Displaying items by tag: akc

- Lab Ties Poodle for the Longest Consecutive Reign at #1 and Bulldog Enters Top 5 -

New York, NY – Proving that bigger really is better, the American Kennel Club (AKC®) announced today that the Bulldog has muscled its way into the top 5, becoming the fifth most popular dog in the U.S. according to AKC Registration Statistics, bumping the tiny Yorkshire Terrier into sixth place for the first time since 2003. The Golden Retriever also pushed its way back to the top, overtaking the Beagle for third place, and Rottweilers continued their climb up the top 10 list by taking ninth place away from the Dachshund, both adding to the bigger breed trend. Labrador Retriever lovers have again spoken – the playful, family friendly breed remains the number one most popular breed in the U.S. for the 22nd consecutive year, tying with the Poodle for the longest reign in the top spot.

“Bigger breeds are making their move,” said AKC Spokesperson Lisa Peterson. “The popularity of the pint-sized, portable pooch just gave way to a litter of larger breeds in the Top 10. These predictable, durable, steady breeds, like Labs and Goldens, are great with kids and offer the whole family more dog to love.”

2012 Most Popular Dogs in the U.S.

2011 Ranking

1. Labrador Retriever

1. Labrador Retriever

2. German Shepherd Dog

2. German Shepherd Dog

3. Golden Retriever

3. Beagle

4. Beagle

4. Golden Retriever

5. Bulldog

5. Yorkshire Terrier

6. Yorkshire Terrier

6. Bulldog

7. Boxer

7. Boxer

8. Poodle

8. Poodle

9. Rottweiler

9. Dachshund

10. Dachshund

10. Rottweiler

Most Notable Dog Trends in 2012 Include:

In addition, the AKC expanded its litter of recognized breeds on January 1 to include the Chinook and Portuguese Podengo Pequeno, growing AKC’s family to 177 breeds.

Get social with the AKC! Join us on Facebook and Twitter.

###

The American Kennel Club (AKC), proudly celebrates its 125th Anniversary in 2009. Since 1884 the not-for-profit organization has maintained the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world, and today its rules govern more than 20,000 canine competitions each year. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function. Along with its nearly 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Companion Animal Recovery and the AKC Museum of the Dog. For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

To become a fan of the AKC on Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com/americankennelclub. To follow the AKC on Twitter, go to http://www.twitter.com/akcdoglovers.

AKC OFFERS TIPS FOR SAFE HOLIDAY SEASON WITH YOUR DOG

New York, NY – The holidays are a fun and happy time, but they are also extremely hectic. One family member that can get lost in the hustle and bustle is the dog. Because of the added stress and frequent travel that the holidays can bring, the American Kennel Club (AKC®) offers safety tips for dog owners, and also reminds those considering adding a dog to their home this holiday season that puppies are not stocking stuffers.

“Nothing tops a holiday wish list more than a cute cuddly puppy, but there are many dangers associated with this season for dogs,” said AKC Spokesperson Lisa Peterson. “Because of that, many responsible breeders do not breed litters with a Christmas delivery due date. Bringing a puppy into your life in the “off-season” is a safer alternative than exposing a new puppy to holiday dangers in the home. Consider gift wrapping dog toys or supplies such as a leash or food bowl to symbolize the gift of a puppy to come.”

Puppies are a life-time responsibility and their first few weeks at home are critical – they require a great deal of time, attention, and love. With the disrupted schedules and chaos of the holidays, it would be extremely difficult to set aside the time a puppy needs during this important stage of its life. Moreover, the many holiday hazards that affect adult dogs are often compounded for a new puppy in an unfamiliar setting such as his new home.

With the holidays rapidly approaching, the AKC offers the following tips for dog owners to keep their four-legged friends happy and safe this season. Among them:

- Holiday Dangers Facing Dogs & Puppies -

  • Holiday visitors coming to your home may not be dog owners and can inadvertently leave doors open which let dogs escape and could confuse new puppies who are not familiar with the family yard yet.

  • Avoid using food such as popcorn or cranberry strands when decorating your home or Christmas tree. If eaten, they can cause blockages, which can require surgery to remove. Puppies are notorious chewers when young.

  • Place anything shiny, such as ornaments, tinsel, glass bulbs, and things that sparkle and catch your dog’s eye, higher up on your tree where he can’t reach them. Ingesting ornaments can cause major problems for your dog or puppy.

  • Real Christmas trees, poinsettias, holly, and mistletoe all can be dangerous for your dog. Consider having an artificial tree, but if you do have a natural one, make sure your dog doesn’t swallow the pine needles or drink the tree water which can cause stomach irritation. Poinsettias, holly, and mistletoe should be kept out of your dog’s reach, as they can be poisonous to pets.

  • Exposed wires from holiday lights pose a threat to your inquisitive puppy – if he chews on them, he could be electrocuted. Tape indoor wires to the wall and outdoor wires to the side of the house where your dog can’t reach them.

  • Rambunctious puppies can also knock over lit candles causing house fires and receive serious burns from hot wax. They may also be inclined to investigate a fireplace too closely.

  • Common holiday foods such as chocolate, butter, meat, and candy can make your dog very ill. Don’t let your puppy’s cute adorable eyes convince you that they should be given a treat. Take care to keep these foods out of reach.

Additional holiday pet safety tips can be found at https://www.akc.org/press_center/facts_stats.cfm?page=13.

###

The American Kennel Club (AKC), proudly celebrates its 125th Anniversary in 2009. Since 1884 the not-for-profit organization has maintained the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world, and today its rules govern more than 20,000 canine competitions each year. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function. Along with its nearly 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Companion Animal Recovery and the AKC Museum of the Dog. For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

To become a fan of the AKC on Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com/americankennelclub. To follow the AKC on Twitter, go to http://www.twitter.com/akcdoglovers.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Purebred Registry Group Routinely Blocks Legislative Protections for Dogs

(July 9, 2012) -- The Humane Society of the United States released a report calling on the American Kennel Club to reverse course and support efforts to protect dogs from the worst abuses at puppy mills. The report also criticizes AKC for pandering to the interests of large-scale, commercial breeding facilities rather than serving smaller-scale, high-quality breeders who make up the majority of AKC.

The report notes that numerous puppy mill operators who have been charged with animal cruelty have been selling AKC registered puppies and some of them even passed AKC inspections.

“The American Kennel Club bills itself as ‘The Dog’s Champion,’ but our report shows a pattern of activity that is entirely at odds with that self-description,” said Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of The HSUS. “The AKC has opposed more than 80 bills and proposals in the last five years that would have implemented common-sense, humane standards of care at large-scale breeding facilities. We are shocked that a group that should be standing shoulder to shoulder with us is constantly lined up with the puppy mill industry.”

The report is based on information uncovered during HSUS-assisted raids of puppy mills, AKC “alerts” sent to breeders, materials published on AKC’s website, and AKC’s lobbying activities over the past five years.

Among the findings:

  • Humane organizations have assisted law enforcement in rescuing suffering dogs from large puppy mills whose operators regularly registered dogs with AKC. In just the past six months, this includes three facilities in North Carolina where more than 250 dogs were caged in squalor. Ironically, the AKC’s primary office is located in Raleigh.
  • Over the past five years, AKC has opposed more than 80 different state bills and local ordinances designed to provide stronger protections for dogs in puppy mills. The group has opposed landmark measures enacted in Missouri, North Carolina, Oregon, West Virginia, Texas, Washington and other states.
  • Since the end of the 1990s, when AKC was facing a boycott of its registry by large-scale, commercial dog breeding facilities, the group has dedicated significant resources to fighting laws that would regulate those facilities.
  • In 2012 alone, AKC asked its supporters to oppose laws in several states that would have required puppy producers to comply with basic care standards; legislation in three states that would have prevented the debarking of dogs without a medical reason; an ordinance in a Tennessee town designed to prevent dogs from being left in hot cars; a Rhode Island state bill to prevent people from chaining or crating a dog for more than 14 hours a day; and a Louisiana state bill that would have prevented breeding facilities from keeping dogs in stacked, wire-floored cages.
  • AKC has attempted to deflect independent regulation of large-scale breeders on grounds that it maintains an internal kennel inspections program, but standards for the program are unclear and its results unpublished. The HSUS report discloses that some puppy mills had been “inspected” by AKC but were still the subject of law enforcement-led rescues – with facility operators later convicted of animal cruelty on account of the poor conditions of their dogs.
  • Most recently, AKC has been lobbying breeders to oppose a proposed U.S. Department of Agriculture rule that would regulate Internet puppy sellers under the federal Animal Welfare Act. AKC’s chair described the regulations as "onerous," even though the proposal includes exemptions for breeders with fewer than five breeding female dogs as well as breeders who sell only to buyers they meet in person.

While the AKC does have beneficial programs such as an annual Responsible Dog Ownership Day and AKC Companion Animal Recovery disaster relief assistance, these make up just a tiny percentage of AKC’s annual outlays. Therefore, the report calls on AKC to distance itself from the large-scale, commercial dog-breeding industry and return to its original focus of representing small, premium, responsible breeders who belong to national breed clubs, participate in dog shows and other events, and have the welfare of their dogs as their top priority.

The report comes a week before the close of the public comment period on the USDA’s retail pet stores rule, a rule designed to ensure that large-scale puppy producers like this one who sell animals online or by mail or phone sight-unseen be regulated just like the producers who sell to pet stores. Concerned citizens can voice their support for the rule at humanesociety.org/usdapuppymills.


Follow The HSUS on Twitter. See our work for animals on your Apple or Android device by searching for our “HumaneTV” app.

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation's largest animal protection organization — backed by 11 million Americans, or one of every 28. For more than a half-century, The HSUS has been fighting for the protection of all animals through advocacy, education and hands-on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty — on the Web at humanesociety.org.

 

–The Russell Terrier Gains Full AKC Recognition While Three Other Breeds Move into the Miscellaneous Class –

New York, NY - The American Kennel Club® (AKC®) expanded its litter of registered breeds on June 27 to welcome the Russell Terrier to the Terrier Group, growing AKC’s family to 175 breeds. Also moving up the ranks to the Miscellaneous class on the same day are the Coton de Tulear, Spanish Water Dog, and Miniature American Shepherd.

“The AKC is excited to welcome this adventurous terrier to the registry,” said AKC Spokesperson Lisa Peterson. “Energetic and full of life, the Russell Terrier will make a wonderful companion for active people.”

The Russell Terrier is feisty and playful with an enormous amount of energy and a strong instinct for hunting. Originating in England and developed in Australia, the breed was used for fox hunting as well as finding vermin below ground. They are small, confident, and highly intelligent dogs that are devoted and loving family companions. Because of their energy and intensity, Russell Terriers do best

Fiona Cheever/Courtesy Nodie Williams in a family with an active lifestyle. Their weatherproof coat requires minimal grooming beyond brushing and occasional bathing.

To become an AKC recognized breed there needs to be a certain number of dogs geographically distributed throughout the U.S. and an established breed club to watch over them. Breeds waiting to gain full recognition are recorded in AKC’s Foundation Stock Service® (FSS®). More information on the process can be found at the AKC’s Web site.

For more information about this breed, visit the American Russell Terrier Club or meet the Russell Terrier in person at AKC Meet the Breeds at the Javits Center in New York City on October 20th and 21st or at the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship December 15th and 16th in Orlando, Florida. Visit www.meetthebreeds.com for more details.

Get social with the AKC! Join us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

###

The American Kennel Club, founded in 1884, is a not-for-profit organization which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its nearly 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 20,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Companion Animal Recovery and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

RALEIGH, N.C. (April 30, 2012) – Fifty percent of dogs aged 10 years or older develop cancer at some point during their lives. To help dog owners better understand the treatment options, cutting-edge research and ways to support canine cancer research, the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) today launches a public awareness and fundraising campaign to kick off Pet Cancer Awareness Month, May 1-31, 2012.

“Cancer affects all dogs,” said Dr. Shila Nordone, CHF Chief Scientific Officer. “Canine cancer research is a major funding priority of our parent clubs and individual supporters. As stewards of their contributions, we make sure that cancer research continues to be a major component of our research portfolio.”

CHF is the most highly regarded organization funding sound, scientific research exclusively for dogs. Since 1995 CHF has funded nearly $8.3 million in canine cancer research. This research has provided breakthroughs in treatment options and diagnosis and has helped scientists study cancer at the cellular level, allowing veterinarians to diagnose cancer earlier and treat it more effectively. CHF-funded research has a broad impact, extending beyond dogs to having application to human cancer diagnosis and treatment.

The public awareness and fundraising campaign runs through the month of May and uses social media and online outreach, podcasts and website features to promote not only CHF-funded research, but information on different types of canine cancer, care for dogs with cancer and other cancer-related health resources. The podcasts release schedule and topics are:

· Thursday, April 26: CHF Cancer Research, with Dr. Shila Nordone, CHF Chief Scientific Officer

· Thursday, May 3: Cancer Research Infrastructure, with Dr. Bruce Smith, Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine

· Thursday, May 17: Hemangiocarcinoma Research, with Dr. Jaime Modiano, University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine

· Thursday, May 31: Osteosarcoma Research, with Dr. Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University

Dog owners and dog lovers are encouraged to take part in the Foundation’s goal to help raise funds for canine health research through two special honor and memorial gift programs. The Celebration Wall is a special online photo gallery in memory of much loved dogs. This memorial is a fitting tribute for dogs that have died from cancer or another disease. For more information about the Celebration Wall, visit www.akcchf.org/celebrationwall.

Heroes for Health Research pages are custom-built personal donation webpages. Pages can be created for any canine hero – whether it is a dog battling cancer or a dog that has been a great companion. Participants are encouraged to invite family and friends to donate to their page. For more information about Hero for Health Research, visit www.akcchf.org/heropages.

Contributions raised through the Celebration Wall and Hero for Health Research will help CHF advance the health of all dogs by funding sound, scientific research to prevent, treat and cure canine disease.

For more information about Pet Cancer Awareness Month, visit www.akcchf.org/cancer.

To make contributions directly for canine health research, visit the CHF website at www.akcchf.org and click on the “Donate Today” button or text “dog” to 20222 to make a $5 donation.

To keep up-to-date on podcast releases, articles, and facts during Pet Cancer Awareness Month, like CHF at www.facebook.com/akccaninehealthfoundation or follow CHF on Twitter at @CanineHealthFnd.

# # #

About CHF

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs live longer, healthier lives by funding research that helps prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Established in 1995, CHF’s mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding sound, scientific research and supporting the dissemination of canine health information. Through the generous support of the American Kennel Club, Nestlé Purina PetCare, Pfizer Animal Health, dog clubs and dog owners worldwide, CHF has dedicated more than $33.2 million to canine health research projects and education programs. Visit CHF online at www.akcchf.org for more information.

 

Director of Communications
Ask AKC Columnist


Lisa has embraced the sport of purebred dogs for nearly 25 years as an owner/breeder/ handler of Norwegian Elkhounds. As a former journalist, Lisa regularly speaks to the media as an expert on purebred dog breeding and canine legislation as well as helps AKC clubs develop their own PR strategies.

Media Appearances:
  • NBC's Today Show – multiple appearances
  • Fox News Channel – The Big Story, The O'Reilly Factor, Fox News Live.
  • Martha Stewart Radio, NPR, GMA Radio
  • Quoted Expert in New York Times, USA Today

DOGNY: America's Tribute to Search and Rescue Dogs

People around the world were touched by the loyalty and resolve of the Search and Rescue Dogs who worked tirelessly to recover victims of the tragic events of September 11, 2001. In the aftermath of the attacks, the American Kennel Club coordinated efforts to assist the SAR handlers and dogs at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

In a continuing commemoration of the heroism of those SAR teams, the AKC established The American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery Corporation Canine Support and Relief Fund, a charitable fund to support professional and volunteer canine search and rescue organizations throughout the United States. The fund was launched with DOGNY, America's Tribute to Search and Rescue Dogs, a hugely successful public art initiative. We encourage you to explore these pages to learn more about DOGNY and the dogs and handlers it honors.

 

January 15, 2010

Dear Dog Lover,

We are pleased to inform you of a decision made by the AKC Board at the January 11, 2010 meeting, which will enhance the AKC Canine Partners program. This exciting new program allows mixed breed dog owners to list their dogs and participate in AKC Agility, Obedience and Rally events starting April 1, 2010.

While each club’s participation in the AKC Canine Partners program will remain voluntary, clubs may now choose to allow mixed breed participation at any AKC Agility, Obedience or Rally event. Mixed breeds will compete in the same classes and earn the same titles as their purebred counterparts.

This decision was made following a lengthy discussion and review of feedback from enrollees, delegates, clubs, show and trial chairpersons, current purebred exhibitors and potential mixed-breed exhibitors, prompting a reevaluation of the current program. AKC staff took into consideration the prior feedback received from the AKC Delegate body about the program and contacted each individual member of the AKC Delegates Committee for Obedience, Tracking and Agility and others regarding this feedback.

After taking into consideration staff recommendations; compelling feedback from dog owners, clubs and fanciers; and the long lead time for event applications, AKC decided it was best to move quickly and change the program format so a majority of clubs would have the option to take advantage of the opportunity to allow mixed breeds to compete in existing Agility, Obedience and Rally events beginning April 1, 2010.

This positive step forward for AKC and dog owners enables us to share our passion for dogs and our commitment to responsible dog ownership with an even greater audience. It will simplify the planning and management of club events, while benefiting mixed breed dog owners by giving them more opportunities to participate in events in their local areas.

Please contact AKC Canine Partners if you have any questions or comments you would like to share. Email - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 – Breed is Sixth Coonhound to Gain Full AKC Recognition –

 

New York, NY –The American Kennel Club® (AKC®) expanded its litter of registered breeds on January 1 to welcome the Treeing Walker Coonhound, growing AKC’s family to 174 breeds.

 

"The Treeing Walker is a fast, hot nosed, sensible hunter with a clear, ringing bugle voice," said AKC Spokesperson Lisa Peterson.  "The AKC welcomes this exceptional hunter to our family of breeds.”

 

The Treeing Walker Coonhound was bred originally -- like the other five AKC recognized coonhounds (American English Coonhound, Black and Tan Coonhound, Plott, Bluetick Coonhound and Redbone Coonhound) to help put food on the table.  See coonhounds recognized prior to 2012 on the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship which will be telecast on ABC Network Television on Saturday, February 4, 2012. Check local listings for airtimes. 

 

Historically the Treeing Walker Coonhound hunted raccoon, a principle source of fur and meat during the 19th and 20th centuries.  The breed assisted its owner in the hunt by “treeing” its quarry and announcing to the hunter with its bark that it had been found.  In fact this coon-hunting jargon is the basis of the present day idiom “barking up the wrong tree.”

 

Diane Lewis for AKC

Today the Treeing Walker is known as a fast and sensible hunter with superb endurance. The breed's coat is short, glossy and tri-colored - white, black and tan and requires minimal upkeep.  Intelligent, confident and sociable with family and friends the Treeing Walker thrives with regular exercise.  Be warned though, coonhounds are bred to be heard so if you are considering adding the breed to your household, be prepared for a voice loud enough to carry for miles through the woods.  For more information about this breed, visit the www.akc.org.

Diane Lewis for AKC

To become an AKC recognized breed there needs to be a certain number of dogs geographically distributed throughout the U.S. and an established breed club to watch over them.  Breeds waiting to gain full recognition are recorded in AKC’s Foundation Stock Service® (FSS®).  More information on the process can be found at the AKC’s Web site.

 

Get social with the AKC!  Join us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

###

The American Kennel Club (AKC) proudly celebrated its 125th Anniversary in 2009. Since 1884 the not-for-profit organization has maintained the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world, and today its rules govern more than 20,000 canine competitions each year. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function. Along with its nearly 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Companion Animal Recovery and the AKC Museum of the Dog. For more information, visit www.akc.org.

 

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

 

 RALEIGH, N.C. (January 10, 2012) - The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), the most highly regarded organization funding sound, scientific research exclusively for dogs, is pleased to announce the appointment of Shila Nordone, Ph.D., as its Chief Scientific Officer (CSO).

 

As CSO, Dr. Nordone will oversee CHF’s grant process, ensuring it remains rigorous and stringent. CHF awards grants in a variety of disciplines including, but not limited to, veterinary researchers, geneticists, and molecular biological scientists. Collaborative projects involving investigators from a variety of disciplines and/or institutions, such as human health researchers, are also encouraged to apply. Since its inception, CHF has dedicated more than $33.2 million to canine health research projects and educational programs. CHF’s goal is to help dogs live longer, healthier lives by conducting research to prevent, treat and cure canine disease.

 

“Dr. Nordone brings a wealth of experience to CHF,” said Terry Warren, Chief Executive Officer and General Counsel of the AKC Canine Health Foundation. “As a scientist and researcher Dr. Nordone has first-hand experience with hypothesis-driven research and the peer-review process, and she recognizes high-impact research. In addition, as a grant recipient and grant reviewer, Dr. Nordone understands that innovation and fiscal responsibility are not mutually exclusive, but rather, must work in tandem to drive success in the discovery of new treatments for our canine companions.” 

 

Dr. Nordone, a canine immunologist, comes to CHF with 10 years of experience in research and scientific training. She received her Ph.D. in immunology with a biotechnology minor from North Carolina State University (NCSU). Most recently, Dr. Nordone has been a Research Assistant Professor of Immunology with the Department of Molecular Biomedical Science at NCSU. As a director of independent research programs, a significant portion of Dr. Nordone’s research has focused on translational veterinary medicine.

 

If interested in applying for a CHF research grant, visit the CHF website at www.akcchf.org and click on the “Research” button.

 

Like CHF at www.facebook.com/akccaninehealthfoundation or follow us on Twitter at @CanineHealthFnd.

 

###

 

About CHF

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs live longer, healthier lives by funding research that helps prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Established in 1995, CHF’s mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding sound scientific research and supporting the dissemination of canine health information. Through the generous support of the American Kennel Club, Nestlé Purina PetCare, Pfizer Animal Health, dog clubs and dog owners worldwide, CHF has dedicated more than $33.2 million to canine health research projects and education programs. Visit CHF online at www.akcchf.org for more information.

 

 

Dogs from 50 States and More Than 45 Countries

 Vie for $225,000 at the Largest Dog Show in the Country

 

Event Broadcast airs on ABC Network Television

 Saturday, Feb. 4, 2012

NEW YORK, NY (November 30, 2011) – A record 3,938 dogs will compete for more than $225,000 in cash prizes at the eleventh annual AKC/Eukanuba National Championship (AENC) on December 17 and 18, 2011 in Orlando, Florida. The two-day event is held in conjunction with the AKC Agility Invitational, the AKC National Obedience Invitational (with entries of 592 and 146 respectively including our first-ever All-American Dogs), the Juniors events (159 conformation + 47 obedience + 50 agility entries) and the Eukanuba World Challenge (44 participants), making for a record-breaking combined entry of 4,976 for all events.

“We’re thrilled to welcome everyone to the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship. Not only is it the largest invitation-only dog show in our history, but it is the largest dog show in the country this year,” said Show Chairman Ron Menaker. “This unique event enables AKC to reach out to the public in unprecedented ways to promote the sport and educate families about dogs.”  

The Orange County Convention Center will also host several local kennel club dog shows in the days leading up to the main event. The Space Coast Kennel Club of Palm Bay, Brevard Kennel Club and Central Florida Kennel Club shows will precede the AENC on Dec. 14-16, 2011, making for five full days of dog shows. 

AKC/EUKANUBA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP BY THE NUMBERS

·         173 AKC recognized breeds are entered to compete.

·         The largest entries include:

o   64 Boston Terriers

o   61 Vizslas

o   58 French Bulldogs 

o   57 Rhodesian Ridgebacks

o   56 Retrievers (Labrador)

o   51 Australian Shepherds

o   50 Havanese

o   50 Retrievers (Golden)

o   48 Dachshunds (Longhaired)

o   46 Rottweilers

o   45 Pugs

o   44 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

o   44 Border Collies

·         The newest breeds to compete include:

o      3 American English Coonhounds

o      5 Entlebucher Mountain Dogs  

o      9 Finnish Lapphunds

o      8 Cesky Terriers

o    11 Norwegian Lundehunds

o    12 Xoloitzcuintli

·         All 14 AKC Miscellaneous Breeds will be represented.

·         More than 130 “Veterans” (between 7 & 12 years old) are entered. 

·         AKC Meet the Breeds® will feature 166 breeds at decorated booths staffed by experts. (Sat. & Sun. from 10 am to 4 pm)

·         By group, entry totals are: Sporting – 637; Hound – 526; Working – 605; Terrier – 441; Toy – 527; Non-Sporting – 469, Herding – 491 and Miscellaneous – 68

·         Dogs from 44 countries will compete in the Eukanuba World Challenge including Mexico, Australia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. The Eukanuba World Challenge is a one-of-a-kind event offering top dogs from around the world, and the winner of the Eukanuba Breeders’ Stakes, the opportunity to compete for the title of “Eukanuba World Challenge Champion” and a total of $15,000 in prize money.

·         Judge Mrs. Polly Smith of St. Stephens Church, Virginia will select the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship Best in Show (BIS) winner. The owner(s) of the BIS winner will receive more than $50,000 while the breeder(s) of the Best in Show winner will be awarded $15,000.

·         Mr. James Reynolds of Nepean, Ontario, Canada will select Best Bred-By Exhibitor in Show from among 1,328 dogs (35% of the total entry) entered in the Bred-by-Exhibitor (dogs being shown by their owner/breeder) competition, who will be eligible to win the $15,000 cash prize. Same-day streaming video coverage of all regular and bred-by groups and evening events will be provided on akc.org.

·         159 youngsters, ages 9-17, who have met high academic standards and qualification criteria based on year-round competition, will compete in Junior Showmanship.

·         Mrs. Zena Thorn Andrews, also a renowned breeder/judge of Dachshunds, will replace Tamas Jakkel to judge Dachshunds (Longhaired).  

·         Ms. Carla M.S. Molinari will judge Sari Brewster Tietjen’s entire assignment.

AGILITY AND OBEDIENCE INVITATIONALS BY THE NUMBERS

·         592 entries in the AKC Agility Invitational - 157 breeds from 46 states. Eukanuba and J & J Dog are proud sponsors of the AKC Agility Invitational.

·         146 entries in the AKC National Obedience Invitational - 55 breeds from 33 states and Canada. Eukanuba and J & J Dog are proud sponsors of the AKC National Obedience Invitational.

·         50 Juniors competing at the AKC National Juniors Agility Competition on Friday, Dec. 16th (8 am to 11 am).

·         48 Juniors competing at the AKC National Juniors Obedience Competition on Saturday, Dec. 17th (8 am to 3 pm).

·         9 All-American Dogs competing in Agility and 6 in Obedience.

To purchase tickets and get more information about the show visit www.akc.org/aenc. To receive daily updates and show results via Facebook, visit www.facebook.com/aenc and www.facebook.com/americankennelclub.  

#  #  #

The American Kennel Club (AKC), founded in 1884, maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world. Its rules and regulations govern more than 20,000 canine competitions each year.

         

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (October 19, 2011) The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) has awarded the Robert L. Kelly Memorial Scholarship to Rebecca Csomos, Ph.D., who is originally from Toledo, Ohio. A student at the prestigious University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) School of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Csomos receives $2,500 for her veterinary studies and interest in canine heart diseases.

 

“I was ecstatic and honored to receive the CHF scholarship,” said Dr. Csomos, who is using the scholarship to pay for her tuition at UPenn. “I adore purebred dogs and respect the mission of CHF. It is nice to have CHF support a rising VMD-Ph.D. who aspires to work in translational medicine for dogs.”

 

Dr. Csomos, who has always had a keen interest in scientific research, earned a Ph.D. in molecular and cellular pathology from the University of Michigan. While there, she primarily studied cell death signaling in cancer, the innate immune response, and the effects of copper on protein function. She is taking this background and now applying it to canine disease research.

 

“When I started vet school, I volunteered in the Cardiology department to help with enrollment for an ongoing study by Boehringer Ingelheim to assess the use of Pimobendan in Dobermans with asymptomatic dilated cardiomyopathy,” said Dr. Csomos. That volunteer work moved her to rescue a purebred Doberman named Euro, now three years old. “I love Dobermans and  

Cardiology. I hope to complete a residency in Cardiology and conduct clinical research to help advance our understanding and treatments for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Dobermans, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) in Boxers and other cardiovascular diseases that afflict dogs.”

 

The Robert L. Kelly Memorial Scholarship is named for one of CHF’s founding directors and former American Kennel Club board member and is presented annually to students pursuing dual degrees in veterinary medicine and research.

 

CHF is a non-profit organization dedicated to funding research to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Visit CHF online at www.akcchf.org for more information about the Foundation.

 

# # #

 

 

About CHF

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs live longer, healthier lives by funding research that helps prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Established by the American Kennel Club in 1995, CHF’s mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding sound scientific research and supporting the dissemination of canine health information. Since its inception, CHF has dedicated more than $33.2 million to canine health research projects and education programs. Visit CHF online at www.akcchf.org for more information.

 

Page 8 of 9