Displaying items by tag: tiger

Talkin' Pets News

May 18, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Jarrod Lazarus - Humane Society Tampa Bay

Producer - Daisey Charlotte

Reporter - Georgia Malpartida

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guest - Disabled War Veteran James Hayes will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 5/18/19 at 630pm ET to discuss Ethical Products and Dogs4Warriors and will give away pet Barrett Balls as well

Talkin' Pets News

February 16, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Andrew Moerschel

Social Media / Production - Bob Page

Special Guest - Jerry Grymek - Doggie Concierge Hotel Penn hour 1

 

 

Animal Defenders International (ADI) has renewed its call for Congress to support the Traveling Exotic Animal and Public Safety Protection Act (HR1759) after a tiger owned by former Ringling Bros big cat trainer, Alexander Lacey, was shot dead by police in Georgia yesterday.

Tim Phillips, President of Animal Defenders International, said:When things go wrong in wild animal circuses they go seriously wrong. Aside from the public danger, this tiger has paid with her life for a human error, all in the name of frivolous entertainment. This tragic incident adds to the already overwhelming evidence showing traveling wild animal acts are not safe for animals or people and we urge Congress to act.”

HR 1759 was introduced March 28 by Representatives Ryan Costello (R-PA) and Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ), and aims to amend the Animal Welfare Act to restrict the use of exotic and wild animals in traveling circuses and traveling performances. The bill has 32 co-sponsors.

The tiger, called Suzy, escaped while being transported from Florida to Tennessee, during a stop in Georgia. Spotted on the interstate, the tiger entered a residential area and, as stated by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, after she “became aggressive toward pets in the area, it was deemed necessary for public safety to put it down”. Transporter Feld Entertainment, the parent company of Ringling Bros Circus, has stated they didn’t know Suzy was missing until they had reached their destination, raising concerns as to whether the big cats were properly checked.

Alexander Lacey plans to take his tigers, lions and a leopard to a German circus, following the closure of Ringling Bros earlier this year. An application to export the big cats from the US was opposed by ADI and other animal groups, as well as members of the public. The permit was approved August 14 by the US Fish and Wildlife Service but according to staff, still needs to be signed off after a correction is made.

Over the years, ADI has caught on film a catalogue of abuse at circuses owned by the big cat trainer’s father Martin Lacey Snr:

  • Tigers hit with whips and sticks by Martin Lacey Sr and his daughter Natasha Lacey.
  • Elephants abused, punched, and hit with brooms and sticks by their presenter and groom. Martin Lacey Sr told Members of the British Parliament that the elephants were not chained, yet ADI video evidence showed that they were chained every day, for up to 11 hours.
  • Lions and tigers confined in transporters 27 hours for a journey time of 3 hours 25 minutes.
  • Government circus inspection reports revealed big cats lived the whole year in cages on the back of transporters; tigers gave birth while on tour; and an elephant that was “chronically and obviously lame,” with a chronic abscess that “should be seen by a veterinary surgeon … as soon as possible.”
  • Alexander Lacey’sbeastman” lost his temper and lashed out at and hit tigers in a beast wagon; he also hit a lioness in the mouth with a metal bar.
  • Alexander Lacey jabbed a big cat hard with a stick, and concealed a seriously injured lioness from inspectors.

Given the constant travel and their temporary nature, circuses cannot provide animals with adequate facilities to keep them physically or psychologically healthy. Welfare is always compromised.

Expert analysis of scientific evidence commissioned by the Welsh Government and undertaken by Professor Steven Harris at Bristol University last year concluded, “The available scientific evidence indicates that captive wild animals in circuses and other travelling animal shows do not achieve their optimal welfare requirements.” The report stated that “Life for wild animals in travelling circuses…does not appear to constitute either a ‘good life’ or a ‘life worth living’”.

The Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE) has concluded “there is by no means the possibility that their [wild mammals in travelling circuses’] physiological, mental and social requirements can adequately be met.”

The British Veterinary Association concludes that “The welfare needs of non-domesticated, wild animals cannot be met within a travelling circus - in terms of housing or being able to express normal behaviour.”

Nearly 40 countries around the world and more than 70 local US jurisdictions have introduced prohibitions on animals in circuses to date. Several states including New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania have introduced and are considering similar legislation. Illinois recently passed a ban on elephant performances and the New York Governor has a similar bill on his desk awaiting signature.

Please visitwww.ad-international.org for more information.

 

AUSTIN, Texas (April 27, 2016) — A state administrative court has concluded a two-day hearing on whether Kristin Lindsey will lose her Texas veterinary license after shooting an arrow through a cat’s head, posting a picture of it on Facebook and bragging about the killing. A ruling is expected later this year.

Misty Christo, an attorney with Alley Cat Allies, was in the hearing room in Austin for both days of testimony about Tiger, the cat that Lindsey killed. The Texas Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners argued that the cat who was killed was in fact Tiger, was owned, and was killed without his owners’ consent.

“It was shocking to hear testimony confirming that Tiger was still alive in the picture that Kristen Lindsey posted on Facebook,” Christo said. “The testimony demonstrated in terrible detail how much Tiger suffered from her cruelty.”

“And regardless of any questions about whether this cat was Tiger, it was completely unacceptable for a veterinarian to kill him this way. Kristen Lindsey betrayed the trust that we place in veterinarians to care for animals. The information from this hearing emphatically reaffirmed that her veterinary license should be revoked forever. She should never care for an animal again.”

Alley Cat Allies has posted more details about the testimony and pictures from the hearing here: https://www.alleycat.org/news-april2016-kristen-lindsey-hearing.

As the nation’s only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats, Alley Cat Allies has followed the case from the beginning, called for action against Lindsey and offered testimony in preliminary hearings.

Attorneys in the case have until June 10 to file closing briefs to the court. Reply briefs will then be due by July 1. Alley Cat Allies will continue to follow the case and share new developments and the ruling as they occur.

 

About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 600,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens nationwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

Review written by Jon Patch with 3.5 out of 4 paws

The Jungle Book

Walt Disney Pictures, Moving Picture Company and Fairview Entertainment present a PG, 105 minute, 3D, Action, Adventure, Drama, Family film, directed by Jon Favreau, screenplay by Justin Marks and book by Rudyard Kipling with a theater release date of April 15, 2016.


 
April 18, 2015, Lima, Peru: Hoover the tiger, Mustafa the mountain lion and Condorito the condor have been removed from two circuses in northern Peru during raids as part of Animal Defenders International’s (ADI) mission to enforce Peru’s ban on the use of wild animals in circuses, Operation Spirit of Freedom.
 
ADI, Peruvian authorities ATFFS Piura, and the police moved in after ADI received tip-offs that two circuses were illegally operating with wild animals in the area. Both circuses heavily resisted the legal action, with riot police and the Public Prosecutor called in to secure the condor and mountain lion during a long and hostile stand-off.
 
Almost 80 animals have been rescued from circuses and the illegal wildlife trade during ADI’s Operation Spirit of Freedom so far.  The rescue mission will culminate in June with a huge airlift to Denver, Colorado of 33 lions, a bear and now Hoover the tiger. The animals are destined for The Wild Animal Sanctuary in Colorado where large acreage habitats are being prepared for them. ADI is also relocating nearly 50 native wild animals to a specially built facility at Pilpintuwasi near Iquitos in the Amazon with the Peruvian Air Force providing an aircraft for the animals and the Navy providing river transport.
 
Hoover the tiger was removed from Circo Africano, the same circus that Cholita, an endangered Andean spectacled bear who has won the public’s hearts, was removed from several years ago. Cholita, dubbed the “real life Paddington bear”, had her paws mutilated to remove her claws and has lost most of her fur.
 
Eight months ago, ADI was poised to remove two tigers from the same circus but it slipped through the net and eluded authorities until now – the other tiger died during that time. Hoover is the sole survivor of up to six tigers with the circus.  He is thin and will be monitored closely by the ADI veterinary team.
 
ADI was tipped off about the location of the circus via social media and began discussions with ATFFS Piura about the seizure operation whilst continuing to trail the circus.  The organisations were then tipped off about another circus in the area.
 
The second raid took place on Circo Koreander less than 24 hours after the first, in an isolated village in the same area of northern Peru.  A mountain lion called Mustafa who was kept chained in the back of a pick-up truck was removed by ADI along with Condorito the condor, named after a Chilean comic book character. The heated seizure saw police reinforcements and the Public Prosecutor called in. Legal proceedings are now underway concerning the circus’ obstruction of the seizure and to try and secure a monkey still with the circus.
 
The seizure operation began on Sunday with ADI trucks carrying cages heading to the circus locations, and ended on Friday morning with the animals arriving safely at ADI’s Spirit of Freedom Rescue Center near Lima.
 
Animal Defenders International President Jan Creamer, who oversaw the difficult seizures in Peru this week said, “Before we began seizure operations with the Peruvian authorities last year, ADI conducted a census of all animal circuses in Peru.  Some disappeared as soon as the first seizures took place, but we have steadily tracked down every circus that was on that list and removed their wild animals. It has been public tip-offs to ADI that have led to the seizures on the last three circuses so we urge people to remain vigilant and report any sightings of wild animals in circuses.”
 
Jan Creamer:  “A huge thank you to the Piura ATFFS, police and Public Prosecutor who stood up for these animals in very difficult circumstances and ensured the animals were safely removed by ADI.”
 
ADI’s Spirit of Freedom flight to take the 33 lions and Cholita the bear to the USA had originally been planned for April. However, ADI, Peruvian authorities SERFOR and ATFFS, The Wild Animal Sanctuary and Denver International Airport all agreed the priority had to be saving the animals, and so the airlift has been postponed until June and will now take Hoover the tiger to a new life in the US.
 
Jan Creamer: “We never gave up hope that we would find the illegal circuses and give each and every animal the chance of a better life, free from their circus cages and chains.  Locating and raiding circuses all over Peru and looking after this number of different animals has been a huge challenge. Now we are looking forward to the next stage: getting all of the animals ADI has rescued to their new homes.”
 

Operation Spirit of Freedom rescue mission is expected to cost ADI over $1.2 million, with the biggest single cost being the flight to the US.
 
Please donate to help get Hoover the tiger, Cholita the bear and all the other animals saved during Operation Spirit of Freedom to their forever homes: www.ad-international.org/FreedomAppealUS or 323-935-2234.
 
More information about ADI’s Operation Spirit of Freedom
http://www.ad-international.org/SpiritofFreedom
 
South America circus bans: A two year undercover investigation by ADI from 2005 to 2007 led five countries in South America to ban wild animal circus acts – Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Paraguay and Colombia. In Central America, Mexico, El Salvador, Panama, and Costa Rica have also passed bans. Peru’s ban on wild animals in circuses was passed in 2012 following a successful campaign launched in 2007 by ADI and backed by local animal protection groups. Bolivia was the first South American country to ban wild animals in circuses and ADI was called in after most circuses defied the law. During its ‘Operation Lion Ark’ enforcement mission ADI raided eight illegal circuses in Bolivia rescuing all the animals including horses, dogs, coatis, monkeys, baboons and lions. ADI flew 25 lions to The Wild Animal Sanctuary in Colorado and 4 lions to California. The rescue is the subject of the multi-award-winning film Lion Ark. In August 2014, ADI began working with the Peruvian authorities to enforce its animal circus ban in a mission known as ‘Operation Spirit of Freedom’.
 
National restrictions on performing animals in travelling circuses, either wild, all animals, or in a handful of cases specific species have been enacted in 31 countries – Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, India, Israel, Malta, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Slovenia, Sweden, Taiwan, The Netherlands. Similar laws are under discussion in the UK, USA, Brazil and Chile.
 
Animal Defenders International
With offices in London, Los Angeles, Lima and Bogota, ADI campaigns across the globe on animals in entertainment, providing technical advice to governments, securing progressive animal protection legislation, drafting regulations and rescuing animals in distress. ADI has a worldwide reputation for providing video and photographic evidence exposing the behind-the-scenes suffering in industry and supporting this evidence with scientific research on captive wildlife and transport. ADI rescues animals all over the world, educates the public on animals and environmental issues. www.ad-international.org
 
www.wildanimalsanctuary.org

The Wild Animal Sanctuary (TWAS) is a 720 acre refuge in Keenesburg, Colorado, USA, for more than 350 rescued lions, tigers, bears, wolves and other large carnivores. ADI rescued 29 animals from circuses in Bolivia in 2010 and 2011 and the story of the 2011 seizure, rehabilitation and relocation of 25 of the lions to the TWAS is told in the movie, Lion Ark www.lionarkthemovie.com

20th Century Fox, Fox 2000 Pictures, Dune Entertainment, Rhythm and Hues and Ingenious Films present a PG, 127 minute, adventure, drama, directed by Ang Lee, screenplay by David Magee and novel by Yann Martel with a theater release date of November 21, 2012.

DreamWorks Animation presents a PG, approximately 95 minute animation, adventure, comedy in 3D, directed by Eric Darnell, Tom McGrath, Conrad Vernon, written by Eric Darnell and Noah Baumbach with a theatre release date of June 8, 2012.