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Displaying items by tag: soldiers

Movie review written by Jon Patch with 2.5 out of 4 paws

They Shall Not Grow Old

Warner Bros. Pictures, House Productions, Trustees of the Imperial War Museum, London and WingNut Films present an R rated, 99 minute, Documentary, History, War film directed by Peter Jackson with a theatre release date of February 1, 2019.

Review written by Jon Patch with 3.5 out of 4 paws

12 Strong

Warner Bros. Pictures, Alcon Entertainment, Jerry Bruckheimer Films and Black Label Media presents a 130 minute, R rated, Action, Drama, History film directed by Nicolai Fuglsig, written by Ted Tally and Peter Craig with a theatre release date of January 19, 2018.

Review written by Jon Patch with 3.5 out of 4 paws

Hacksaw Ridge

AI-Film, Argent Pictures, Cross Creek Pictures, Lionsgate, Cosmos Filmed Entertainment, Demarest Media and Summit Entertainment present an R rated, based on a true story, 131 minute, Biography, Drama, Romance, directed by Mel Gibson, screenplay by Andrew Knight and Robert Schenkkan with a theater release date of November 4, 2016.

Review written by Jon Patch with 3.5 paws out of 4

13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

Paramount Pictures, 3 Arts Entertainment, Dune Films and Latina Pictures present a 144 minute, R rated, Action, Drama, Thriller, directed by Michael Bay, screenplay by Chuck Hogan and book by Mitchell Zuckoff with a theater release date of January 15, 2016.

Enjoy the fun photos and heartwarming stories of WWII's American soldiers and their dogs.  
One of the most effective forms of American propaganda during World War II was the morale-boosting dog (or buddy) photo. The photos reassured folks back home that despite the horrors of the war, their boys were still boys.  
Buddies: Heartwarming Photos of GIs and Their Dogs in World War II is chock-full of photos of warriors and their pups, along with stories of the dogs and their service in Europe and the Pacific. This new edition includes even more photos and tales of furry friends on the front.  
Max, a Boxer, was a full-fledged paratrooper in the Army who earned his wings after five jumps. Skippy, a pit bull pointer, was such a big part of his bomber crew that members painted him on their B-17 Flying Fortress and fitted him with a custom oxygen mask. Don't forget the salty dogs of the navy such as Hobo, who followed his pals when they took a beach. "Private" Chico, a marine mutt, promptly dug his own foxhole after landing on Bougainville. The US Coast Guard counted many puppies who were born on ships among their furriest, and possibly most beloved, sailors. Pete the Pooch, a tenacious terrier, even helped bring in mooring lines!  
Although dogs were the most popular mascot, a few chickens, crows, cats, goats, and monkeys made their way into the hearts of our fighting men. Get the full story on these companions too!  
ABOUT THE AUTHOR L. Douglas Keeney is a military historian and researcher and the author of 15 Minutes: General Curtis Lemay and the Countdown to Nuclear Annihilation. He is the cofounder of The Military Channel on which he hosted a series called On Target. He has since appeared on the Discovery Channel; CBS; and the Learning Channel and is the author of ten books of military history.  
ABOUT ZENITH PRESS Zenith Press publishes historical non-fiction in narrative illustrated and graphic formats.  Building on a core of 19th and 20th century military history in America, Zenith also publishes titles on the history of aviation, technology  and science, and also in selected areas of cultural and social history - all with a distinctly American angle.  From a narrative of a famed American WWII flying squadron to an illustrated celebration of NASA's famed Space Shuttle program to a cultural history of moonshine in the 19th and 20th centuries, Zenith books are engaging American stories with a firm historical foundation. 

2 Wolves Films, eOne Entertainment and Strings of Films present a 112 minute, R rated, Music, Drama, directed by Daniel Duran and written by Oscar Orlando Torres with a theater release date of May 8, 2015.

When things get tough, it’s often the simple things that make the greatest impact on our lives.
     Kathy Smith knows that only too well. She lost her husband Dennis to the effects of Agent Orange exposure he received while serving his country in Viet Nam. Dennis never complained, instead he was proud to have served his country.
     After losing Dennis, Kathy wanted to make his life and his service to our nation meaningful so she founded a non-profit called Dog Tag Heroes to help veterans and their families with quality of life issues, which other organizations often overlook.
     Kathy realizes the importance of helping them get back into the mainstream of society and has used the "simple things" to help that happen. Something as practical as taking care of a pet while the veteran is in the hospital or making sure the person has a Christmas tree can mean a great deal. Other examples may include providing home furnishings, assisting with their short term financial needs, or providing a bicycle to make it possible for them to get to work, a bus station, a doctor’s appointment or just get to the store.
     Because of Kathy's personal involvement, she has single-handedly impacted more lives than veteran organizations that are much larger. What makes her efforts even more remarkable is that she has been performing her generous acts while taking intense chemo-therapy for pancreatic cancer. She is still battling the cancer, although it is currently in remission.
     Despite her personal challenges, Kathy remains focused on her mission to help our veterans by opening a thrift store called Veterans Exchange Store. This will enable Dog Tag Heroes to be self-sustaining while providing expanded services to our veterans and their families.
     Dog Tag Heroes needs to raise $175,000 dollars to make it happen. Your generosity will make it possible to keep Kathy’s dream alive to help America's veterans for years to come.

Dog Tag Hehoes - to donate:  727-577-5455 or link to PayPal on Facebook:  www.facebook.com/dogtagheroes

 

SMITHTOWN, NY – (April 6, 2015) – Most people are aware that we have soldiers overseas in Afghanistan. But what most are not usually aware of is that many times they become attached to dogs that they find roaming in the area. For some, it’s the bond they create with those new pets that keep them feeling happy and hopeful. Yet when their tour of duty is over and it’s time to go back home to the U.S., they find themselves having to break that bond and leave the dog behind. Guardians of Rescue, an international animal rescue organization, works to change that by reuniting soldiers with the dogs they had to leave behind.

"Through our No Buddy Left Behind Program, we have helped numerous soldiers to be reunited with the dogs they were caring for in Afghanistan,” stated Robert Misseri, founder and president of Guardians of Rescue. “It’s the least we can do for these soldiers, who miss the dogs and worry about their fate. But we can’t do it alone; we need the public’s help in order to make it a successful mission.”

There are costs involved in bringing the dogs back to the U.S. from the Middle East. This expense is one reason that Guardians of Rescue reaches out to the public for donations in order to help make it possible. The group is working with the only Afghanistan-based animal shelter, Nowzad, to make the mission possible and successful. The dogs will be flown into John F. Kennedy International Airport at the end of April, and then will be transported on to Portland, Ore., where they will be reunited with the soldiers they were with in Afghanistan.

The dogs being reunited were found and rescued by a couple of U.S. Army soldiers. When they spotted the mom she had four puppies and a wounded paw, and they saw the way other stray dogs had been mistreated in the area. They decided to help nurse the wounded leg back to health, and went on to care for and bond with the mother and her puppies. The platoon medic will be adopting her, while another soldier takes two of the puppies, and a third soldier has expressed interest in another one of the puppies.

“These soldiers have given us so much, the least we can do it is reunite them with these dogs they bonded with,” said Dori Scofield, vice president of Guardians of Rescue. “Every little bit helps, and it all adds up to meaning so much for them and the dogs. Together we can save them!”

The cost to bring the dogs back to America and deliver them to the soldiers is estimated at $6,000. Guardians of Rescue is seeking donations from the public to help with this mission. Those who would like to learn more and make a donation can do so by logging onto: http://guardiansofrescue.org/banners-view/no-buddy-left-behind/.

About Guardians of Rescue Based in New York, Guardians of Rescue is an organization whose mission is to protect the well being of all animals. They provide aid to animals in distress, including facilitating foster programs, rehabilitation, assisting other rescue groups, and providing support to families, both military and not, who need assistance due to economic factors. To learn more about Guardians of Rescue, visit the site at www.guardiansofrescue.org.

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Warner Bros. Pictures, Alcon Entertainment, Black Label Media, Imagine Entertainment and Blue Sky Films present a 110 minute, PG-13, based on true events drama directed by Philippe Falardeau and written by Margaret Nagle with a theater release date of October 3, 2014.

SMITHTOWN, NEW YORK (March 19, 2013) – Guardians of Rescue, an organization whose mission is to help animals, will be headed to Fort Bragg, N.C. on March 25, 2013, to pick up a group of rescued dogs. The group will be working with their Soldier-to-Soldier program to help place the dogs with veterans suffering from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as well as with other Soldiers. They will rescue the dogs from the Ft. Bragg Animal Shelter & Adoption Center, which is located on Ft. Bragg, home of more than 56,000 Soldiers.

“We are ready to help rescue these dogs and place them with as many veterans as we can, to assist with their therapy,” explains Robert Misseri, president of Guardians of Rescue. “We will place as many of the dogs as possible with vets, and beyond that will work to find good homes for the rest.”

PTSD is a condition among military veterans. It is a psychological condition that can arise after someone has experienced a traumatic event, such as being directly involved in combat. It is estimated that around 400,000 veterans currently suffer from PTSD. Animal therapy has proven to be beneficial in helping veterans overcome the condition. PTSD, according to the National Institutes of Health, changes the body’s response to stress. Some of its symptoms include flashbacks, upsetting dreams, feeling emotionally numb, hopelessness, memory problems, and avoiding doing things that were once enjoyed.

Guardians of Rescue has a program called “Soldier to Soldier,” where they pair up shelter dogs with veterans suffering from PTSD or other psychological conditions. Veteran Army Corporal John Wallace heads up this program to help the soldiers. He teamed up with the organization after they sent him “Tommy,” a dog who the soldiers cared for during the war in Afghanistan known as “Operation Enduring Freedom”. Together, they have helped transport 10 dogs from Afghanistan to the United States and have reunited them with the U.S. soldiers who cared for them during combat.

“Many times, soldiers rely on the dogs during war time and create special bonds with them,” explains John Wallace. “But when the troops finally leave, the animals are just left to fend for themselves, and often become targeted. Reuniting these soldiers with the dogs they had while deployed is therapeutic.”

The Soldier to Soldier program that the group is implementing helps those who must leave their pet behind. They find homes with other soldiers, so that one military member is helping another one out. All of the dogs rescued from the base will be placed in homes.

“We want to do all we can to help rescue these dogs, as well as help the veterans of this country,” added Misseri. “Our trek down to Fort Bragg will bring a lot of good to both sides, as we make good matches. Fort Bragg has been very supportive of our efforts and organization.”

“Working with Guardians of Rescue is a win-win-win for all parties, the service members suffering with PTSD, the animals we have rescued and our Animal Control and Adoption Center,” said Colonel Jeffrey M. Sanborn, the Fort Bragg garrison commander. ”This is a great example of how our Soldiers are being supported by communities nation-wide.”

Guardians of Rescue provides assistance to animals out on the streets, helping to rescue them, provide medical care, food and shelter, and find foster home placement. Many families are still struggling to recover from the storm, making it difficult to care for their pet, either financially or while living in temporary housing. To learn more, or to make a donation to support the Guardians of Rescue, log onto www.guardiansofrescue.org, Facebook page www.facebook.com/guardiansofrescueor the charity auction can be found here: http://givingworks.ebay.com/charity-auctions/charity/guardians-of-rescue/76791/.

About Guardians of Rescue

Based in New York, Guardians of Rescue is an organization whose mission is to protect the well being of all animals. They provide aid to animals in distress, including facilitating foster programs, rehabilitation, assisting other rescue groups, and providing support to families, both military and not, who need assistance due to economic factors. To learn more about Guardians of Rescue, visit the site at www.guardiansofrescue.org.

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