naomi Judd                          

 "Animal Advocate of the Year"..... Alison Eastwood                 
"Foundation of the Year"...............The Petco Foundation 
 "Animal Welfare Spokesperson Award"....Katie Cleary 
"Animal Welfare Education Award"....The Heart Organization
"Rescue Organization of the Year"....Jamie's Rescue
"Outstanding Junior of the Year".......Matthew Talbot
"Outstanding Animal Welfare Organization"...American Humane Association, 
      Robin Ganzert...President/CEO

The Pet Philanthropy Circle will commemorate this special 5th anniversary with a VIP Cocktail Reception, the Awards Program, the Alex Donner Orchestra and entertainment by Beau Hulse.  This optional black tie event will be Co-hosted by Jewel Morris, Founder of the Pet Philanthropy Circle and David Frei, NBC Commentator and former Westminster Dog Show Host

 

Sponsors are welcome and currently include Subaru of America, the Park Lane Hotel, The Petco Foundation, American Humane Association, Hamptons Magazine, and Hamptons Pet "The Luxury Global Pet Magazine".

 

By showcasing these outstanding contributions, the Pet Philanthropy Circle hopes to inspire everyone to become involved in defending the rights of animals. Honorees and guests fly in from around the country to attend this enlightening and entertaining celebration of animals and the causes that protect them. 

For tickets www.petphilanthropycircle.com/tickets or call 631 255- 7911 

              

 

 

The American Kennel Club (AKC®), the world’s largest purebred dog registry and leading advocate for dogs, is pleased to announce the second round of the AKC Paw of Courage award recipients, to show appreciation for the many sacrifices that working dogs make while serving and protecting our country. This award specifically recognizes the extraordinary sacrifices of dogs who have been severely injured or killed in the line of duty.

“These canine heroes have proven to be fearless and devoted,” said AKC Vice President Gina DiNardo. “They continuously put their lives on the line without hesitation and each of these dogs has made a significant sacrifice in the line of duty to protect us. They have truly touched the lives of many and we are proud to honor them with the AKC Paw of Courage as a symbol of our gratitude.”

 

Any working dog is eligible to receive the AKC Paw of Courage; the award is not specific to purebred dogs. Recipients of the award, or their former human partner, will receive a 2016 AKC Paw of Courage medal along with a certificate. In addition, the recipients will receive a photo and profile on akc.org.

The second round of 2016 AKC Paw of Courage recipients are:

K9 Officer Nicky: of Las Vegas Metro Police Department, NV

K9 Nicky was an eight-year-old Belgian Malinois of the Las Vegas Metro Police Department in Nevada. He had been part of the department for over five years when he was shot and killed while responding to an incident with his handler, Sergeant Eric Kearns. The suspect was walking through a neighborhood reportedly shooting at people randomly. He had murdered two innocent people and was threatening the rest of the neighborhood. Nicky was deployed as officers attempted to take the subject into custody. During the course of apprehending the suspect, a firefight ensued between the suspect and the police and Nicky was killed during the shootout.

At the time of his tragic death, Nicky had only been back on duty for a little over a month after recovering from a previous incident where he was severely wounded. Nicky was deployed to apprehend a suspect who had been barricaded for over 12 hours. He quickly engaged the suspect who was armed with a machete and viciously attacked K9 Officer Nicky. He was rushed to the emergency vet where he underwent surgery to repair the machete wounds to his face, chest and paws. Nicky made a quick recovery and was anxious to get back to work, returning to full duty just 3 weeks after the incident. Sergeant Kearns says that even with scars on his face, it was clear that Nicky was happy to be back at work. During his career, Nicky had 99 apprehensions of suspects who had committed various crimes including burglary, robbery and murder.

Even as a puppy, Nicky’s potential was clear. He began his training in KNVP, the royal Dutch Police Dog Training program where he titled as a PH1 with honors. Nicky was a courageous, strong and driven K9 Officer. He enjoyed his work tremendously whether he was right in the action, searching for and apprehending suspects or just driving around with Sergeant Kearns, patrolling the streets of Las Vegas. K9 Nicky was a true hero who made the ultimate sacrifice to serve and protect. Nicky is deeply missed by Sergeant Eric Kearns as well as the entire Las Vegas Metro Police Department.

K9 Officer Aren: of Port Authority of Allegheny County Police Department, PA

K9 Aren, a five-year-old German Shepherd Dog of the Port Authority of Allegheny County in Pennsylvania, was stabbed to death during an apprehension this past January. K9 Aren, along with his handler Officer Brian O’Malley and other officers, had engaged a subject in a foot pursuit following an incident at the Wilkinsburg transit station. K9 Aren located the subject and was released to attempt an apprehension. The subject stabbed and killed K9 Aren before being fatally shot by the officers on scene.

Aren was trained in patrol tactics, and explosive detection as well as SWAT K9 operations. He assisted in numerous arrests throughout the transit system as well as performing daily explosive sweeps. K9 Aren was a treasured K9 Officer and will always be remembered by the Port Authority Police of Allegheny County as well as his partner, Officer O’Malley.

K9 Officer Jethro: of Canton Police Department, OH

Jethro was an AKC registered German Shepherd Dog of the Canton Police Department in Ohio. In January 2016, Jethro and his handler Officer Ryan Davis, responded to an alarm at a grocery store. As the pair entered the warehouse area, Jethro quickly picked up on the presence of a person and went to investigate. The subject was located and when he continued to disobey officers’ commands, Jethro was deployed. The subject opened fire, shooting Jethro multiple times before fleeing on foot. The suspect was later apprehended a short distance away. Jethro was rushed to the Stark County Veterinary Emergency Clinic where he eventually succumbed to his wounds

Jethro was brought home at 8 weeks of age as a family pet with the intent of possibly becoming a working dog. In November of 2014 Officer Davis’ first partner retired and Jethro had been screened and had begun his official schooling to become Davis’ next partner. Officer Davis and Jethro handled hundreds of calls together including alarms, trouble calls and burglaries. Officer Davis describes Jethro as a giant gentle beast. He says Jethro was “a 105 lb lap dog who could apprehend a criminal and then turn around and play with neighborhood kids.” He says that Jethro was “loyal to the end” and will be missed terribly.

 

K9 Officer Patrick: of Washington State Patrol, WA

Patrick was a three year old German Shepherd Dog of the Washington State Patrol in Washington. This past April, Trooper Mike Allan and his K9 partner, Patrick, participated in explosive detection training at the AMTRAK Seattle Sounder Station. During the training, Patrick screened two ferry loads of cars for explosives at Coleman Ferry Terminal. After conducting his work, Trooper Allan saw Patrick was in distress and rushed him to a vet. Patrick was suffering from tangled intestines and immediately underwent emergency surgery in attempt to save his life. The surgery was not successful and Patrick had to be euthanized later that night. 

Trooper Allan and K9 Patrick started their career together at Lackland Airforce Base in Texas in October 2015. In December 2015, Patrick and Trooper Allan became a certified K9 explosive team and served the citizens of Washington faithfully. Trooper Mike Allan and all members of the Homeland Security Division are mourning the loss of the courageous and loyal K9 Officer Patrick. 

K9 Officer Tryko: of Doraville Police Department, GA

K9 Tryko is a 12-year-old German Shepherd Dog of the Doraville Police Department in Georgia. He began his career as a police dog for the City of Doraville in 2006, and is now in his 10th year of service. This past April, K9 Tryko and his handler, Officer Jason Deyette, were assisting the U.S. Marshals Service Fugitive Taskforce in a search for a man wanted for numerous felonies across multiple counties. Tryko located the suspect hiding in a house and was stabbed in the mouth as he moved in to apprehend him. He lost a great deal of blood and sustained a number of punctures and lacerations to his tongue and mouth. Tryko healed and returned to full duty in about a month. Since returning to work after his injury, he has already had a number of apprehensions.

Tryko is trained in patrol work as well as narcotics detection. Over his exceptionally long career, he has been responsible for approximately 700 suspect apprehensions and 600 drug seizures; being directly involved in recovering nearly one million dollars in drug money. Tryko has met hundreds of children at schools, churches and community functions during K9 demonstrations.  He has also been called upon to assist many federal agencies including FBI, DEA, ICE, and the US Marshalls Service. In 2014, K9 Tryko was able to track, locate and apprehend a suspect who had shot and wounded two DeKalb County police officers a few hours prior. To Officer Deyette and the Doraville Police Department, K9 Tryko is considered a legend. According to the department, he is one of a kind and a truly special police dog. The sacrifices that he has made throughout his career are truly appreciated.

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