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Talkin' Pets News

January 13, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Suzanne Topor - Livingston Animal & Avian Hospital

Producer - Zach Budin

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Dear Friend, Tippi Hedren, Actress, Author, Animal Advocate, Business Woman and Model will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 01/13/18 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away her book "Tippi" and update us on her preserve Shambala 

Gail Miller Bisher, Director of Communications for the Westminster Kennel Club will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 1/13/18 at 630pm EST to discuss TELEVISION COVERAGE EXPANDS AS ENTRIES SOAR AT THE 142nd ANNUAL WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW  

Prashant Khetan, Chief Executive Officer and General Counsel at Born Free USA, will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 01/13/18 at 720pm EST to discuss the upcoming show and topic on CNN this weekend, "Trophy"

News Release

RALEIGH, N.C. (December 11, 2017) To sustain future advancements in canine health, the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is pleased to announce and congratulate recipients of the 2018 AKC Canine Health Foundation Clinician-Scientist Fellowships:

Kathryn Dalton, VMD, MPH, is a PhD student in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Under the mentorship of Dr. Meghan Davis, Dr. Dalton is researching microbial communities and how they relate to human and canine health.

Shelby Gasson, DVM, is a PhD student in the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Texas A&M University. Dr. Gasson is this year's AKC Canine Health Foundation GCHP Hill Country's Let's Get Ready To Rumble “Rumble” Clinician-Scientist Fellow (akcchf.org/rumble). Under the mentorship of Dr. Brian Saunders, Dr. Gasson is researching the development of tissue engineering constructs for treatment of osteochondral defects.

Mariah Gentry, DVM, is a veterinary post-doctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. Under the mentorship of Dr. Margret Casal, Dr. Gentry is researching the heritability of renal dysplasia in Cairn Terriers, and aims to develop a DNA-based marker test so the disorder can be diagnosed at an early age.

Sita Withers, BVSc(Hons), is a PhD student at the University of California, Davis. Her mentor is Dr. Robert B. Rebhun. Dr. Withers is studying how naturally occurring canine cancers can contribute to the understanding of immunotherapeutics in dogs as well as people, with a focus on osteosarcoma. 

Established in 2013, the AKC Canine Health Foundation Clinician-Scientist Fellowship Program seeks to encourage and support the next generation of canine health researchers to sustain future advancements in canine and one health. According to Dr. Diane Brown, AKC Canine Health Foundation Chief Executive Officer, “This class of Fellows was selected from a highly competitive field of candidates. We look forward to their progress in advancing the health of dogs.”

Additional considerations for selection of awardees include conducting research in line with CHF’s mission, and with preference given to residents/graduate students at institutions which have demonstrated progress and success with current and prior CHF funding. Each fellowship includes $10,000 for research and $2,000 for presentation of results at a national scientific meeting.

For the latest portfolio of CHF research grants outlining active studies being supported for the health of dogs, please see the 2018 AKC Canine Health Foundation Research Grants Portfolio.

Visit www.akcchf.org/fellows to learn more about the 2018 Fellows and their canine health research projects. Please support the CHF Clinician-Scientist Fellowship program with a donation.

 

 

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About CHF

Since 1995, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

INAUGURAL WESTMINSTER GIVES BACK
DOG RESCUE AWARDS ANNOUNCED 
 
AKC Clubs Representing Bearded Collies, English Cocker Spaniels, and Great Pyrenees To Each Receive $5,000 in 2018 
 
New York, N.Y. - The Westminster Kennel Club announces its inaugural Westminster Gives Back Dog Rescue Awards of $5,000 each to American Kennel Club (AKC)-recognized national breed clubs engaged in dog rescue activities. The first three winners are the Bearded Collie Club of America, English Cocker Spaniel Club of America (ECSCA) Health and Welfare Organization, and Great Pyrenees Club of America. The three donations totaling $15,000 will be presented at Madison Square Garden during the 142nd Annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on Monday evening, Feb. 12, 2018.
 
Due to the overwhelming response in the number of applications from the national breeds clubs, Westminster has also selected three more organizations for the 2019 donations; the Bull Terrier Club of America, National Brussels Griffon Rescue, Inc., and the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Club (USA). Those donations will be given at the 143rd Annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 2019.
 
Westminster randomly selected the national breed clubs to receive the awards based on meeting eligibility requirements and the application deadline of Sept. 30, 2017. As part of its continuing effort to assist national breed club rescue organizations, Westminster is going to extend this program beyond 2019.The next application period will start in August 2019 for the 2020 and 2021 donations.
 
Each year, Westminster donates to a dog-related charity from the proceeds of its annual art contest's commemorative poster and notecards sales. For 2018, the donation increased to $15,000 to assist three national breed clubs in offsetting rescue-related expenses such as transportation, veterinary care, grooming, boarding, feeding, and training. In addition, these funds will assist the clubs in educating new owners about the joy of owning their specific breeds while finding new homes for purebred dogs. 
 
All events during Westminster Week are presented by Purina Pro Plan®.
 
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About The Westminster Kennel Club - The Westminster Kennel Club is America's oldest organization dedicated to the sport of purebred dogs.  Established in 1877, Westminster's influence has been felt for more than a century through its famous all-Breed, benched dog show held every year at New York City's Madison Square Garden. Today, America's dog show has expanded into Westminster Week which includes the Masters Agility Championship at Westminster and the Masters Obedience Championship at Westminster, both held at Piers 92/94. More than 3,000 dogs from the US and abroad make Westminster Week like no other. Westminster. There's only one. Visit us at: www.westminsterkennelclub.org or follow @WKCDOGS.
 
About the American Kennel Club - Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization, which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function. Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of theDog. For more information, visit http://www.akc.org.
 
AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.
 
Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers
 
About Purina Pro Plan - Purina Pro Plan is proud to be the food of choice for 10 of the past 11 Westminster Best in Show winners and 98 of the top 100 AKC All-Breed Champions.* With more than 400 on staff scientists, veterinarians and nutritionists, it is our goal to provide dogs with the nutrition they need to be their absolute best, to help keep them energetic and resilient, and to maintain an ideal body condition, healthy skin and a stunning coat. Because being the best he can be means something different for every dog, our wide range of dry and wet foods and snacks, sold exclusively at pet specialty stores, can be found in 80+ formulas across four specialized categories, formulated for a dog's unique needs. For more information, visit www.proplan.com or follow @ProPlan on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Vine or Google+. The brand is manufactured by Nestle Purina PetCare, which promotes responsible pet care, humane education, community involvement and the positive bond between people and their pets. A premiere global manufacturer of pet products, Nestle Purina PetCare is part of Swiss-based Nestle S.A., a global leader in nutrition, health and wellness.
*The handler or owner of these champions may have received Pro Plan dog food as Purina ambassadors.
 
 
WESTMINSTER. There's Only One.
 
 
 
 
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Raleigh, NC – Our hearts and prayers go out to the many people in Texas, Louisiana and surrounding areas that are in the path of Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath. The magnitude of the devastation from this storm is unimaginable and the American Kennel Club® (AKC®) and AKC Reunite are here to contribute to the relief. Two AKC Pet Disaster Relief trailers have been deployed in Dallas and Ft Worth, Texas to help evacuees from the storm and AKC Reunite will continue to help shelters caring for pets displaced by the storm.

“AKC Reunite continues to monitor the situation in Texas and Louisiana. We are committed to providing as much assistance as possible to those affected by this storm,” said Tom Sharp, AKC Reunite President and CEO. “Pets are part of the family and we understand how important it is to ensure their safety as well.” 

The Fort Worth AKC Pet Disaster Relief trailer has been deployed at the Fort Worth Wilkerson Facility emergency shelter, located at 5201 Ca Roberson Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76119. The deployment of this trailer allows people to safely evacuate with their pets instead of risking their lives because they do not have a safe, pet-friendly place to go. It houses supplies that create a safe, temporary home-base for at least 65 pets in the wake of a disaster. The essential, non-perishable AKC Pet Disaster Relief supplies are crucial, as many pet owners do not have the time to gather the necessary items to care for their pets during an emergency evacuation.

The Tri Cities/Cedar Hill AKC Pet Disaster Relief Trailer is deployed adjacent to the “Mega” Shelter set up in Dallas at the Kay Bailey Hutchinson Convention Center. This self-care animal shelter set up in the nearby parking garage so evacuees have close proximity to their pets. Efforts are being supported by the SPCA of Texas, the Dallas Animals Services, and the Dallas County Animal Response Team.

AKC Reunite has donated thousands of dollars to Austin Pets Alive shelter, Etosha Rescue, the SPCA of Brazoria County, among others. The organization has also purchased $2,600 worth of kennel runs for the Tri-Cities Animal Shelter and Dallas County Response Team to assist at the Dallas Mega Shelter.

Please refer to the AKC Reunite website for more updates on the storm and what the AKC and AKC Reunite are doing to contribute to the relief. You can also find pet-friendly emergency shelter locations, including those with AKC Pet Disaster Relief trailers. To donate to AKC Reunite, please click here.

 

New York, NYTo celebrate the dogs who do extraordinary things in the service of humankind, the AKC Humane FundSM is seeking YOUR nominations for its AKC Humane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence (ACE).  Nominations are now open and winners will be announced in fall 2017.  

Each year, the AKC Humane Fund pays tribute to five dedicated, hardworking dogs for making significant contributions to an individual or entire community.  Since its creation in 2000, 85 ACE awards have been presented to dogs of various breeds, including one mixed-breed dog, from states across the nation.  Former ACE recipients have included a police K-9 who uncovered the work of a serial killer and a family pet who fought for his life after saving a seven-year-old girl from a rattlesnake, among dozens of other incredible pups.

“There are countless dogs that improve the lives of individuals and communities across the nation each and every day,” said Gina DiNardo, American Kennel Club Executive Secretary and Director of the AKC Humane Fund.  “These remarkable canines touch the hearts of many and deserve to be recognized for their selfless acts.  We are proud to honor five of these canine heroes each year with an ACE Award.” 

One award is given in each of the following five categories:

Uniformed Service K-9

Eligibility: Full-time working K-9s in the realms of city, county, state, or federal law enforcement; the military; firefighting; customs and border patrol; emergency services.

Exemplary Companion

Eligibility: Dogs without formal training or certification that have nonetheless distinguished themselves in some way and have made a meaningful contribution to their owners or communities.

Search and Rescue

Eligibility: Dogs certified to assist in wilderness and urban tracking, natural disasters, mass casualty events and locating missing people.

Therapy

Eligibility: Certified therapy dogs working in hospitals, schools, disaster sites, war zones, and wherever else the affection of a good dog can provide comfort.

Service

Eligibility: Certified service dogs who enrich the lives of physically or mentally disabled owners. Including but not limited to guide dogs for the blind, seizure-alert dogs, hearing dogs, balance dogs.

**(Note: Nominees doing service or therapy work without certification are considered in the Exemplary Companion category.)

Honorees will receive an engraved sterling-silver medallion and an all-expenses-paid trip for dog and owner to Orlando, Florida, to be honored at the AKC National Championship presented by Royal Canin in December. A donation of $1,000 will also be made in each recipient’s name to the pet-related charity of their choice. The names of the five recipients will be added to the ACE plaque on permanent display in the AKC Humane Fund Library at AKC headquarters in New York City.

Anyone, including the dog’s owner or handler, may submit a nomination form.  Submissions for the AKC Humane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence for 2017 must include:

·         A non-returnable, original print or digital photograph of the dog. All digital photos must be larger than 1MB in size and a minimum of 300 dpi. The photo should feature solely the nominated dog.

·         A 500-word-or-less description of how the dog has demonstrated excellence.

·         Dog’s call name, breed, age and sex.

·         Owner’s/Nominator's name(s), address and phone number. E-mail address if available.

Nominations will be accepted through July 31, 2017 and should be submitted here, with a photo sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

For more information about the ACE awards or to download a nomination form visit the AKC Humane Fund website.

 

New York, N.Y. – The American Kennel Club is pleased to announce the launch of the AKC Trick Dog program. The program will include four levels allowing dogs with any amount of experience the ability to participate. Teaching their dog tricks is enjoyable for owners, mentally stimulating for their dogs and can take place at any time or place that fits their lifestyle.

“It is easy to see why trick training is becoming so popular,” said Dr. Mary Burch, AKC Canine Good Citizen and Trick Dog Director. “The primary characteristic of trick dog training is having fun. Tricks can be both entertaining and practical, such as teaching a dog ‘paws up’ for a therapy setting. Trick dog training makes a team out of the handler and dog. We hope this exciting new program will encourage more dogs and owners to become involved in training.”

All dogs (purebred and mixed breeds), can earn Trick Dog titles provided the dog is AKC-registered, enrolled with AKC Canine Partners, or enrolled in the Purebred Alternative Listing (PAL) program. The titles will be listed on the dog’s AKC record and will appear on pedigrees.

Trick titles can be awarded by AKC approved Canine Good Citizen Evaluators, and the AKC will also recognize trick titles earned through the Do More With Your Dog (DMWYD) organization.

“The AKC is proud to partner with DMWYD. Founded in 2005 by Kyra Sundance, DMWYD has introduced trick dog training to thousands of owners and their dogs,” said Doug Ljungren, Vice President of Sports and Events. “By providing basic training to our dogs, whether through CGC training, trick training or in preparation for AKC sports, we prepare our dogs to participate in more areas of our life. Together we encourage all owners to join the fun.”

To learn more about the AKC Trick Dog program and access the title application form, please visit www.akc.org/trick-dog.

The AKC will begin processing Trick Dog title applications on May 1, 2017.        

 

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About the American Kennel Club

Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization, which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.


Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers

 

New York, NY The American Kennel Club (AKC®), the world’s largest purebred dog registry and leading advocate for dogs, is honored to announce the first set of 2017 AKC Paw of Courage awards to recognize the working canines that put their lives on the line every day to keep our communities safe. This award specifically recognizes those who are serving or have served their departments honorably.

“These selfless canines prove their devotion time and time again,” said AKC Vice President Gina DiNardo. “They demonstrate loyalty, valor and honor in their careers and each of these dogs has made a substantial sacrifice in the line of duty. It is with great esteem that we honor these working dogs with the AKC Paw of Courage as an indication of our appreciation.”

Any working dog is eligible to receive the AKC Paw of Courage; the award is not specific to purebred dogs. To nominate a dog for the next set of Paw of Courage awards, click here. Recipients of the award, or their human partner, will receive a 2017 AKC Paw of Courage medal along with a certificate. In addition, the recipients will receive a photo and profile on akc.org.

The first set of 2017 AKC Paw of Courage recipients are:

K9 Bruno of Anaheim Police Department, CA

K9 Bruno, a seven-year-old German Shepherd Dog, served with the Anaheim Police Department for six years at the time of his injury. He was given an AKC Humane Fund Award for Canine Excellence (ACE) by the American Kennel Club in 2014 after being shot while assisting the SWAT team with a search. The bullet went through Bruno’s lower jaw and lodged in his chest, only about an inch from his heart. After the incident, Bruno retired from his K9 duties and lived at home with his partner, Officer R.J. Young. About two years later, K9 Bruno succumbed to complications from his initial injury.

Bruno was one of two dogs who trained to become part of the SWAT team. He graduated first in his class from the K9 academy and also won first place overall in narcotics during his first ever K9 competition. Bruno was credited with finding millions of dollars’ worth of narcotics and narcotic-related money. He was always full of energy and was well known around the department for disrupting briefings by chewing on his red toy. K9 Bruno was a cherished officer, partner and family companion and will be missed dearly by Officer Young and the Anaheim Police Department, as well as every one of the many lives he has touched.

K9 Mattis of the Alpharetta Police Department, GA

K9 Mattis, a three-year-old German Shepherd Dog, serves with the Alpharetta Police Department. In October of 2016, while handler, Officer Mark Tappan and K9 Mattis were in a foot pursuit, the suspect leapt off a 30-foot retaining wall and Mattis followed without hesitation, leading to his surrender. Mattis was checked for obvious injuries and was quickly on his way to respond to the next call with Officer Tappan. They were able to track down and apprehend the second suspect shortly before Mattis collapsed from internal injuries from the earlier fall. He was rushed to the emergency vet where he was treated for a lacerated liver and a contusion of his right lung.

Mattis has since made a full recovery and returned to active duty. In his short time with the department, Mattis has contributed to over 100 arrests and has assisted in removing countless amounts of narcotics from the streets. Additionally, he has performed several demonstrations for church groups, schools and various other community groups, often surrounded by the children of the community. Officer Tappan describes K9 Mattis as a very special blend of tenacious working dog and friendly family pet. Mattis’ lack of hesitation jumping off the wall demonstrates his dedication and loyalty to his work. The sacrifice Mattis made that day to protect his community is truly appreciated by Officer Tappan, the Alpharetta Police Department and the community he serves.

K9 Jardo of the Boise Police Department, ID

K9 Jardo was a six-year-old Belgian Malinois of the Boise Police Department in Idaho when he was shot in the line of duty while confronting an armed suspect. Jardo was rushed to WestVet Animal Emergency and Specialty Center with at least one gunshot wound to the chest. He underwent surgery and two dogs, both pets of staff members at WestVet, donated blood to Jardo, giving him a life-saving transfusion. The surgery and transfusion were successful and Jardo was expected to make a full recovery. However, about a week later, he succumbed to his injuries.

K9 Jardo was trained to track and apprehend dangerous criminals, find evidence relating to crimes and locate street drugs. He successfully apprehended a dangerous gang member in his very first week on patrol. When he was not on duty, Jardo enjoyed playing with his dog friends and swimming in the canal by his house. K9 Jardo made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty to protect his community. He will be missed dearly by his handler, Officer Shane Williams, as well as the entire Boise Police Department and each person he has touched throughout his life.

K9 Peydro of the Woodland Police Department, CA

K9 Peydro is a three-year-old German Shepherd Dog, handled by Officer Juan Barrera. He served the Woodland Police Department honorably for a little over a year. In May of 2016, Peydro was struck by a vehicle while he and Officer Barrera were in pursuit of a wanted man. K9 Peydro was immediately transported to a veterinary hospital and after a successful surgery and blood transfusion, he made a full recovery, but was medically retired in October of 2016.

The suspect involved in the incident later turned himself in to the Woodland Police Department. Peydro was a dual purpose police K9 trained in narcotics, apprehension, and article searching. He weighs about 80 lbs, but Officer Barrera and his family are convinced that he thinks he's a lap dog. When he’s not on duty, he loves to cuddle up on the couch and balance toys on his nose. Peydro’s sacrifice in the line of duty was an indication of his courage and commitment to his community. He is now enjoying his retired life with his family.

For downloadable images of the recipients, click here.

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About the American Kennel Club

Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization, which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function. Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog. For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers

News Release
For Immediate Release

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (February 27, 2017) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce that it has awarded the first research grant through the Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium (CBTC). The CBTC was launched at the National Institutes of Health by a group of clinicians and investigators in the fields of veterinary and human neuro-oncology, clinical trials, neuropathology, and drug development.

Participants in the CBTC evaluated the role that naturally occurring canine brain tumors could have in advancing comparative oncology aimed at improving outcomes for canine and human patients with brain cancer. The findings of the CBTC were published in a white paper, “Creation of an NCI comparative brain tumor consortium: informing the translation of new knowledge from canine to human brain tumor patients.” The AKC Canine Health Foundation, committed to this effort, has awarded the first research grant through this consortium, Clinical Trial of Procaspase-3 Activator (PAC-1) in Combination with Hydroxyurea for Treatment of Canine Meningioma, led by principal investigator, Dr. Timothy M. Fan, DVM, PhD from the University of Illinois.

“The National Cancer Institute is thrilled to partner with the academic community, with the generous support of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, to conduct the inaugural clinical trial of the Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium,” said Amy LeBlanc, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM (Oncology), Director, Comparative Oncology Program.  “In this effort we bring together unique and cutting-edge technology, knowledge and clinical expertise to evaluate a novel therapeutic and diagnostic approach to canine meningioma.”

Primary brain tumors are a significant cause of illness and death in pet dogs, with meningioma accounting for approximately half of the cases seen by veterinary neurologists and oncologists. Although surgery remains the best treatment for dogs with meningioma, some dogs are not good candidates for this approach based on their tumor size and/or location. Dogs also may experience tumor regrowth after surgery. In these situations, effective treatment options are limited. New treatments that are both safe and effective are needed for dogs with meningioma.

Dr. Fan and a team of investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Comparative Oncology Program and selected veterinary academic centers will work together using state-of-the art imaging and a novel therapeutic approach for dogs with meningioma that are good surgical candidates. Dogs enrolled in this study will receive an investigational combination of chemotherapy agents (PAC-1 + hydroxyurea) and will be monitored with magnetic resonance and non-invasive molecular imaging techniques. Dogs will then undergo tumor removal to further their treatment. This approach to a new therapy for dogs has the potential to also translate to treatments for humans with advanced, locally-recurrent, and/or non-resectable meningioma.

According to Dr. Fan, "The National Cancer Institute’s Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium, through the generous support of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, has a unique opportunity to investigate a combination of novel advanced imaging techniques in conjunction with new therapies for dogs with meningioma. It is hoped that the findings derived from this new study will generate important data on how canine meningioma can be monitored non-invasively with molecular imaging, and if combining cytotoxic agents with a procaspase-3 activating compound can produce measurable anticancer effects."

Dr. Diane Brown, CEO of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, and one of the co-authors of the original CBTC summary paper, says, “This first project is a way toward a future to advance care for dogs and humans who share environments, and diseases such as brain tumors. By working together through studies such as this one, we leverage the strengths of veterinary and human medicine and research to seek opportunities for new paths to cure diseases shared by both species.”

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

Talkin' Pets News - 2/18/17
Host - Jon Patch
Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo
Producer - Lexi Lapp
Network Producer - Quin McCarthy
Executive Producer - Bob Page
Special Guests - Diane Rose-Solomon author of "What To Expect When Adopting A Dog" will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 2/18/17 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away her book
David Frei the new voice of the Beverly Hills Dog Show will join Jon and Talkin' Pets to discuss this new dog show event on the west coast
Nick Townsend will be performing an acoustic version of the song "Glorious" from the new movie "Rock Dog" live from the Patch studios

Gail Miller Bisher is the director of communications for the Westminster Kennel Club.

Bisher has been a media professional for many years and has had life-long involvement in canine sport, getting her start in the sport in Junior Showmanship, where she once won second place at Westminster. She is an AKC-licensed conformation judge and a Canine Good Citizen evaluator.

"As the new ‘face' of the Westminster Kennel Club, I look forward to continuing a legacy of quality and prestige while increasing our brand’s presence and audience size," she said.

"It’s an honor to return to the Westminster in this capacity. It’s an exciting time of transition for this historic organization and I plan to do as any dog handler does: access, improve where needed, and practice teamwork. I believe in the leadership’s vision and I’m eager to start executing it."

To learn more, visit the Westminster Kennel Club website.

 

In 1876, the members of the Westminster Club, then primarily a shooting organization, commissioned one of its early officials, George deForest Grant, to send to England for a Pointer which the members could use for breeding purposes.

He received a photograph of a dog named Don which had won his bench championship in England, through show triumphs at Shifnal, Oswestry, Birmingham, Swansea and Llanelly in 1875, and at Newport and Carmarthen in 1876. Impressed with the pictures of the dog as much as with his show record, the members arranged to import him under the name of “Sensation,” Volume IV of the English Kennel Club Stud Book listing him as “Sensation (formerly Don).”

Sensation

Brought to this country, “Sensation” was promptly registered in the name of the Westminster Kennel Club in Volume I of the stud book of the National American Kennel Club, which subsequently became the American Kennel Club. His entry in that book as Number 1261 shows that he gained his American championship with victories at Baltimore in 1876 and at St. Louis, Boston and Baltimore in 1879. His show career, however, was limited since the primary object in his importation was to strengthen the breeding stock of the club’s members.

A handsome lemon and white dog, with a fine head and especially good body, “Sensation” did much for Pointer breeders in this country. Several artists did pictures of him and one of the head studies appeared on the Westminster catalog in 1878, the second all-breed show given by the club. Except for a gap between 1896 and 1903, “Sensation’s” head appeared on all subsequent catalogues of the Westminster Show through 1935.

In 1935, a steel engraving of “Sensation” was discovered in the collection of prints, engravings and paintings of the well-known sportsman, Harry D. Kirkover, of Camden, South Carolina and New York. He loaned the picture to the Westminster Club to permit its reproduction.

The engraving, by artist J. Wellstood, showed the whole dog, with a light lemon patch on its side, frozen in point. The artist had caught the magnificently bodied dog in marvelous detail. The muscles and even the veins of the legs stood out.

This became the new emblem of the club and appeared on the cover of the show catalog from 1936 through 1979. From 1980-1982, a head study of Sensation was selected once again for the cover, but in 1983 a foil embossed version of the full body engraving appeared on the cover and has been there ever since.

 

In 1877, New York was well on its way to becoming the world’s greatest city. This was the year that a group of sporting gentlemen decided that this would be a good time to hold a dog show in Manhattan. It didn’t take long before the Westminster Kennel Club, following the lead of its home town, would be on its way to becoming the world’s greatest dog show.

westmisterhotelWith its spectacular beginnings and extraordinary growth in the years to follow, the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show was quickly reflecting the growth and success of New York City. As the dog show grew every year, so did the Westminster Kennel Club’s position as the symbol of the purebred dog, with its influence being felt in show rings everywhere, and eventually in millions of television homes across the country. Westminster has become America’s Dog Show.

“Westminster gets its name from a long gone hotel in Manhattan. There, sporting gentlemen used to meet in the bar to drink and lie about their shooting accomplishments. Eventually they formed a club and bought a training area and kennel. They kept their dogs there and hired a trainer.

“They couldn’t agree on the name for their new club. But finally someone suggested that they name it after their favorite bar. The idea was unanimously selected, we imagine, with the hoisting of a dozen drinking arms.”
– Maxwell Riddle, from a newspaper story quoted in “The Dog Show, 125 Years of Westminster” by William Stifel

It was at one of those meetings that the members decided that they would stage a dog show so that they could compare their dogs in a setting away from the field. The First Annual New York Bench Show of Dogs, given under the auspices of the Westminster Kennel Club, was staged in 1877 at Gilmore’s Garden (the forerunner of Madison Square Garden) in New York City, drawing an entry of 1,201 dogs.

The show was such a hit that it was extended to four days from its originally-scheduled three, and drew this coverage from “Forest and Stream” magazine:

“To say that the dog show held in the city last week was a success would but poorly convey an idea of what the result really was. It was a magnificent triumph for the dogs and for the projectors of the show. We question if on any previous occasion has there ever assembled in this city such a number of people at one time, and representing as much of the culture, wealth and fashion of the town.”

rings1877To fully grasp the place in history of the Westminster Kennel Club and its famed annual dog show at Madison Square Garden, consider this:

Westminster pre-dates the invention of the light bulb, the automobile, and the zipper; the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Washington Monument; and manned air flight and the establishment of the World Series. Since Westminster held its first show 127 years ago, there have been 26 men elected president and 12 states have joined the union.

The dog show has outlasted three previous versions of Madison Square Garden, and is currently being staged in MSG IV. It is one of only four events to be held in all four “Gardens.”
The dog show has survived power outages, snowstorms, a national depression, two World Wars and a tugboat strike that threatened to shut down the city, in the process becoming the second longest continuously held sporting event in the country. Only the Kentucky Derby has been staged longer – but by just one year.

Westminster even pre-dates the establishment of the governing body of the sport, the American Kennel Club, by seven years. In fact, in 1877, members of Westminster and members of the Kennel Club of Philadelphia had together adopted a set of show rules and regulations and established a Board of Appeals to oversee these rules. This was the precursor of the American Kennel Club, which was finally created in 1884.

As one might imagine, the history of the club and its show is rich and colorful.

In the early Westminster years, some interesting names showed up in the catalogs. In the first show, there were two Staghounds listed as being from the late General George Custer’s pack, and two Deerhounds that had been bred by the Queen of England. In 1889, the Czar of Russia is listed as the breeder of a Siberian Wolfhound entered, and the following year, one of the entries is a Russian Wolfhound whose listed owner was the Emperor of Germany.

Philanthropist J. P. Morgan made the first of his many appearances at Westminster with his Collies in 1893. Famous American journalist Nelly Bly entered her Maltese at Westminster in 1894, some four years after she made a record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes, racing the record of Phineas Fogg in Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days.

warrenremedyThe most-coveted award in the dog show world, Best In Show at Westminster, was given for the first time in 1907. That year, and for the next two years as well, it went to a Smooth Fox Terrier bitch named Ch. Warren Remedy. She remains the only dog ever to win three times.

Six other dogs have won Best In Show twice, the most recent being the English Springer Spaniel, Ch. Chinoe’s Adamant James in 1971 and 1972.

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