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The Linda Blair WorldHeart Foundation
November Update
Many of us are coming of a hard summer with fires and storms and now facing terrible, arctic early winter storms with dipping temperatures!
 
Please keep you and your family safe. If you know of or see an animals in trouble PLEASE DO SOMETHING! We are the only voice they have and many folks don't realize their pets, cant take these freezing temps and need to brought indoors. The pets will get sick or die in these freezing temperatures!
 
We are hard at work continue to rescue and make space in the shelters. We wanted to bring to you our newest video about just one rescue dog that is in our overcrowded shelters!
 
Check out Ruby's story below!
Be Prepared in Emergencies!
 
Make sure to update microchip information and have your veterinarian info on hand in case of emergencies. You never know when you may need the help!
 
Read our helpful tips below!
CANCER AND OBESITY IN AMERICA’S PETS
WHAT FOODS ARE SAFE?
 
Many of you are hearing the same scary information concerning your pets food, it IS SCARY and confusing everyone.
 
I shop in stores and see people with big POPULAR bags of dog food in their carts and I cringe. I know the food is making their dogs sick, obese and potentially life threatening through illnesses such as Cancer!
 
After feeding over 3,000 dogs over my rescue lifetime, I know exactly what has been fed and where obesity and Cancer come from.
 
I have learned that WHITE POTATO is an absolute; never feed, as it will most likely, cause the cancer cells in their bodies to feed and grow!  Sweet potato, on the other hand, is safe and fine to feed.
 
The questions about legumes, peas and lentils causing heart disease is a big topic of conversation, but in small doses, there is no proof that it leads to heart disease in dogs. The test studies have NOT BEEN DONE!
 
Simple rule of thumb: Dogs and cats, used to hunt for their food, which was a single protein. No additives. They ate grass for the enzymes to digest their dinner.
 
So keep it simple and basic!
 
Read your food bags and cans! The more ingredients listed usually indicates they are not actually putting in enough good meat in the product.
 
I believe in cost effective, quality food, with real meat, as America’s love for animals has grown,. More people rescue pets off the street or from shelters, but our difficult economy, does not afford high priced foods for our pets.
 
Here are a few brands I do feed to my 100 dogs in our rescue Wellness center:
Not found at the big box pet stores:
“Taste of the Wild”- PINE FOREST recipe.
PREY- Grain free  (only found at feed and some boutique stores)
GENTLE GIANTS- Salmon dry and canned. ( Must call around)
 
CHEWY- Currently if you are a new customer - they are having a sale
2 bags for the price of one on their American Journey Grain free!!
New customers use our sign up promo code www.chewy.co/RP/5385
 
American Journey, Grain free, Limited ingredient, Duck and sweet potato,        
American Journey, -Lamb and sweet potato, Limited Ingredient,                          
American Journey, Limited ingredient Turkey and Sweet potato                         
American Journey- grain free, Limited ingredient,  Salmon and sweet potato.
 
They also have the same matching cans and cookies.
 
With the holidays upon us, remember NO TABLE SCRAPS. Our human meals have many ingredients, dogs simply should not have.
 
Our dogs also are given and we recommend the following digestive enzymes - www.NZYMES.com
 
Call   877.816.6500 and ask for the Linda Blair Worldheart Foundation 10% trial discount special
 
 
YOUR DONATIONS SAVE LIVES!!! Please donate today to Linda Blair Worldheart!
 
Also, see our NEW LBWF autograph store to support the rescued animals of LBWF!
 

From the New York Times bestselling author of
Soldier Dogs, Top Dog, & Secret Service Dogs…
DOCTOR DOGS
How Our Best Friends Are Becoming Our Best Medicine

DOCTOR DOGS by Maria Goodavage; On-Sale: October 1, 2019
978-1524743048 | Dutton | $28.00 | hardcover | 368 pages
Praise for Doctor Dogs and Maria Goodavage
“This is a fascinating book about the amazing ways dogs can, and do, help people with physical and emotional problems.” —Dave Barry
“If you take an amazing subject and put it in the hands of a wonderful writer, you get…SPOILER ALERT…a truly fantastic book. Every single page of Maria Goodavage’s Doctor Dogs is made up of remarkable research and storytelling.”
—David Rosenfelt, bestselling author of Dogtripping
“Goodavage has done it again, with her fascinating investigation into the world of doctor dogs. A testament to the extraordinary connection between dogs and ourselves, and one more piece of evidence that their love for us truly knows no bounds.”
—Brian Hare, co-author of The Genius of Dogs
Three-time New York Times bestselling author Maria Goodavage is known for her powerful books about military and Secret Service dogs who keep everyone from troops to presidents out of harm’s way. In DOCTOR DOGS: How Our Best Friends Are Becoming Our Best Medicine (Dutton; publication date: October 1, 2019; hardcover, $28.00), the former USA Today journalist reveals the fascinating new ways dogs are saving lives every day in their emerging roles as “doctor dogs.”

DOCTOR DOGS by Maria Goodavage; On-Sale: October 1, 2019
978-1524743048 | Dutton | $28.00 | hardcover | 368 pages
This groundbreaking book is an in-depth and engaging investigation of the cutting-edge science behind how dogs are able to detect disease and aid people who suffer from a wide range of physical and mental health conditions, including cancer, Parkinson’s, diabetes, sleep disorders, autism, and schizophrenia. DOCTOR DOGS is Goodavage’s most personal book to date, as she has a difficult-to-diagnose cancer threat in her own family. Dogs have been shown to be able to detect this cancer in laboratory samples in its earliest stages.
The dogs’ primary tool for their medical feats? Their astonishingly sensitive noses, which can sniff in parts per trillion, as well as in 3-D.
Goodavage traveled around the world to see firsthand the advancing technologies involving dogs and their super noses. In Japan, where the world’s first scientific cancer screening by canines was taking place, she spent days with researchers in a remote region that has the highest mortality rate for stomach cancer in the country. She also witnessed the awesome power and sensitivity of the canine nose as dogs sniffed out cancer, malaria, and deadly bacteria at a research center in England, colorectal cancer in the Netherlands, ovarian cancer in Philadelphia, and the superbug C. difficile at a hospital in Vancouver. She interviewed a team that trains diabetic alert dogs in Rome and spent time with a Croatian family and their daughter’s autism assistance dog, Bob. During her extensive U.S. travels, she uncovered riveting stories of the lifesaving power of highly skilled doctor dogs—from canines who can sniff out seizures in advance to dogs who help their people cope with mental illness, including terrifying hallucinations.
The author balances a deep dive into science and medicine with warm storytelling about the people who have doctor dogs in their lives. Her meticulous first-hand research is made easy to understand by her highly readable style. One doesn’t have to be a dog lover to be engrossed in and inspired by the narrative, as well as be charmed by the humor inherent in some of the stories of the dogs, who are performing life-saving tasks for the simple rewards of a treat, a toy, or a pat on the head.

DOCTOR DOGS by Maria Goodavage; On-Sale: October 1, 2019
978-1524743048 | Dutton | $28.00 | hardcover | 368 pages

Crazy for kitties? Or do dogs make your tail wag? Are you ready for a best canine friend forever, or a meow-ing, purring friend? Thanks to veterinarian, Dr. Gary Weitzman, President and CEO of the San Diego Humane Society and National Geographic Kids books, there are (2) incredible guides; Cat Breed Guide and Dog Breed Guide to help you decide. Each book provides a complete reference to your purrrrrr-fect feline companion or canine fur-ever friend and are perfect for cat and dog-loving kids, as well as excellent resources for families who are bringing home their first four-legged family member.

Some questions to be asked to Dr. Gary Weitzman during interview on Talkin' Pets

Book #1:  National Geographic Kids: Dog Breed Guide: A Complete Reference to Your Best Friend Fur-Ever

* Did you know that the Great Dane can weigh up to 190 pounds? It's one of the biggest dogs in the world. What's one of the smallest? The Alaskan klee kai. Growing up to only nine pounds, this is one petite pint-size pooch! Big or small, active or couch potato, fluffy or wirehaired, a designer breed or mixed breed -- there is pooch to fit every lifestyle.

* From dachshunds to Dalmatians and poodles to pugs, this comprehensive guide gives an overview of more than 400 different dog breeds. 

* Which dogs make great family dogs, which are the most exotic and what breeds are the laziest?  Each profile includes the breed's "dog stats": country of origin, size, coat color and pattern, grooming difficulty, exercise needs, and "K-9 qualities." 

* From Wolf to Woof – how a breathtaking evolutionary leap resulted in the creation of the adorable, domesticated pups of today.

* Factors to consider to ensure sure you are choosing the right dog for your family

 * You’ve picked the pooch!  Now what? Tips for selecting a vet, puppy proofing and tips for the best gear to buy

 * How to speak dog –understanding behavior by looking at the eyes, ears, mouth, tail and overall body posture of your favorite pup

 * Plus - dogs in popular culture, dog ancestry, dogs with jobs, and so much more.

Book #2:  National Geographic Kids: Cat Breed GuideA Complete Reference to your Purr-Fect Best Friend 

Did you know that historians think American shorthairs are the descendants of cats that came to America on the Mayflower? Or that one of the newer cat breeds is called the toyger? It looks just like a toy-size--you guessed it--tiger!

* From Russian Blues and Munchkins to Maine Coons and Persians, this comprehensive guide gives an overview of 71 different cat breeds and Gary can talk about important "cat stats” like each breeds country of origin, size, coat color and pattern, grooming difficulty, and cat-titude. 

* Love heroic tales?  Not all cats wear capes fearless felines  abound – including the cat who blasted off into space in 1963, the seeing-eye kitty and Monty the alarm cat.

Preparing for a feline friend – breeder vs rescue, tips for making the first few days with your new friend a success, Including meeting the family, cat care and the low don on litter boxes and what should be on YOUR cat sitter’s checklist.

MORE ABOUT DR. GARY WEITZMAN:

Prior to joining San Diego Humane Society,  Dr. Weitzman served as Medical Director, and then President of the Washington Animal Rescue League. He led that urban shelter through a period of growth and established its national reputation as a resource for disaster and puppy mill rescues.

Dr. Weitzman served in the U.S. Air Force and owned an animal hospital in Burlingame, California. He earned a double BA in Biology and English from Colby College, a master’s degree in international Public Health from Boston University and his DVM from Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. He is a Certified Animal Welfare Administrator and is currently serving as Immediate Past Chair of the Board of the Society of Animal Welfare Administrators. He also serves on the board of Mama’s Kitchen, a San Diego nonprofit committed to providing food for people with chronic illnesses. For more information about Dr. Weitzman and San Diego Humane Society, please visit sdhumane.org.

Any dog owner can tell you that dogs are capable of that defining human emotion, love. Science, however, will disagree. Clive Wynne is a noted scientist who offers proof that dogs feel love, generate love, are love.
 
In DOG IS LOVE: Why and How Your Dog Loves You, pioneering canine behaviorist Clive Wynne reveals that dogs’ capacity for love, not their intelligence or submissiveness, lies at the heart of human-canine relationships.
 
Drawing on cutting-edge studies from labs around the world, Wynne shows that affection is the very essence of dogs, from the genes that code for loving behavior, through brain states that register and direct dogs’ affection for people, to the hormones that exactly match those in humans that show love.
 
Among the topics that DOG IS LOVE illuminates:
* How dogs are capable of building bridges of affection between species
* What conditions are needed in a dog’s early life to ensure that bonds of affection are forged
* How dogs developed the ability to love in a short - by evolutionary standards - period of time
* How we can use this knowledge to help dogs lead richer, more satisfying lives
 
Clive Wynne, Ph.D. is the founding director of the Canine Science Collaboratory at Arizona State University. He is widely published and has appeared on National Geographic Explorer, PBS, and the BBC. 
 

Talkin' Pets News

September 21, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jasmine Johnson - Jasmine the dog trainer

Producr - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guest - Jamie Gwen of Food & Wine with Chef Jamie Gwen will join Jon and Talkin' Pets at 630pm ET to discuss eating Carp for dinner

ABOUT THE BOOK
Communicating with and understanding dogs builds trusting relationships, relieves frustration, and improves lives at both ends of the leash. Apart from simply reading canine body language, this book explores the juncture between hearts and minds, where true understanding begins.
Taking a light-hearted yet earnest approach to exploring how to connect with dogs, each chapter features amusing, thought-provoking anecdotes and much useful information, showing us how, by connecting with our dogs, we learn how to connect with ourselves.
Finding the intersection between the academic and the spiritual for better communication with dogs leads to effective two-way conversation: how to talk with our dogs instead of talking at them.
The intuitive side of communicating with canines in conjunction with the intellectual side is also investigated: in this space, we build trust, respect, and better relationships, and human and canine lives are enriched.
Come walk with us on our journey ...
 
Letting in the dog by Patricia Blocker
 
ISBN: 9781787113053
UPC: 6-36847-01305-9
 
AVAILABLE NOW!
 
£10.99(UK), $13.99(US), 18.99(CAN)
 
 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Pat Blocker, CPDT-KA, owner of Peaceful Paws Dog Training is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer with over 20 years’ experience. Peaceful Paws specialises in resolving canine behaviour issues.
Pat’s passion is to help improve dogs’ lives by enhancing the human/canine relationship. She does so through education and force-free training, with emphasis on opening the lines of communication between humans and dogs.
Pat offers lectures and is a contributing feature writer for local dog magazines and community newsletters. She is the author of “Taking the Lead without Jerking the Leash, and The Art of Mindful Dog Training.”
 
SPECIFICATION
HH5305 • Paperback • 22.5x15.2cm • £10.99 • 96 pages • 15 pictures • ISBN: 978-1-787113-05-3 • UPC: 6-36847-01305-9
 
MORE INFORMATION
View sample pages and sample text on our website - https://www.veloce.co.uk or  01305 260068/e or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
 
RETAIL SALES
Veloce books are stocked by (or can be ordered from) bookshops by quoting the correct ISBN number. We also take orders direct: telephone 01305 260068 (+44 1305 260068 from outside UK), fax 01305 250479 (+44 1305 250479 from outside UK) or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Books can also be ordered on our website – https://www.veloce.co.uk
 
SOCIAL MEDIA
Twitter (Hubble & Hattie): https://twitter.com/HubbleandHattie
Facebook (Hubble & Hattie): https://www.facebook.com/hubbleandhattie
 

Cathy Symons wrote Blind Devotion: Enhancing the lives of Blind and Visually Impaired Dogs after her first dog, Booda, lost his sight at 7 years old. In it, Cathy uses her vast experience as a veterinary technician and canine rehabilitation practitioner to offer advice on caring for a blind dog. Cathy educates the reader on what it means to be blind, how to keep your pet safe, stimulating other senses, making life enjoyable for your pet and developing new commands. She also discusses difficult topics such as quality of life, commitment, anxiety, enucleation, and addressing owner emotions.

Several years later, Cathy adopted another blind pug named Digger and wrote a children’s book Watching Out for Digger, which she uses as a teaching tool for young children to learn about living with a disabled dog.

After fifteen years of practice as a vet tech, Cathy went on to study canine rehabilitation at the University of Tennessee. In 2003 Cathy was one of the first of thirty-six people in the country to become a certified canine rehabilitation practitioner.

Shortly after obtaining her CCRP Cathy was instrumental in establishing the first veterinary rehabilitation center in Massachusetts and continues to follow the latest options in rehabilitation including Digital Thermal Imaging and Laser Therapy.

Cathy has devoted her life to being an advocate for physically and sensory impaired dogs.

DOG WRITERS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

DWAA Writing Competition Is Open!

It's the most wonderful time of the dog writing year! The DWAA official writing competition is now accepting entries.

This year, we have a brand new website and a streamlined process. In the Special Awards categories, so far we have 22 special categories totaling almost $14,000 thanks to our amazing sponsors, which you can view below. Good luck! Heads up: Annual event and awards tickets go on sale on 08/01/19. 

 
Enter Now
 

AKC Club Publication Excellence Award
Sponsored by the American Kennel Club, this award is for the best article in a national, regional or local AKC club publication in magazine or newsletter format. The award consists of a plaque and a $500 cash grant.

 

AKC Reunite Microchip Awareness Award
Sponsored by AKC Reunite for the best article on how microchips can be used in pet recovery. Articles can include recovery stories of how dogs were identified or returned to owners, permanent identification in cases of theft, uses of microchips to confirm identity of dogs in competition, etc. The award is a $1,000 cash grant. For information about actual recovery stories, writers can contact AKC Reunite at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Public Service Award
Sponsored by the American Kennel Club, this award goes to the writer of a print or online feature article that best educates pet owners about responsible dog ownership. The award consists of a plaque and a $500 cash grant. To enter, submit one article, which must also be entered in this year’s contest in one of the regular categories.

 

The AKC Family Dog Award
Sponsored by the American Kennel Club, this award is for the best writing (including books, articles and blog posts) about any or all of the good manners programs under the AKC Family Dog umbrella, including AKC Therapy Dog, AKC Trick Dog, AKC Canine Good Citizen, AKC Community Canine, Urban CGC and AKC S.T.A.R. Puppy. While participating in these activities that are fun for both dogs and people, dogs become well-socialized and develop a lifelong bond with their owners. This award consists of a $500 cash grant.

 

The Canine Scribbles Award
Sponsored by Canine Scribbles, LLC, this is awarded for the best article that promotes the reasons to own a purebred canine. The fiction or nonfiction article of 1000 to 1500 words must be published in a print or online publication. The focus of the article should exemplify the virtues of owning a specific purebred dog. A high-resolution .jpeg (at least 300 dpi) should accompany the article that depicts the canine about which the article is written. The article should be clearly and succinctly written, and should outline the advantages of purebred dog ownership, with a unique journalistic voice. $350 cash grant.

 

The Captain William Lewis Judy Award
Sponsored by American Legion Post #348, Brick Township, N.J. and Lisa Begin-Kruysman. For a submission in any form of media that educates the public about the important role our military dogs play in our Armed Forces, including issues affecting their emotional and physical care during their training, active service and retirement. The award consists of a $350 cash grant.

 

Dr. Harvey’s Canine Health Award
Sponsored by Dr. Harvey’s Fine Health Foods for Companion Animals, this award is for the best online blog post written by a dog blogger that exemplifies good health and wellness for dogs. The award consists of a $500 cash grant.

 

The Dogster Health & Wellness Award
This award recognizes the article/column that did the best to promote home-care health awareness — identifying health and wellness best practices that dog owners can carry out at home for the dogs they love. Dogster helps dogs by helping dog owners and wants to recognize an outstanding written piece that does the same. $500 cash grant.

 

The Fidose of Reality Dog Blogger Award
Sponsored by Darlene and Carol Bryant on behalf of FidoseofReality.com, this award is given to a non-corporate dog blogger. Composing a quality dog product or service review is an art. The winning dog blog post exemplifies the elements of a solid dog product or service review that go above and beyond the basics. Entries will be judged on writing style, grammar, punctuation, imagery/video, and the overall way the review is presented. The award consists of a $300 cash prize and a trophy.

 

DWAA Junior Writer Award
Sponsored by Karen Petit, an author of children’s books, for writers under 18 years of age. This award is to recognize and encourage young writers who exhibit talent, resourcefulness, dedication and integrity in their writing about dogs and dog-related topics. Award: $400 cash grant, DWAA Maxwell Medallion and lapel pin.

 

DWAA Robert H. McKowen Memorial Friends of Rescue Award
Sponsored by his family and friends. For the best article describing the rescue process: adoption, fostering, transporting, home visits or other aspects of rescue. $300 cash grant.

 

The Fear Free Pets Award
Sponsored by Fear Free, LLC, this is awarded for the article, book, blog, TV segment, radio spot, video, column or other creative media format that best educates, promotes, or demonstrates the importance and benefits of taking a dog to a Fear Free certified veterinary professional. This may also include how a dog’s emotional well-being can play a role in all aspects of its life and health, including veterinary care, how decreasing fear, anxiety, and stress is beneficial to the patient and owner both during the veterinary visit and at home, a focus on Fear Free applications pre- and post-veterinary visit, successful case studies/stories of how a dog went from fearful to Fear Free during or throughout the course of a single or series of veterinary visits, positive experiences working with a Fear Free certified veterinary professional or anything that highlights how Fear Free and what it stands for is all around better for staff, patients, and clients. This award consists of a $2,000 cash grant and a one-of-a-kind commemorative award.

 

Fear Free Dog Enrichment Award
Sponsored by Fear Free, LLC, this is awarded for the article, book, blog, TV segment, radio spot, video, column or other creative media formats that best educates, promotes, or demonstrates how enrichment activities (exercise, food puzzles, scent training, etc.) can benefit a dog’s emotional—not just physical—well-being and the role that has in their overall health. This may also include topics relating to how the resulting benefits of such enrichment to the dog’s emotional well-being can help set them up for more successful veterinary visits in the future, thus living a happier, healthier life. This award consists of a $2,000 cash grant and a one-of-a-kind commemorative award.

 

The Good News For Pets Award
Sponsored by GoodNewsForPets.com in celebration of the digital platform’s 20th anniversary, this award is for the best digital story – online video, blog post or online article with photography that best demonstrates the bond between people and their canine companions. The content must be demonstrated as having been shared through digital media. The winner will receive a $500 grant.

 

The Harrison Stephens Inspirational Feature Award
Named in honor of Harrison Stephens, a newspaper editor who wrote thought-provoking features marked by journalistic integrity and humor until his death just before his 100th birthday. This award is for a feature article that highlights the human-canine bond and leaves the reader with a smile. Potential topics include working dogs (or a lazy dog with a winning personality), or dog-centric nonprofits that promote positive outcomes for pets and people. The award is sponsored by Sally and Tom Reeder and consists of a $300 grant.

 

The Heroes for Healthy Pets Award
Sponsored by Merck Animal Health, this award is open to all forms of media that cover topics on infectious diseases that affect dogs. The winner will receive a plaque and a $1,500 cash grant.

 

James Colasanti, Jr. Poetry Award  
For the poem/poetry which best exemplifies the unconditional love of a dog. Sponsored by James Colasanti Jr. The award is a $200 cash grant.

 

The PSI Professional Pet Care Award
Sponsored by Pet Sitters International (PSI), this award is presented to the entry that best educates pet owners about the benefits of using professional pet sitters. Qualifying online or print entries include newspaper or magazine articles and blog posts. This award consists of a $300 cash prize.

 

The Rio Award
Sponsored by Jen Reeder and Bryan Fryklund in honor of their beloved Labrador retriever mix, Rio, this award is for an article, book or essay that profiles a dog who changed someone’s life in a profoundly positive way. The award consists of a $300 cash prize.

 

The Sleepypod Pet Safety Award
Sponsored by Sleepypod, this award is for the best article or book that shares tips for pet safety during travel and/or anecdotes of dogs helped by owners who take safety precautions. The award consists of a $500 cash grant.

 

The Vet Candy Award
The Vet Candy Award will be presented to the writer with the most inspiring story about a veterinarian or veterinary professional in a newsletter, magazine, or blog post format. The award consists of $300 and a plaque.

 

The Walter R. Fletcher Memorial Award
Sponsored by The Westminster Kennel Club in memory of legendary dog show reporter Walter Fletcher, this annual award goes to the reporter who best exemplifies continued press coverage of dog shows in America. The writer must have written a bylined article in a print or online general interest publication about a dog show (or shows). The winner will be honored with a reserved seat in the Walter Fletcher Memorial Chair for both nights of the 2018 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. The chair is located at the end of the front row, in the working press section, on the arena floor of Madison Square Garden. The winner will also receive $300.

 

Dogwise Best Book Award
Sponsored by Dogwise Publishing. $500 to the author of the best book. The winner will be chosen by the president of DWAA from the winners of all the book categories. The award is a $500 cash grant. Do not apply for this award.

 

DWAA Distinguished Service Award
Sponsored by the American Kennel Club, this award honors extraordinary achievement and communications excellence. It recognizes the person who, by word, deed, exemplary conduct, public communication and professional excellence, best promotes the interest of the sport of dogs. The award consists of a plaque and a $1,000 cash grant. Do not apply for this award.

 
Click here for more information or to enter:
Enter Now

As always, we depend on our professional members to volunteer as judges! If you can spare a few hours in late September/early October, please email Contest Chair Darlene Bryant:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

Thank you and good luck!

 
Stay Safe & Support Rescue Pets this 4th of July!
I am thinking of you, your family and your pets during this Fourth of July holiday! 
Since the world is a bit crazier than years past, I just want to give a brief reminder to keep your eyes open, stay safe, and never put you, your family or your pets in compromising situations during this holiday season.. 
In California and many places around the country, there is an enormous amount of illegal fireworks being set of, as you already know. Your pets’ simply cannot stand this horrible time and they become stressed to the point they can break out of anywhere!
There are many herbal remedies available for animals in many pet stores, which we highly recommend! From now through the Fourth of July, at any time, day or night, reckless people will be shooting off fireworks and trying to scare and hurt animals.
Keep your pets inside and monitor them when they are outside! Please, keep your cat safe as well! I don’t want to go into details about bad teenagers and people that can hurt your pets! If you see an animal being hurt, please call 911!
 I realize people want to go to parties and have fun but your pets have to be number one! Play gentle music loud enough to drown out as many noises as possible. TV programming that won’t upset your pets like a good movie or old-fashioned television shows that air constantly on different channels will also work to drown out the noise of fire crackers and M80s that unruly neighbors might be shooting off. Animals are able to hear the vibration way before you can! Put them away in a room… Just keep them safe! Don’t leave them in hot cars! 
We have been saving people’s pets that have been abandoned at shelters for the last three weeks, and now we are down to the wire as the holiday approaches! The shelters are clearing out as many abandoned pets, as they can to make room for people’s pets that run away from the fireworks!
 They are literally euthanizing really nice dogs and cats that just don’t deserve to be born to die because it’s the Fourth of July week! 
 Make sure your pets’ microchips are up-to-date! If you don’t have your dog or cat microchipped, maybe it is the time to make a veterinarian appointment and get one done! It’s a matter of finding your pet if they run away! Otherwise you’ll never see them again, that’s just the truth nowadays… I don’t want that for you. Below you will see some pictures of a few of the many dogs both small and large that we’ve been rescuing over the last few weeks. We still have many more coming in from a variety of shelters as we are trying to help out as much as we can all over Southern California. 
 Please donate! All donations will help save lives! It is an emergency fund raiser to help as many as we can. We still need food to feed them, portable water that has to be trucked in since we are in the high desert, baby pools for them to cool off in, in the high heat and we keep our window unit air conditioners working to cool down from the high heat so our electrical bills are pretty high!
No donation is too small or large! Right now the shelters are just begging for us to get the pets out to make room! We service our community. I volunteer all of my time in hours, crisscrossing the country, trying to educate on animal welfare, spay and neuter and stamp out animal abuse!
I am forever grateful for your love and support, and as usual we need it now more than ever during the summer! I’m counting on you.
 From the bottom my heart,
 Thank You & Stay Safe,
Linda Blair
 
Meet Our Newest Rescues!
Happy Tails!
Congratulations to Rory, Zora, Lydia, Missy & Golden Boy on finding your
Forever Loving Homes!
Amazon Smile Donates To LBWF
When shopping on Amazon, please remember to use Amazon Smile and choose Linda Blair Worldheart Foundation as your charity of choice and Amazon will donate 0.5% of your eligible Amazon Smile purchases to LBWF! Click the picture to sign up!
Happy Tails!
Linda Blair Worldheart Foundation

 

Brachycephalic breeds are getting more and more popularity these days and you probably think they are cute too. These breeds include the Pekinese, Pug, French Bulldog, Shih Tzu, Boston Terrier and more. It is important for people and future owners to know that behind that cute and irresistible look, these dogs have quite few health problems.


The reason for the health problems

If you look closely at the anatomy of their head, you will notice they have flat face and their skull is wide. This seems like their skull has been compressed and even in some dogs the nose can be unapparent.

This confrontation can cause problems in three main systems: the respiratory system, the skin and the eyes.

The most noticeable problem for these dogs is the breathing. Have you ever noticed how a pug breathes? Or more accurate, how they fight for a breath sometimes? Have you ever heard them snoring and thought it was so adorable? Well, for them personally it isn’t. It is like you having stuck nose and having difficult time breathing.

BUAOS - Brachycephalic Upper Airway Obstructive Syndrome

The name of the respiratory disorders in brachycephalic dogs is Brachycephalic Upper Airway Obstructive Syndrome. What actually happened is that the skull and the space inside the skull got smaller, however the soft tissues, most importantly the soft palate, the tongue remained the same size. This is what causes the breathing problems in brachycephalic breeds.

Problems of the skin

You have probably noticed by now that these breeds have folded skin on their faces. These folds are the best place for yeasts and bacteria to grow and you guessed it- they cause infections and skin inflammations. The folds are formed because of the excessive skin covering the face.

Problems of the eyes

It is well known that brachycephalic breeds are more prone to eye problems than other dogs, just because of their skull anatomy. Their eyeballs protrude significantly, compared to other breeds, and this is because their eye sockets are too shallow. This results in more frequent eye traumas, dry eyes, ulcers.

Brachycephalic dogs have a very nice character and they are amazing pets; however, we can’t disregard their health and what is best for their well-being. If you are planning to become a pet owner of any of these breeds it is very important to know about their health and what owning a brachycephalic dog means. If you would like to learn more about these dogs, you can continue reading about “Problems associated with Brachycephalic Dogs”.

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