Displaying items by tag: akc

THE WESTMINSTER
KENNEL CLUB

The Westminster Kennel Club Announces
New Director of Communications
Gail Miller Bisher, a long-time communications professional as well
as dog show judge and exhibitor, has been named Director of
Communications for The Westminster Kennel Club. She replaces
David Frei, who has moved on to other opportunities but will be
hosting his last telecast of the Dog Show in 2016 on CNBC (Monday,
Feb. 15) and USA Network (Tuesday, Feb. 16) from 8-10pm ET.
Bisher (pronounced By-sher) has more than 30 years of experience
in the dog world as a handler, trainer, writer and spokesperson. She
is an AKC-licensed conformation judge and Canine Good Citizen
evaluator, with a background including conformation, obedience,
herding and earthdog trials.
Professionally, she has handled marketing, business development
and public relations for The American Kennel Club as well as various
dog websites. She has appeared in major media including NBC's
Today show, the New York Times and CNN as well as handling radio
media tours nationwide.
Bisher's history with The Westminster Kennel Club began when she won second place in Junior
Showmanship at the WKC show, and she has worked in the press room and produced video segments
at The Westminster Dog Show in past years.
"We are delighted to have Gail Bisher as the new face of The Westminster Kennel Club," said Club
President Mr. Seán W. McCarthy. "Her experience in the dog world combined with her high level of
qualifications as a Communications professional ensure that the 140-year legacy of The Westminster
Kennel Club is in good hands."
Westminster Show Chair Mr. Thomas H. Bradley, 3d., seconded the confidence: "Gail is a pleasure to
work with as well as a consummate communications pro," he said.
For her part, Bisher could not be happier. "For someone who loves dogs as I do, there is nothing more
exciting than to be part of The Westminster Kennel Club - the premier organization in our sport and such
a strong voice for all dogs," she stated.
Assisting Bisher in the Communications Department this year are Katherine Wright, a third-generation
terrier breeder and exhibitor, and Terri Cude, who spent many years in the sport along with having 30+
years' experience in the communications field.facebook: WKCDogShow / twitter: @WKCDOGS / instagram: westminsterkennelclub


- The American Hairless Terrier and Sloughi Join the Pack -
New York – The American Kennel Club (AKC®) announces the full recognition of the American
Hairless Terrier and the Sloughi, raising the total number of AKC dog breeds to 189.
“We’re excited to welcome these two unique breeds into the AKC family,” said AKC
spokesperson Gina DiNardo. “Both breeds make wonderful companions for the right family. If a
dog lover is interested in the American Hairless Terrier, Sloughi or any other AKC breed, we
encourage them to visit www.akc.org to learn more about the breed and determine if they’re a fit
for their lifestyle.”
Joining the Terrier group, the American Hairless Terrier is a small to
medium sized, active terrier. Ancestors of the breed were bred to hunt rats
and other vermin, and today the breed excels in many AKC dog sports. The
breed comes in both a hairless and coated variety, although the coated
dogs still carry the hairless gene. The AHT is well known for its propensity
for fewer allergic reactions than other breeds, allowing them into homes of
many allergy sufferers. The breed is energetic, alert, curious and intelligent.
For more information, visit http://www.ahtca.info/.
Joining the Hound group, the Sloughi is a medium-sized, smooth-coated,
athletic sighthound. An ancient breed, it is treasured in North Africa for its
hunting skills, speed, agility, and endurance over long distances. The
breed is noble and somewhat reserved, with a gentle, melancholy
expression. The breed must be exercised on leash or in a large fenced
area since it will run after anything that catches its fancy. Its smooth coat
requires a weekly brushing. For more information, visit http://sloughiinternational.
com/.
Both breeds became eligible to compete in their respective AKC groups on January 1, 2016.
To become an AKC recognized breed there must be a minimum number of dogs geographically
distributed throughout the U.S., as well as an established breed club of responsible owners and
breeders. Breeds working towards full recognition are recorded in AKC’s Foundation Stock
Service® (FSS®). Additional information on the process can be found at akc.org.
Hi-res images are available for download HERE.
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About the American Kennel Club
Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization which maintains the largest
registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The
AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and
breeding for type and function. Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its
affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine
health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog
ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules
and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure
coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the
AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the
Dog. For more information, visit www.akc.org.
AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and
logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.
Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers

FIVE HEROIC DOGS HONORED WITH AKC® HUMANE FUND AWARDS FOR CANINE EXCELLENCE (ACE)

New York, NY – The AKC® Humane Fund has announced the winners of the 16th annual AKC Humane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence (ACE). These awards commemorate five loyal, hard-working dogs that have significantly impacted the lives of their owners and people in their communities.

One award is presented in each of the following five categories: Uniformed Service K-9, Service, Therapy, Search and Rescue and Exemplary Companion dog. This year’s winners include a Military Working Dog that protects Presidents, a Great Dane that helps his young owner walk, a therapy dog that comforts military members and their loved ones, a human remains detection dog that brings closure to families and a show dog that serves as an ambassador for purebred dogs.

“Whether they serve as uniformed service, search and rescue, therapy, service, or exemplary companion dogs, each ACE nomination we receive is a testimony to the loyalty, devotion and strength dogs give to us,” said AKC Spokesperson Gina DiNardo. “Each dog’s devotion to their work and the impact they make in their community is an inspiration to dog lovers everywhere.”

All of the ACE recipients will receive $1,000 to be awarded to a pet-related charity of their choice, a one year pet insurance policy from Pet Partners, Inc. and an engraved sterling silver medallion to be presented at the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship in Orlando, Florida on Saturday and Sunday, December 12-13, 2015.

This year’s ACE winners are:

 

Uniformed Service K-9: “Pablo,” a Belgian Malinois handled by Greg Madrid of Albany, Georgia

“K9 Pablo” is a nine-year-old Belgian Malinois Military Working Dog (MWD), who is a certified PEDD (Patrol/Explosive Detection Dog) by the US Air Force, and is assigned to the Marine Corps Police Department in Albany, Georgia. Pablo regularly serves on Secret Service details for visiting dignitaries. In the past year, Pablo has provided protection for President Obama, Vice President Biden, Former President Clinton and Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Pablo also regularly attends Sunday morning church service at Maranatha Baptist Church in Plains, Georgia to help protect Former President Carter while he teaches Bible Study. Pablo participates in nearly every career day at the local schools, and many non-profit and charity events in his local community.

Service Dog: “George,” a Great Dane owned by Rachel Burton of Woburn, Massachusetts

“George” comes from the Service Dog Project, which trains dogs to help the mobility impaired. The Great Dane was paired with Bella, a 10-year-old girl with a rare genetic disorder called Morquio Syndrome. This disorder makes mobility exceptionally difficult and requires Bella to undergo many operations. Before she met George, Bella used a wheelchair or crutches to move around, but George has given Bella the strength and determination to walk and take part in activities she otherwise would not have been able to do. George and Bella have an inseparable bond and he will do anything for her. He has helped her gain confidence, independence and happiness.

Therapy Dog: “Wynd,” a Rottweiler owned by Renice Zimmerman of Yorktown, Virginia

For her owner Renice, “Wynd” is an once-in-a-lifetime therapy dog. Wynd has served on the therapy dog team for military surviving family members at The Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) National Seminar in DC for the past three Memorial Days and has volunteered at the Survivor Outreach Service booth at military events many times. Wynd is also a regular at the Hampton Veterans Hospital Domiciliary program, interacting and working closely with veterans with PTSD and substance abuse, and visits at the assisted living center at the VA hospital as well. During the school year, Wynd visits Suffolk Humane Society's BARKS reading program, encouraging a love of reading and helping many kids overcome their fear of dogs.

Search and Rescue Dog: “Ty,” a German Shepherd Dog handled by Melissa Frye of Southport, Florida

“Ty,” officially known as K-9 Ty Ty Road RN CGC, is an eight-year-old German Shepherd Dog trained in human remains detection. Over the span of his six year career, Ty has become the go-to K-9 in his department for recovery searches, helping to bring closure to families that have lost loved ones. He has been deployed on over 60 missions with great success, particularly in his specialty of water recovery. Ty is also cross-trained for live find search and disaster work, and serves as the Bay County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescuepublic relations dog. He’s a natural with all ages and eats up the attention he gets after putting on demonstrations.

Exemplary Companion Dog: “Mufasa,” a Bernese Mountain Dog owned by Kristen and Robin Greenwood of Bel Air, Maryland

“Mufasa,” who won Best of Breed at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 2014, is as an ambassador to his breed, purebred dogs and the American Kennel Club. This Bernese Mountain Dog greets visitors to his owners’ dog wash business (where he has a regular fan club) and his presence alone helps the local community to learn about AKC and responsible breeders. As a well-trained, excellent example of his breed, Mufasa helps to open the lines of communication about responsible breeders, and how these breeders are great ways to add a healthy and happy dog to the family. While some may have negative impressions of the dog show world and the life of an AKC show dog, Mufasa shows them that most “show dogs” are first and foremost well-loved family companions.

Read more about all of the ACE Award winners here.

Click here to view and download imagery of the 2015 AKC Humane Fund ACE recipients.

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The AKC Humane Fund, Inc. unites animal lovers in promoting the joy and value of responsible pet ownership through education, outreach and grant-making. It’s the only public charity that directly supports pets in domestic violence shelters. The Fund also offers Parent Club Breed Rescue grants to dog clubs rescuing and re-homing unwanted dogs and scholarships to reward students pursuing professions that strengthen the human-animal bond. The AKC Humane Fund’s Awards for Canine Excellence are given each year to promote the important role dogs play in our lives. Contributions to the AKC Humane Fund are fully tax deductible as allowed by law under Section 501(c)(3) of the IRS Code. For more information, visit www.akchumanefund.org.

The American Kennel Club, founded in 1884, is a not-for-profit organization which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 20,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Companion Animal Recovery and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

To become a fan of the AKC on Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com/americankennelclub. To follow the AKC on Twitter, go to http://www.twitter.com/akcdoglovers.

RALEIGH, N.C. (September 10, 2014) – Susan M. Lilly, Certified Fund Raising Professional (CFRE), has been appointed CEO of the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF). Founded in 1995, CHF is the leading organization devoted solely to canine health research, having funded more than $40 million in worthy scientific research and education to help dogs and their owners lead longer, healthier lives.

Ms. Lilly will oversee CHF operations at its headquarters in Raleigh, NC, supervising day-to-day activities, grant administration, financial management, and development. She succeeds Terry T. Warren, PhD, JD, who retired in June after six years in the position.

A native of Michigan, Ms. Lilly boasts a strong fundraising background. After holding development positions at Central Michigan University, she served as Director of Development at Michigan State University and, most recently, was Executive Director of the North Carolina State University Veterinary Health Foundation.

In announcing Ms. Lilly’s appointment, Dr. A. Duane Butherus, AKC Canine Health Foundation Board Chairman said, "She has proven herself to be an extremely productive fundraiser, able to connect the scientific community with pet-loving donors and to create an outstanding environment of philanthropy. CHF welcomes her expertise and enthusiastic approach as we strive to continue to enhance our outstanding programs."

As Ms. Lilly noted, “CHF has already instituted a valuable, international program of support for canine health. I look forward to building on this history and growing initiatives to further our exceptional mission. When we help our pets, we also enrich our own lives.”

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About CHF

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs live longer, healthier lives by funding research that helps prevent, treat, and cure canine disease. Established in 1995, CHF’s mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding sound, scientific research and supporting the dissemination of canine health information. Through the generous support of the American Kennel Club, Nestlé Purina PetCare, Zoetis (formerly Pfizer Animal Health), dog clubs, and dog owners worldwide, CHF has dedicated more than $40 million to canine health research projects and education programs. Visit CHF online at http://www.akcchf.org/ for more information.

 

Pat Santi, has been a DWAA member for 25 years and secretary for over 17 years. Author, columnist

lecturer, and animal behaviorist for over 40 years. Breeder, owner, handler for 45 years and AKC Breeder of

Merit. I am a registered nurse by profession but animals, especially dogs, been an essential part of my life since childhood:  As.

secretary, I enjoy working for and with the members.

News Release
For Immediate Release

AKC Canine Health Foundation Announces Continued Funding for Research into Health Implications of Early Spay and Neuter in Dogs

RALEIGH, N.C. (January 30, 2014) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is pleased to announce additional funding for continuing research on the health implications of early spay and neuter in dogs. The funding was awarded to Dr. Benjamin L. Hart of the University of California, Davis to expand his earlier work and consider breed differences in vulnerability to joint disorders and risks of various cancers after early or late spay/neuter.

Last year, Dr. Hart and a team of researchers published their phase one findings, “Neutering Dogs: Effects on Joint Disorders and Cancers in Golden Retrievers,” also funded by CHF, in the prominent, open access journal PLOS One, suggesting that veterinarians should be more cautious about the age at which they spay and neuter in order to protect the overall health of dogs. Currently, most dogs in the United States are spayed or neutered prior to maturity. Dr. Hart’s first phase of research looked at incidence of cancer diagnoses and joint problems in one breed -- Golden Retrievers -- by neuter status: early (before 12 months old), late (12 months or older), and intact. Consistent with previous studies on the topic, the results showed increased likelihood of hemangiosarcoma, lymphoma, mast cell tumors, and canine cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture in neutered dogs.

Phase two of Dr. Hart’s research will include: Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherd Dogs and Dachshunds. Rottweilers, Chihuahuas, Standard Poodles and Miniature Poodles will be included if resources and patient data are available. The expectation is that by the inclusion of multiple breeds in phase two, Dr. Hart will be able to develop a generalized understanding of the impact of early spay and neuter on disease risk in dogs. This in turn will enable veterinarians and breeders to make data-driven recommendations regarding timing of spay/neuter procedures to reduce the risk of development of multiple devastating diseases.

“Dr. Hart’s landmark study was the first to provide evidence for when to spay or neuter dogs,” said Dr. Shila Nordone, Chief Scientific Officer for the AKC Canine Health Foundation. “We are pleased to help fund Dr. Hart’s work and we hope that the additional findings through phase two will assist the veterinary community as they assess recommendations on when to spay or neuter and how the timing of these procedures may impact the health of dogs.”

According to Nordone, “We believe that the impact of Dr. Hart’s research will be immediate and broad. CCL, for example, is a disease that is painful, debilitating, and costs dog owners $1 billion annually to treat. The AKC Canine Health Foundation is committed to funding research, like Dr. Hart’s study, that can lead to evidence-based health recommendations. Armed with prudent guidelines for when to spay and neuter dogs we will have a significant impact on the quality of life for dogs.”

CHF is a non-profit organization dedicated to funding research to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Visit CHF online at http://www.akcchf.org/ for more information about the Foundation. Like CHF on Facebook, follow CHF on Twitter @CanineHealthFnd, or connect with CHF on LinkedIn.



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About CHF

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs live longer, healthier lives by funding research that helps prevent, treat, and cure canine disease. Established in 1995, CHF’s mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding sound, scientific research and supporting the dissemination of canine health information. Through the generous support of the American Kennel Club, Nestlé Purina PetCare, Zoetis (formerly Pfizer Animal Health), dog clubs, and dog owners worldwide, CHF has dedicated more than $40 million to canine health research projects and education programs. Visit CHF online at http://www.akcchf.org/ for more information.

News Release
For Immediate Release

AKC Canine Health Foundation Receives 4-Star Rating From Charity Navigator 

RALEIGH, N.C. (January 14, 2014) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation is pleased to announce it has earned a 4-star rating from Charity Navigator. Charity Navigator, America’s largest independent charity evaluator, bases their evaluation on sound fiscal management practices and a commitment to accountability and transparency. Receiving four out of a possible four stars indicates that the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) adheres to sound governance, while consistently executing its mission in a fiscally responsible way.

According to Charity Navigator, only a quarter of the charities it evaluates have received its highest 4-star rating. Since its first review 12 years ago, CHF has received the 4-star rating eight different times.

Since 1995, CHF has funded over $40 million for research and educational programs to prevent, treat, and cure canine disease. With the support of its donors, CHF has funded research that has led to improved diagnosis of canine diseases, development of more effective treatments, and the identification of disease prevention strategies. In 2013 CHF launched two major initiatives to fight gastric dilatation (GDV or bloat) and canine cancer, in addition to advancing research on more than a dozen other conditions that affect the lives of all dogs.

“We are honored to receive Charity Navigator’s highest rating,” said Terry T. Warren, CHF CEO and General Counsel. “This distinction reflects our accountability to all our constituencies and our commitment to our mission: helping all dogs live longer, healthier lives.”

Forbes, Business Week, and Kiplinger’s Financial Magazine have all profiled Charity Navigator’s unique method of applying data-driven analysis to the charitable sector. Receiving four stars indicates the charity has demonstrated sound fiscal management and accountability, a commitment to openness, and shows long-term financial health.  CHF is pleased to have earned an overall rating of 60.74 on a scale of 0 – 70.

To learn more about CHF and its commitment to the health of all dogs, visit http://www.akcchf.org/. To see the AKC Canine Health Foundation rating visit Charity Navigator.

CHF is a non-profit organization dedicated to funding research to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Visit CHF online at http://www.akcchf.org/ for more information about the Foundation. Like CHF on Facebook, follow CHF on Twitter @CanineHealthFnd, or connect with CHF on LinkedIn.

# # #

About CHF
The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs live longer, healthier lives by funding research that helps prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Established in 1995, CHF’s mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding sound scientific research and supporting the dissemination of canine health information. Through the generous support of the American Kennel Club, Nestlé Purina PetCare, Zoetis (formerly Pfizer Animal Health), dog clubs and dog owners worldwide, CHF has dedicated more than $40 million to canine health research projects and education programs. Visit CHF online at http://www.akcchf.org/ for more information.

"What position if any do you think AKC should take in the growing illegal use of people saying a dog is a service dog ? when in all too many cases they are not?"

Here is my reply. It's a little long, not sure if/how they will use it. I am anxious to see the other responses, too.

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The AKC should begin by lobbying the government agency responsible for ADA enforcement and encourage them to create a system that can provide proper identification and authorization for legitimate service dogs. I know and appreciate the challenges with that, but it can not go on the way that it is.

Separately or additionally, the ADA needs to clarify the rules and principles and issues pertaining to service dogs, and after it does, the AKC can help get that information out. This would include explaining the difference between service dogs (they have rights of access) and therapy dogs (they do not).

Next, the AKC can help the government shut down these bogus websites that offer service dog vests and IDs in exchange for a couple of dog treat box tops and a few bucks.

The AKC can help educate the people who work at the airport ticket counters and security checkpoints as to what might be happening. Let's emphasize sensitivity for legitimate service dogs and their humans, but let's weed out the base stealers.

The AKC can create an internal campaign discouraging dog show people from scamming their way into airplanes (a felony, by the way) to transport a dog to a dog show. Make everyone aware that this is a crime, that it is immoral and unethical, that it is an act that jeopardizes service dogs and their human partners, and that it does not reflect well on our sport and the people in it at a time that we need all the friends we can get. Let's talk about what service dogs mean to their people and that jeopardizing their work jeopardizes the safety, health, well-being and daily functionality of their humans. Building awareness about this can create some peer pressure, perhaps, and make someone think twice about getting on that airplane under phony premises.

Next, the AKC should work with the airlines to encourage them to provide realistic fees, services and safety for carrying our dogs.

Does it really have to come to this? Do we need to suggest that someone be stationed in the airport with a camera on dog show weekends? Flying your dog as a service dog when it is not a service dog is a disgusting practice. I know all the reasons that people use to justify it, and I don't dispute them. But to have that result in bringing your dog (or your client's dog) on an airplane as a service dog can not be tolerated. By the way, I put something on my Facebook page recently about this topic, and had a response that I have never experienced before, both in volume and in stridency. This does not reflect well on the dog show world.

The AKC mantra is that we are the dog's champion, and that "we" includes all of us in the sport and those dogs that we champion include service dogs.

And one more thing: please, if you are among those dog show people doing this, do not show up on one of my flights.

David Frei

Also see this story: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/they_re_licked_H9js6NfMXjSAbkkCYu97NI

AKC Canine Health Foundation-funded research offers interesting insight into the health implications of early spay and neuter in dogs.


RALEIGH, N.C. (February 25, 2013) – Recent results from research funded by the AKC Canine Health Foundation have the potential to significantly impact recommendations for spaying and neutering dogs in the United States. Most dogs in the United States are spayed or neutered, and for years the procedures have been completed prior to maturity. The study, published in the prominent, open access journal PLOS One, suggests that veterinarians should be more cautious about the age at which they spay and neuter in order to protect the overall health of dogs.

A team of researchers led by Dr. Benjamin L. Hart at the University of California, Davis has completed the most detailed study performed to date that evaluates incidence of cancer diagnoses and joint problems in one breed -- Golden Retrievers -- by neuter status: early (before 12 months old), late (12 months or older), and intact. Consistent with previous studies on the topic, the results showed increased likelihood of hemangiosarcoma, lymphoma, mast cell tumors, and canine cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture in neutered dogs.

The most profound observations were in hip dysplasia in male dogs when comparing early and late-neutering. The risk of development of hip dysplasia doubles, and disease occurs at a younger age in the early-neuter group compared to both the intact and late-neuter group. No occurrence of CCL disease was observed in intact male or intact female dogs, or in late-neutered females. In early-neutered dogs, the incidence of CCL was 5.1 percent in males and 7.7 percent in females, suggesting that neutering prior to sexual maturity significantly increases a dog’s risk of developing CCL disease. With respect to cancer, cases of lymphoma were 3-fold greater in the early-neutered males. Interestingly, incidence of mast cell tumors (male and female dogs) and hemangiosarcoma (female dogs only) were highest in the late-neuter group.

“Dr. Hart’s landmark study is the first to provide evidence for when to spay or neuter dogs. For years the veterinary community has been aware that early-spay and neuter may impact orthopedic health in dogs. Through a very detailed analysis and inclusion of body condition score as a risk factor, Dr. Hart was able to show that timing of spay and neuter does indeed have health implications,” said Dr. Shila Nordone, Chief Scientific Officer for the AKC Canine Health Foundation.

“CCL disease is painful, debilitating, and costs dog owners $1 billion annually to treat. The AKC Canine Health Foundation is committed to funding research, like Dr. Hart’s study, that can lead to evidence-based health recommendations. Armed with prudent guidelines for when to spay and neuter dogs we will have a significant impact on the quality of life for dogs,” continued Dr. Nordone.

Importantly, the task at hand is now to determine if the observations in this study are indeed true across all breeds and mixed breeds of dogs. Dr. Hart is interested in continuing his work by studying Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherd Dogs, and Dachshunds. Additionally, gaps in knowledge continue to exist concerning the complex relationship between sex hormones and cancer.

Last summer the AKC Canine Health Foundation released a podcast interview with Dr. Hart on his early-spay and neuter research as part of a series dedicated to the health of the canine athlete. To listen to the podcast visit www.akcchf.org/canineathlete

The publication “Neutering Dogs: Effects on Joint Disorders and Cancers in Golden Retrievers” is available online through the open access journal PLOS One. The work was funded by the AKC Canine Health Foundation with sponsorship from the Golden Retriever Foundation, Schooley's Mountain Kennel Club, the Siberian Husky Club of America, and the Vizsla Club of America Welfare Foundation.

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About CHF
The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs live longer, healthier lives by funding research that helps prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Established in 1995, CHF’s mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding sound, scientific research and supporting the dissemination of canine health information. Through the generous support of the American Kennel Club, Nestlé Purina PetCare, Zoetis, dog clubs and dog owners worldwide, CHF has dedicated more than $35 million to canine health research projects and education programs. Visit CHF online at www.akcchf.org for more information.

RALEIGH, N.C. (February 15, 2013) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation is proud to announce the achievement of a 4-star rating from Charity Navigator, America’s largest independent charity evaluator. This designation is bestowed on charities that adhere to the highest standards of fiscal management, accountability, and transparency.

Receiving four out of a possible four stars places the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) in an elite group of charitable organizations that demonstrate a superior commitment to sound governance, quantifiable results, and fiscal responsibility. “We take our mission very seriously and the Charity Navigator 4-star rating attests to the critical importance we place on being responsible stewards of the donations we receive,” said Dr. Terry Warren, CHF CEO and General Counsel. According to Charity Navigator only a quarter of the charities it evaluates have received its highest 4-star rating.

Since 1995, CHF has funded over $35 million for research and educational programs to prevent, treat, and cure canine disease. With the support of its donors, CHF has funded research that has led to improved diagnoses of canine diseases, development of more effective treatments, and the identification of disease prevention strategies.

Forbes, Business Week, and Kiplinger’s Financial Magazine have all profiled Charity Navigator’s unique method of applying data-driven analysis to the charitable sector. Their new Accountability and Transparency metrics demand even greater rigor, responsibility, and commitment to openness by the charitable organizations they evaluate. CHF is pleased to have earned an overall rating of 64.32 on a scale of 0 – 70.

“CHF understands that today’s donors make informed decisions based upon the financial soundness of a charitable organization. We are pleased that the Charity Navigator 4-star rating provides greater confidence for our donors, assuring that their hard-earned dollars will help dogs live longer, healthier lives,” said Warren.

To learn more about CHF and its commitment to the health of all dogs, visit www.akcchf.org. To see the AKC Canine Health Foundation rating visit Charity Navigator.

Like CHF at www.facebook.com/akccaninehealthfoundation or follow CHF on Twitter at @CanineHealthFnd.

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About CHF
The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs live longer, healthier lives by funding research that helps prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Established in 1995, CHF’s mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding sound, scientific research and supporting the dissemination of canine health information. Through the generous support of the American Kennel Club, Nestlé Purina PetCare, Zoetis, dog clubs and dog owners worldwide, CHF has dedicated more than $35 million to canine health research projects and education programs. Visit CHF online at www.akcchf.org for more information.

New York, NY – Results from a recent American Kennel Club (AKC®) survey reveal that when asked if they could have anyone as their Valentine, the majority of people (65%) would pick their dog!

There’s nothing better than coming home to your loving four-legged friend wagging his tail in excitement to see you, so it comes as no surprise that the number one canine quality respondents wished their human Valentines had is that they’re always happy to see them (40%). Following not far behind is “willing to go anywhere with you” at 25%, “loves snuggling” at 15%, and “doesn’t talk back” at 12%.

Some think it’s a myth, but puppy love really does exist! When your dog looks at you with those big eyes and you think he just wants some treats, think again,” said AKC Spokesperson Lisa Peterson. Dogs locking eyes with their owners can genuinely be a look of love and not just a form of begging. Dogs can develop this behavior with human companions they are very close with.”

Additional survey findings include:

  • 63% of respondents will spend Valentine’s day with their dogs.
  • Nearly 67% of people have bought their dogs a gift for the holiday. Among the most popular gifts were toys and treats.
  • 66% of respondents answered that they will be making Valentine’s Day special for their dog.
  • When asked what their dog would pick as the perfect way to spend the holiday together, 32% responded that their dog would choose to cuddle on the couch, followed closely by a stroll on the beach with 27%, and a trip to the dog park (16%).

To learn about responsible dog ownership, visit the AKC website at www.akc.org.

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Explanatory Notes:

The survey was conducted during a one week period in February 2013. Self-selecting methods were used in recruitment for this study. AKC does not guarantee that these statistics are scalable to the overall population. This data is for anecdotal purposes only.

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The American Kennel Club, founded in 1884, is a not-for-profit organization which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its nearly 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 20,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Companion Animal Recovery and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

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