marine
Displaying items by tag: Nepal

Review written by Jon Patch with 3.5 paws out of 4

Doctor Strange

Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures and Marvel Studios present a PG-13, 115 minute, 3d, Action, Adventure, Fantasy film directed by Scott Derrickson and written by Derrickson and Jon Spaihts with a theater release date of November 4, 2016.

     
 

 
 

Tiger Population Rebounds in Parsa, Nepal,
Instilling Hope for the Species

Remarkable Recovery Shows Rigorous Anti-Poaching Efforts & Monitoring Key to Tigers’ Resurgence

 
July 29, 2016
 

In a rare victory for a species on the brink of extinction throughout much of its range, a scientific camera trap survey has revealed a marked increase in the tiger population of Nepal’s Parsa Wildlife Reserve. This news comes on International Tiger Day, a day dedicated to recognizing the plight of tigers around the world.

The Government of Nepal’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation (DNPWC), National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC), Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization, and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) collaborated to carry out the 2016 population survey in Parsa as part of their ongoing partnership to protect and monitor tigers throughout the lowlands of Nepal.

Nepal’s Director General of the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Krishna Acharya said, “The tiger population in Parsa Wildlife Reserve has significantly increased since the last census. This is fantastic news for tigers and it demonstrates that Nepal’s dedicated conservation efforts are delivering clear results. Nepal has committed to doubling its tiger population by 2022 and encouraging results like these show that we are on track to achieve that.”

Panthera Senior Tiger Program Director, Dr. John Goodrich, stated, “The impressive rise in Parsa’s tiger numbers has been fuelled by the natural movement of animals from neighboring Chitwan as conditions in Parsa have improved over the past three years. This is a testament to how law enforcement and strong government leadership can change the game for tigers. At a time when poachers are waging an all-out war against wildlife, Nepal serves as a beacon of hope for the tiger.”

ZSL’s Conservation Programmes Director, Prof. Jonathan Baillie said “Success for tiger conservation requires viable habitats, stringent protection, effective monitoring and community engagement and when those conditions are in place, tiger numbers will flourish as Parsa has demonstrated very clearly. Nepal’s exemplary track record in conserving its iconic wildlife makes it a conservation leader in the South Asian region.”

Today, just 3,900 wild tigers remain in all of Asia, largely due to poaching for the illegal wildlife trade. Nepal is estimated to support 163-235 tigers, according to a 2013 population survey. The 2016 survey confirms that Parsa specifically has seen around a 45% annual increase in its tiger population.

Nepal’s tremendous commitment to increasing coordinated law enforcement activities, harsh prosecution for poachers, and wildlife monitoring sets the nation apart from many other tiger range states. Hundreds of dedicated personnel from the Nepal Army and DNPWC jointly patrol Parsa Wildlife Reserve and other protected areas, preventing poaching of Nepal’s iconic wildlife, from the tiger to the greater one-horned rhinoceros. Yet there is still much work to be done.

Parsa’s tiger rebound can also be attributed to the empowerment of the country’s National Park and Wildlife Reserve Wardens, who maintain the authority to arrest, convict and sentence poachers. This model is in stark contrast to many tiger range states where poachers often escape with little to no jail time or fines, even after sentencing.

The success of these stringent anti-poaching efforts is especially evident in neighboring Chitwan National Park. Acting as a source population for Parsa, tigers from Chitwan have moved into the adjoining landscape, accelerating population recovery, and ultimately creating a larger more viable population that extends across both protected areas.

Since 2014, Panthera and ZSL have collaborated in Parsa Wildlife Reserve to monitor tigers and their prey using camera traps, and provide training for effective law enforcement and use of SMART, a computer-based platform that improves the effectiveness of wildlife patrols.

Parsa is also a trial site for innovative conservation technologies, which have been effectively deployed to provide valuable information to park managers. This includes ZSL’s seismic and magnetic sensors and Panthera’s PoacherCam – a remote camera that distinguishes people from wildlife and can transmit images to law enforcement, to stop poaching before it happens.

ZSL in partnership with DNPWC has also recently equipped and supported the deployment of a state of the art Rapid Response Patrol team in Parsa, which further strengthens the capacity of the park management to prevent tiger poaching before it takes place.

Over the next few years Panthera and ZSL plan to expand their efforts to support the Government of Nepal in its tiger conservation initiatives across three other protected areas that are home to tigers in the lowlands of Nepal.

Learn more about Panthera’s Tigers Forever Program.

Learn more about ZSL’s conservation efforts in Asia

About ZSL
Founded in 1826, the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) is an international scientific, conservation and educational charity whose mission is to promote and achieve the worldwide conservation of animals and their habitats. Our mission is realised through our ground-breaking science, our active conservation projects in more than 50 countries and our two Zoos, ZSL London Zoo and ZSL Whipsnade Zoo. For more information visit www.zsl.org

 
 
 

 
 
  About
Panthera
Panthera, founded in 2006, is devoted exclusively to preserving wild cats and their critical role in the world’s ecosystems. Panthera’s team of leading biologists, law enforcement experts and wild cat advocates develop innovative strategies based on the best available science to protect cheetahs, jaguars, leopards, lions, pumas, snow leopards and tigers and their vast landscapes. In 50 countries around the world, Panthera works with a wide variety of stakeholders to reduce or eliminate the most pressing threats to wild cats—securing their future, and ours.  
     
    Visit panthera.org  
     
 
     

Panthera Head Office
8 West 40th Street, 18th Floor
New York, NY 10018

 
 
 
If you would rather not receive future communications from Panthera, let us know by clicking here.
Panthera, 8 West 40th Street 18th Floor, New York, NY 10018 United States

Up to nine million animals were affected by earthquake and aftershocks, HSI estimates

KATHMANDU (15 May 2015)—Following Tuesday’s destructive aftershock in Nepal, Humane Society International will send livestock veterinarians to care for animals in heavily affected rural areas. HSI continues to conduct an assessment of the needs of local animal welfare organizations for expansion of their facilities and will meet these needs on a case-by-case basis. HSI estimates that as many as 6 million to 9 million cows, goats and other livestock were injured or killed following the April 25 earthquake. Thousands of street dogs and cats also are in need of care.

Humane Society International’s Sarah Vallentine, who lives in Kathmandu, said: “Tuesday’s strong aftershock caused further destruction and has worsened the conditions of many people and animals already traumatized by the devastating April 25 earthquake. The initial earthquake caused animals to suffer a range of conditions from broken and crushed bones and lacerations and respiratory disease like pneumonia from days and nights exposed to the elements without shelter. We’ll continue to assist with vital supplies – humanitarian and veterinary - to provide a lifeline to both animals and people struggling to cope here in Nepal.”  

Humane Society International will continue to help animals, large and small, affected by Nepal’s earthquake and strong aftershocks:

  • HSI is working with its affiliates, the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association and Humane Society International/Australia, to deploy three veterinarians with livestock expertise to Nepal in the coming days. 
  • This week, our vets travelled to Sindhupalchok to carry out crucial vaccinations and veterinary treatments, in partnership with World Vets, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, Animal Nepal, SPCA Nepal, Himalayan Animal Rescue Team and Nepal’s Department of Livestock Services.
  • HSI is providing tarpaulins to shelter goats, cows, poultry and other animals from the harsh sun and driving monsoon rain. Many of these animals have been exposed to the elements since the earthquakes destroyed their permanent shelters, and as a result they are suffering from respiratory illnesses. Animal Welfare Network of Nepal (AWNN) will coordinate the supply of these tarps and will also assist in setting them up with the villagers in remote locations.

HSI will work  with animal groups in Nepal, including: AWNN, Society for Animal Welfare and Management, the Kathmandu Animal Treatment Center, Animal Nepal, Nepal SPCA, Himalayan Animal Rescue Team and others.

Donations are urgently needed to support our lifesaving efforts in Nepal and wherever animals and people are affected by disasters.

Animal Victims of Nepal’s Earthquake Receive Emergency Aid from Humane Society International’s Veterinary Medical Team

HSI helps dogs, cows, goats, chickens and people alike in strike zone;

(1 May 2015) – Animals injured or abandoned as a result of Nepal’s devastating earthquake are receiving emergency veterinary aid and care from Humane Society International’s Animal Rescue Team. HSI is working with our partner organisations such as Animal Welfare Network of Nepal in Kathmandu to provide life-saving veterinary medicines, vaccinations, surgical equipment and other supplies, as well as looking into providing shelter and food for sick, injured, lost and abandoned animals.

Alongside the thousands of people killed or displaced after the earthquake, thousands of animals are also struggling to cope with the aftermath. Many have sustained injuries from being trapped in collapsed buildings or hit by falling debris; thousands of animals have been crushed to death or buried alive in the disaster.

Rahul Sehgal, director of HSI Asia, said: “There is complete devastation in many areas for people and animals alike, and we’re helping both. For many people, their animals are all they have left, so HSI’s animal aid is a vital lifeline. Today the team has visited several affected areas where the surviving animals are living in stressful conditions, often exposed to the elements and in need of basic veterinary care and medicines. We are attempting to locate a facility to serve as a temporary shelter for animals who have been left behind as well as for animals in critical need as assessed by the team. We also helped a man who was singlehandedly trying to clear out the rubble of his home so that he could retrieve whatever worldly possessions he had left. Compassion doesn’t care if you have two legs or four.”

In Sengden Village a remote village outside Kathmandu where 85 per cent of the houses were levelled, people and animals are living in makeshift tents. One woman encountered by our team, Mrs Purnima Tamang, is all alone without family except for her flock of eight goats that she refuses to leave as they all shelter together in what remains of her home. “Call them what you want – my property, my family, my friends, they are all I have left,” she told HSI’s rescue team.

Her goats are suffering from exposure, having been soaked by rain for five days, and so HSI veterinarians are treating their respiratory problems and will return to help Mrs Tamang with medicine and food.

In every village HSI has visited so far, animals are getting sick from exposure in the heavy rain; many are too sick to eat, and most of the animal feed is buried in the rubble anyway. Complicating matters is that many of these villages are not easily reached as they are remote and reached only by mountainous dirt roads. It is a desperate situation, and HSI veterinarians have been the first responders on the ground to provide aid in many of these villages.

Seghal, said: “We are seeing a wide variety of animal issues here such as animals lacking shelter, food and medicines. We were able to provide treatment for some physical injuries such as cuts and lacerations, but we realize that the disaster for the surviving animals has just begun. In the absence of basic needs most of the goats are already showing signs of respiratory stress and almost all animals have diarrhoea. These signs indicate the urgent need to provide veterinary care to prevent onset of life threatening diseases. These animals have already survived a large scale disaster and it would be heart-breaking to see them succumb to something as easily preventable as respiratory diseases.. The humanitarian teams are vaccinating people and we’re working alongside them vaccinating animals. Everyone needs help here.”

We will continue to provide updates as well as photos from our animal rescue efforts in Nepal. Email the HSI media contacts to be kept informed of developments. Donations are urgently needed to support our lifesaving efforts in Nepal and wherever animals and humans are affected by disaster.