Displaying items by tag: pets

“[A] beautifully written look at modern veterinary medicine…the bond between humans and animals—are explored in a series of chapters, each centering around a single case…Fincham-Gray, who also has an MFA in creative writing, has created a wonderfully introspective look at the role of the veterinarian.”

Booklist, STARRED REVIEW

“Affecting dispatches from the life of an animal doctor…Pet fanatics and animal lovers in general will savor these bittersweet stories exploring the enduring human-animal bond. A fervent, anecdotal memoir infused with heart, compassion, and a natural love for animals on every page.”

Kirkus Reviews

“The medical aspects of the narrative will likely draw future veterinarians to the book, but it’s the tales of Fincham-Gray’s patients that will keep general readers hooked.”  

Publisher’s Weekly

“Written with candor, humility, and humor, this memoir tells of the professional evolution of a veterinary medicine graduate to a more seasoned internal medicine practitioner. This compelling read is highly recommended for anyone interested in veterinary medicine or who has a love of animals.”

Library Journal

MY PATIENTS AND OTHER ANIMALS

A Veterinarian’s Stories of Love, Loss & Hope

 
   

 

SUZY FINCHAM-GRAY

A Spiegel & Grau Hardcover & eBook | On Sale April 10, 2018

A heartwarming literary debut, MY PATIENTS AND OTHER ANIMALS: A Veterinarian’s Stories of Love, Loss, and Hope (Spiegel & Grau; On Sale April 10) by Suzy Fincham-Gray, explores the relationships we share with the animals in our lives, and the decisions we must make when they become sick.

Since she was a young girl, Fincham-Gray knew she wanted to be a veterinarian. After graduating from school in London, she began a journey that would take her from her home along the English-Welsh border to an Emergency Room in inner-city Philadelphia, where she treated her first (but not last) dog rushed in with a gunshot wound, to eventually landing in San Diego, where she now works at a private practice. Throughout her career, she has collected thousands of stories that have shaped both her personal and professional life.

Each chapter of MY PATIENTS AND OTHER ANIMALS is centered around, and named after, an animal Fincham-Gray has treated, drawing readers into her consulting room and behind the scenes to understand the complex challenges veterinarians face. We meet, among others, Zeke, a 16lb silver-brown tabby who suddenly stops eating; Ned, a rescue dog from Mexico with an unexpected illness; and Sweetie, a young pit bull terrier, whose emotional story illustrates the lengths doctors and owners will go to save a pet. Each animal comes with an owner equally as memorable, who experience varying traumas of their own. Entwined with stories of her patients, Fincham-Gray shares intimate details about her own pets that found their way into her life when she least expected it, and when she needed them the most.

Throughout her life, Fincham-Gray has maintained a passion for writing and holds an MFA from the University of California, Riverside. As her veterinary career progressed, she discovered writing to be an outlet through which she could explore the intersection of art and science in veterinary medicine, and work through the ethical and moral dilemmas she faced at work.

Fincham-Gray says, “When I first considered writing a book I was determined not to write a memoir. However, as I explored the subjects that interested me, I returned again, and again, to the career I have pursued for almost thirty years. This journey has required that I take a deeper and clearer look at my role, whether as a veterinarian or as an owner, and I have come to understand more about human relationships through my patients. I am a different doctor now than when I started writing this book, and I continue to evolve, as I view the difficulties I face daily in a new way.”

Fincham-Gray offers a unique, insider perspective on caring for an animal, and writes with the same tenderness she brings to her patients. Rich in warmth and humor, MY PATIENTS AND OTHER ANIMALSis a memorable story about the compassion, healing, and joy that animals bring to our lives.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Suzy Fincham-Gray is a veterinary internal medicine specialist based in San Diego. She holds her Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine from The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, did her internship and residency at University of Pennsylvania, and holds an MFA from University of California, Riverside at Palm Desert. She lives in San Diego with her husband, daughter, three cats, and two dogs.

 

 
   

 

In an interview, Suzy Fincham-Gray can discuss:

The risks and rewards of international pet adoption: The transportation of homeless pets across the country and around the world has been on a significant rise over recent years. International rescue organizations, animal welfare groups, and concerned citizens have worked to bring animals in need to the U.S. for re-homing. As a result, thousands of animal lives have been saved, but there must be more awareness and education brought to the detection and spread of disease beyond natural geographic boundaries.

Why pure-bred dogs are causing a canine health crisis:While society encourages the search for the cutest, perfectly-sized, or most uniquely colored pure-breds, science tells a different story. Human-controlled canine breeding is leading to hundreds of serious, potentially fatal, diseases hidden in their genes, including debilitating orthopedic problems, difficulty breathing and premature death. Recent DNA testing has allowed more accurate warnings of such diseases, but with the fluctuation of canine trends such as, for example, the recent popularity of squashed-faced breeds like the French Bulldog, more knowledge must be had of potential consequences.

Understanding the financial burdens of healthcare, and knowing how much is too much to spend: In 2017, it was estimated that Americans spent over $69 billion on their pets with 23% going towards veterinary bills. Intensive medical care and high risk surgeries can run into thousands of dollars with the most advanced treatments costing significantly more. Insurance is currently not mandatory for anyone adopting a pet and there is no form of animal Medicaid to cover what owners cannot afford, leading euthanasia to be an all too common consequence of an owner’s financial limitations. Pet owners must monitor disease and set care goal boundaries to know when it’s ethically and financially time to end the life.

What are veterinary specialists, and why your pet might need one: In the United States, there are more than 11,000 veterinarians in 22 recognized specialties. Like humans, pets with more complicated diseases that require advanced diagnostics, such a laparoscopy or MRI scans, and treatments, including chemotherapy, blood transfusions, and neurosurgery, can be referred to a specialist. Increasingly, veterinary specialty hospitals are popping up in major metropolitan areas across the U.S., offering care previously only available in university veterinary hospitals.

The special needs of geriatric pets: Domestic animals are enjoying longer, healthier lives than ever before—the average canine life expectancy has doubled in the last four decades, and indoor cats are living twice as long, on average; But with extended longevity comes the responsibility of caring for older pets with specific health needs, knowing what signs to look for that may indicate disease, and understanding ways their lives need to be made more comfortable.

What pets can teach us about the euthanasia debate: Healthcare-by-proxy, where healthcare decision making is taken on by a patient’s loved ones, is increasingly relevant in today’s medical world. Humans are living longer than ever before with recent life-saving and life-extending measures pushing the boundaries of longevity, but where do we draw the line. Veterinarians, who must advocate for their patients while also considering the wishes of the pet’s family, have been faced with this dilemma for decades.

More Praise for MY PATIENTS AND OTHER ANIMALS

"Fincham-Gray writes beautifully and thoughtfully, giving readers rare insight to the making of a compassionate doctor. Her passion for both science and the animals she cares for, combined with her eloquence as a writer, made me want Suzy as both my dogs' veterinarian and my own friend. My Patients and Other Animals is a fascinating, heartwarming read."

Teresa Rhyne, author of the #1 New York Times Bestseller The Dog Lived (and So Will I) and The Dogs Were Rescued (and So Was I)

“Suzy Fincham-Gray's My Patients and Other Animals isn't just about one woman's love and care for animals and the people who love them, or about this veterinarian's big heart and deep intelligence, it's also about the ethical complexity of caring for other living beings, and a clear-eyed look at what binds us to other creatures of the world and why it matters. It's also about what it takes to have a humane heart, and how this makes all of us, pet owners or animal lovers or not, more human. A beautiful, tender, and magnificent read.”

Emily Rapp Black, New York Times Bestselling author of The Still Point of the Turning World and Poster Child: A Memoir

“[Suzy Fincham-Gray] writes extremely well, and her enthusiasm shines through on every page…I enjoyed reading this book, and while doing so I was made aware of the author’s absolute dedication to her work; like James Herriot she portrays her profession in a very good light.”

Jim Wight, author of The Real James Herriot: A Memoir of My Father

“If you have ever heard a cat purr or felt a dog lick your hand, you will find this poignant—and often exhilarating—story of a young veterinarian’s journey into the science of caring for animals an irresistible read. My Patients and Other Animals will break your heart, give you hope, and send you running to the nearest shelter to adopt a pet.”

Mark Haskell Smith, author of Naked at Lunch

“My Patients and Other Animals is a gem of a book. Dr. Suzy Fincham-Gray's nonstop life taking care of all sorts of nonhuman animals in need is a deeply inspirational and personal journey, a model for all, filled with joy, sorrow, tears, love, and loss. We are the lifeline for other animals—we try to keep them alive and thriving, and also have to make heart wrenching end-of-life decisions with their best interests in mind and in heart—and this beautifully written and moving diary of Fincham-Gray's selfless work clearly shows how the life of every single individual matters and that science can take us only so far. Love and heart are necessary when we work with others who are totally dependent on us. I can only hope that the nonhumans with whom I share my life and I will receive the care and love she brought to each and every animal who came her way. My Patients and Other Animals should be required reading for all students and practitioners of veterinary medicine.”

Marc Bekoff, coauthor of The Animals' Agenda: Freedom, Compassion, and Coexistence In the Human Age and author of Canine Confidential: Why Dogs Do What They Do

“This beautifully written book treads the narrow path between technical correctness and overly scientific terminology that endangers losing the reader. The passion that the author has for her patients and indeed for her vocation may be seen as a devotion bordering on an obsession. It is the story of a life of almost single minded love of the science of veterinary medicine and of care for the patients entrusted to her care. It should be read by all who care, whether for animals or humans, as it exemplifies how a life can be spent devoted to others, the pursuit of excellence, the moral and ethical dilemmas that scientific advances in treatments generate and above all the costs and benefits, mentally, physically and economically of the animal-human bond.” 

Peter Jinman, Emeritus President of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons and    Emeritus President of the British Veterinary Association

“If only Suzy Fincham-Gray treated people, too. My Patients and Other Animals is a book of great heart and compassion that speaks for the ones we love who never get to speak—at least not in words.

Part history, part memoir, part journey into the complicated questions we all face about life

and death and who has the power to control both.”

—Tod Goldberg, New York Times bestselling author of Gangsterland

"A beautifully written collection of memories, capturing the relationship between disease, humans,

animals, and a veterinarian's love to heal all."

Dr. Justine Lee, author of It’s a Cat’s World…You Just Live in It and It’s a Dog’s Life…but It’s Your Carpet

Delivery Scanning Technology Linked to Decrease from 2016

April 05, 2018 


http://www.facebook.com/uspsspacerTwitter @USPS

"Any dog can bite" poster

SAN DIEGO — The number of postal employees attacked by dogs nationwide reached 6,244 in 2017 — more than 500 fewer than 2016. Today, the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is showcasing technology that alerts mail carriers of potential attacks while releasing its annual list of cities where the most dog attacks were recorded. The organization also highlights safety initiatives to help protect its employees and offers tips to pet owners.

“We’re encouraged by the decrease in dog attacks,” said U.S. Postal Service Safety Director Linda DeCarlo in San Diego, where postal employees suffered 46 attacks — the fifth ranked city in 2017. “The totals are still too high, but we’re confident that with continuing education and dog bite prevention training, along with advancing technology, we can keep more people safe and keep attacks trending downward.”

Enhancing Employee Safety
DeCarlo highlights USPS safety measures that alert mail carriers to dogs on their delivery routes. The Package Pickup application on usps.com asks customers to indicate if there are dogs at their addresses when they schedule package pickups. This information is provided to carriers on their delivery scanners which send alerts if an unleashed dog is reported in a delivery area.

“The scanners that our carriers use to confirm a customer’s delivery include a feature for them to indicate the presence of a dog at an individual address,” said DeCarlo. “This information is particularly helpful for substitute carriers who fill in for regular carriers on their days off.”

 information provided to carriers on delivery scanner

DeCarlo is in San Diego Thursday, April 5, to kick off National Dog Bite Prevention Week, which runs Sunday, April 8, through Saturday, April 14. The Postal Service, joined by the American Humane, American Veterinary Medical Association, Insurance Information Institute and State Farm Insurance, is driving home the message that dog bites are a national issue and education can resolve the issue.

Half of the 4.5 million Americans bitten by dogs annually are children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

DeCarlo gave the following tips and encouraged sharing them using the hashtag #preventdogbites. A video on dog bite prevention tips is available on the Postal Service’s YouTube channel.

  • If a carrier delivers mail or packages to your front door, place your dog in a separate room and close that door before opening the front door. Some dogs burst through screen doors or plate-glass windows to attack visitors. Dog owners should keep the family pet secured.
  • Parents should remind their children and other family members not to take mail directly from carriers in the presence of the family pet, as the dog may view the person handing mail to a family member as a threatening gesture.
  • The Postal Service places the safety of its employees as a top priority. If a carrier feels threatened by a dog, or if a dog is loose or unleashed, the owner may be asked to pick up mail at a Post Office until the carrier is assured the pet has been restrained. If a dog is roaming the neighborhood, the pet owner’s neighbors also may be asked to pick up their mail at the area’s Post Office.

American Humane, the country’s first national humane organization, estimates that more than 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year with 800,000 seeking medical attention for these bites — more than half of them being children.

“Two-thirds of the injuries occurring in children four years or younger are to the head or neck region, and studies have also shown that the greatest percentage of dog-bite fatalities occurred among children and unsupervised newborns left with dogs — something that should never occur,” said Mark Stubis, chief communications officer, American Humane.  “To help, American Humane offers a free online booklet, ‘Pet Meets Baby,’ with valuable information on introducing a new child to a home with a pet — or a new pet into a home with a child available for families with children.”

Insurance company State Farm reports that in 2017, it paid more than $132 million as a result of 3,618 dog-related injury claims. The average cost paid per claim was $36,573. “State Farm is also one of the few insurance companies that does not exclude homeowner or renter insurance coverage because of the breed of dog owned,” said Heather Paul, State Farm public affairs specialist. “The company reinforces that responsible pet ownership and educating children about how to safely interact with dogs is key to reducing dog bites.”

“Veterinarians see firsthand the needless heartbreak a dog bite can cause,” said Dr. Mike Topper, AVMA President. “We know that dog bites are not a breed-specific issue and that any dog can bite. We also know that most bites can be prevented through education. Your veterinarian and the AVMA have extensive resources designed to keep your pup, no matter what their breed, a happy, healthy member of your family and community.

2017 Dog Attack Rankings by City
A total of 6,244 postal employees were attacked by dogs in 2017. The top 30 city rankings are below. Some cities share the same rankings as they experienced the same number of attacks.

 

Office City

Office State

CY-17

CY-16

1  

HOUSTON

TX

71

62

2  

LOS ANGELES

CA

67

80

3  

ST LOUIS

MO

52

31

4  

CLEVELAND

OH

49

60

5  

SAN DIEGO

CA

46

57

6  

BALTIMORE

MD

44

36

6  

SAN ANTONIO

TX

44

42

7  

COLUMBUS

OH

43

39

8  

DALLAS

TX

40

41

9  

LOUISVILLE

KY

39

51

10 

CHICAGO

IL

38

46

11 

DENVER

CO

35

47

12 

LONG BEACH

CA

32

22

12 

DETROIT

MI

32

48

12 

KANSAS CITY

MO

32

30

13 

OAKLAND

CA

28

23

13 

SEATTLE

WA

28

31

14 

MINNEAPOLIS

MN

27

43

14 

CHARLOTTE

NC

27

33

14 

PHILADELPHIA

PA

27

40

15 

SAN JOSE

CA

26

21

15 

FORT WORTH

TX

26

33

16 

MIAMI

FL

25

15

16 

INDIANAPOLIS

IN

25

44

16 

ROCHESTER

NY

25

11

16 

CINCINNATI

OH

25

24

16 

TOLEDO

OH

25

18

17 

PHOENIX

AZ

24

35

17 

SACRAMENTO

CA

24

30

17 

PORTLAND

OR

24

41

The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.

# # #

For National Dog Bite Prevention Week® (April 8 -14),
American Humane Offers Tips to Stay Safe All Year Round

 
 
 

WASHINGTON, April 5, 2018 – Every year more than 4.5 million Americans, more than half of them children, are bitten by dogs.  As part of the National Dog Bite Prevention Week® coalition, American Humane, the country’s first national humane organization, encourages adults to protect both children and dogs, and learn the importance of pet owner responsibility.

            “Dogs are our best friends, providing love, comfort and protection,” says Dr. Robin Ganzert, president and CEO of American Humane. “But it’s up to us humans to be good friends to them as well by protecting everyone around us – ourselves, our kids, and our dogs – from the dangers and consequences of dog bites.”

Dogs can bite for many reasons, including improper care and/or a lack of socialization.  All dogs, even well-trained, gentle dogs, are capable of biting however when provoked, especially when eating, sleeping or caring for puppies. Thus, even when a bite is superficial or classified as “provoked,” dogs may be abandoned or euthanized. Therefore, it’s vitally important to keep both children and dogs safe by preventing dog bites wherever possible.

         ��  “A dog bite can have a profound effect not only on the victim, but on the dog, who may be euthanized, and the dog’s owners who have to cope with the loss of a beloved family member,” said Dr. Kwane Stewart, Chief Veterinary Officer for American Humane’s “No Animals Were Harmed®” program, speaking at the National Dog Bite Prevention Week Coalition kick-off event in San Diego on April 5. “All those who have a canine companion need to make sure they know the steps they can take to prevent their dog from biting someone.”

            To reduce the number of injuries to people and the risk of relinquishment of dogs who bite, American Humane offers the following suggestions:

For Children:

  • Never approach an unknown dog or a dog that is alone without an owner, and always ask for permission before petting the dog.
  • Never approach an injured animal – find an adult who can get the help s/he needs
  • Never approach a dog that is eating, sleeping or nursing puppies.
  • Don’t poke, hit, pull, pinch or tease a dog.

For Dog Owners:

  • Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog, even if it is a family pet.
  • Interactions between children and dogs should always be monitored to ensure the safety of both your child and your dog.
  • Teach your children to treat the dog with respect and not to engage in rough or aggressive play.
  • Make sure your pet is socialized as a young puppy so it feels at ease around people and other animals.
  • Never put your dog in a position where s/he feels threatened.
  • Walk and exercise your dog regularly to keep him/her healthy and to provide mental stimulation.
  • Use a leash in public to ensure you are able to control your dog.
  • Regular veterinary care is essential to maintain your dog’s health; a sick or injured dog is more likely to bite.
  • Be alert, if someone approaches you and your dog - caution them to wait before petting the dog, give your pet time to be comfortable with a stranger.

American Humane also offers a free online booklet available for families with children called “Pet Meets Baby,” providing valuable information on introducing a new child to a home with a pet – or a new pet into a home with a child: http://www.americanhumane.org/interaction/programs/humane-education/pet-meets-baby.html.

Consider these statistics and tips provided by National Dog Bite Prevention Week® Coalition members:

 

 
About American Humane
American Humane is the country’s first national humane organization, founded in 1877. For more information, please visit www.americanhumane.org today. 

ALT-VET: THE REVOLUTIONARY PET CARE AND LONGEVITY SOLUTION BY DR. VARGAS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (Winter Haven,Fl ) – Alt-Vet: The Revolutionary Pet Care and Longevity Solution by Dr. Vargas, offers a new way to look at alternative pet care and is available for sale at Amazon.com and book stores everywhere.

Alt-Vet: The Revolutionary Pet Care and Longevity Solution shares with readers Alt-Vet- The Revolutionary Pet Care and Longevity Solution. explores the alternative therapies that are available to your pet through a network of alternative veterinary medicine practitioners throughout the country, but offers some simple and safe therapies you can do at home with your pet that will them maintain a high level of health and happiness. TCVM is not some new concept- it has been practiced for thousands of years, yet surprisingly, many Americans have not heard of it or tried it with their pet.

Alt-Vet contains real life stories of animals that have been brought to my clinic by pet owners that were looking for some hope of saving their animal, reducing their pain, and increasing their quality of life. Many of those pet owners come in skeptics and leave believers. Alt-Vet offers chapters on pet massage, healing diets and emergency response care. The techniques offered are low cost and simple to implement.

.

Dr. Vargas is excited to share with readers:

  • Alternative treatment options for your pet's care
  • Massage techniques for pet owners
  • Discussion on herbal remedies that can be used as home therapies
  • Simple recipes and advice about food therapy for ailing pets
  • Exposing the facts about risks and benefit of vaccinating your pet

About The Author:

Dr Vargas received her DVM from Tuskegee University in 1994. In 1996 she established her AAHA accredited Orchid Springs Animal Hospital in Winter Haven, FL. In 2009 she started her studies at Chi Institute, eventually garnering certifications in Acupuncture, Chinese Herbal medicine, Food therapy and Tui Na. She is an assistant teacher at both Chi Institute campuses in Florida and Latin America. Dr Vargas is currently completing a Master's Degree in TCVM. In addition she has worked as a TCVM consultant for Disney Animal Kingdom.

Dr. Vargas is also a sought out speaker and has presented at the Ferret International Congress in 2008, AVMA convention in 2011 and the World TCVM Congress in 2015,2016,2017, AAVA conference 2017 & 2018 and Veterinary Partners Conference in 2018. She is a certified veterinary journalist and has published hundreds of articles including her bi-weekly Lakeland Ledger newspaper pet care column. Dr Vargas is a prolific author of both scientific and motivational articles. She is a guest blogger for Allthingshealing.com and a writer for Woman to Woman Magazine. She also wrote a chapter on Jack Canfield’s Amazon Best seller book “The Soul of Success”. She served as an AVMA Spokesperson for Hispanic market and has recorded many PSA’s and radio interviews promoting responsible pet ownership.

Her passion for helping animals and her voluntarism has awarded her state and national recognition. Among her awards are the Purina National Pet Care Award, Bay News 9 Medical Hero Award, Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce Business Award, Brighthouse Regional Business Finalist, Girls Inc “She knows where she is going award” and the FVMA Gold award. She was honored by the American Veterinary Foundation as "America's Favorite Veterinarian" in 2015 and by the Florida Veterinary Medical Association’s Veterinarian of the Year Award in 2018.

She lives in sunny Winter Haven, Fl with her husband, her two daughters and a menagerie of pets.

About Motivational Press:

Motivational Press is a global leader in the field of general interest publishing, dedicated to providing the best in nonfiction for consumers of all ages, across all printed, electronic, and audio formats. Motivational Press is a broad-based publisher with strengths in business books, self-help books, health, wellness, sports, narrative nonfiction, reference, pop culture, design, and religious and spiritual books. Motivational Press is consistently at the forefront of innovation, using digital technology to create unique reading experiences and expand the reach of its authors. Its divisions include Motivational Press Adult Publishing, Motivational Press Children’s Publishing, Motivational Press Audio, Motivational Press Digital and international companies in Australia, Canada, Germany, Brazil and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit www.MotivationalPress.com.

[category 2] [tag Dr. Vargas, Alt-Vet: The Revolutionary Pet Care and

Longevity Solution, ]

New program: Young Writers on the Web

DWAA is excited to encourage the next generation of writers with a new program called Young Writers on the Web. Writers who are under 18 years old are encouraged to submit stories about dogs for possible publication on a special section of the DWAA website, and potentially in our newsletter Ruff Drafts as space allows.

We’re thrilled that experienced journalist and editor Mara Bovsun, features editor at AKC Family Dog, will edit submissions and work with young writers to help polish their work for publication. The chance to work with a professional of Mara’s caliber is a fantastic opportunity for budding writers!

Articles published by the program will be eligible as entries for DWAA’s annual writing competition. This is great news since Karen Petit, a prolific author of children’s books, sponsors a special award just for writers under 18 years old. It’s a wonderful chance to receive recognition and win $400!

 

DWAA Junior Writer Award

Sponsored by Karen Petit, an author of children’s books, for writers under 18 years of age. This award is to recognize and encourage young writers who exhibit talent, resourcefulness, dedication and integrity in their writing about dogs and dog-related topics. Award: $400 cash grant, DWAA Maxwell Medallion and lapel pin.
 

Please feel free to share this email with teachers, parents and young people who might be interested! For more information, visit:  

Young Writers on the Web
Facebook
Twitter
Website

How Canine Hip Dysplasia May Unlock the Mysteries of Human DDH

Modern medicine is increasingly turning to pets for answers, and when it comes to understanding the poor development of hips prone to dislocation, dogs may play an important part to gaining further insight. A December 2017 study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research positioned canine hip dysplasia (CHD) as a model to help scientists better understand developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in humans. Here's what you need to know:

What Is Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD)?

Canine hip dysplasia, or CHD, is a condition where a dog's hips are improperly developed. It causes the hip to get loose and deteriorate as your dog ages. It's a hereditary condition that's common in large breed dogs, too. Dog breeds that are prone to this condition include German Shepherds, Labrador retrievers, Great Danes, Irish Setters, and St. Bernards. However, small and medium-sized dogs can experience CHD, too. External factors, such as the weight of your dog, his diet, and excessive growth, impact CHD.

How CHD Is Treated

There are a number of treatments that can help manage pain and other ailments that come along with canine hip dysplasia. For example, your pet can receive physical therapy and surgery to correct CHD. You can also use discount pet medication, including the Carprofen Caplets, offered via reputable online pet pharmacies and medication suppliers, such as Allivet.

What Is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) in Humans and How Is It Treated?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip in humans is a condition that is most commonly identified during birth and can also develop during the first year of a person's life. It involves an improperly developed hip joint, which can lead to a dislocated, dislocatable, or loose hip. It's also linked to pain in the hip and secondary osteoarthritis or OA. It also can limit your movements.

This condition can be treated non-surgically by repositioning the thigh bone with a special harness. However, surgery is often necessary the older a DDH patient gets or if the repositioning of the thighbone is unsuccessful. While surgery has certainly improved the results of the condition over the last 10 years, scientists still lack a full understanding of the causes and effects of the condition, the diseases common behaviors, and how changes in cells' and tissues' mechanical properties and physical forces play a role in the development of DDH.

How CHD and DDH Link

Scientists believe that by studying CHD, they can find an answer to not only the specific paths of that start the degeneration of hip joints of those with DDH but also plausible alternative treatments. Links between CHD and DDH provide insight. Here are some commonalities between both diseases:

  • Both are hereditary and Pre-OA. Just as CHD is hereditary, DDH also is likely to run in families. Also, if CHD is not treated, it can progress into OA, similar to how untreated DDH can progress into secondary OA.
  • CHD and DDH approaches to treatment share similarities. The approach to treating CHD and DDH is similar. Both humans and dogs can modify their diet and movement to better manage the condition. Surgery is also an option for both dogs and humans.
  • Weight plays an important role. Treating DDH by managing weight is similar to the treatment of CHD. That's because extra weight adds extra pressure on the joint in the case of both dogs and people. Losing weight can help reduce this pressure and the discomfort that comes along with it.

Turning to Your Pet for Answers

Looking to your family history for answers to current conditions and diseases may not be the only option to unlocking life's mysteries of modern science. Modern science is turning to your pet. Using CHD as a model and understanding CHD it may uncover valuable insight that leads to better treatment options in DDH.

Lannie, writer for Allivet. Allivet provides affordable pet supplies and pet medications, all of which can be purchased online. Listed below are some helpful resources referenced in the article that can provide some guidance for those looking for helpful information on pet supplies & medication:

http://www.allivet.com/p-5632-carprofen-caplets.aspx

MediaVista Public Relations         NEWS RELEASE

PIONEER IN HOLLYWOOD PET-SITTING INDUSTRY RELEASES TALES OF CELEBRITY FUR KID LOVE

 

Funny and Full of Business Savvy Advice,
The Pet Sitter’s Tale is Currently Available on Amazon

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

 

Los Angeles(November 20, 2017) – Laura Vorreyer releases her book, “The Pet Sitter’s Tale,” (AuthorHouse) which was fifteen years in the making. Now available on Amazon, AuthorHouse.com and through Barnes & Noble’s website, this collection of short stories was gathered throughout Laura’s years with the company she built herself, Your Dog’s Best Friend. The book is filled with laugh-out-loud anecdotes and practical business advice.

With an impossibly determined and dogged will, Laura moved from Chicago to Los Angeles to become a make-up artist in the film and television industry. Knowing nobody in the city and with no road map to success, she stumbled upon her true passion of pet-sitting in the most hilarious and Hollywood-style manner.

“The Pet Sitter’s Tale” paints a vivid picture of what it’s like to witness, and be a willing participant of, the pampered life of a celebrity’s dog. Laura is always compassionate and understanding of the eccentricities of pet-parents as she tells her tales of overly-protective, dog-obsessed clients. She also adds helpful business advice as she recounts stories about the tough task of hiring good people in wacky Hollywood.

Each chapter in “The Pet Sitter’s Tale” begins with an introductory photo of an actual canine client, in order to highlight just exactly why they inspire such loyalty.

About her road to her career, Laura explains, “I have been many other things, but none as satisfying or rewarding as a caretaker for other living creatures.” Anybody who has loved a four-legged furry family member can relate and will laugh and cry along with Laura’s compilation of stories of her fifteen years in business.

About “The Pet Sitter’s Tale”

From the time she was a young girl growing up in Chicago to unintentionally becoming a professional pet sitter in Los Angeles, “The Pet Sitter’s Tale” is Laura Vorreyer’s collection of stories about her love affair with pets. Each story is infused with her unique sense of humor and observations about the foibles and adventures of furry children and their human counterparts.

Filling multiple roles as animal expert, companion, therapist, and friend, Laura muses over her client’s pet obsessions while always lending a compassionate ear. Both poignant and humorous, “The Pet Sitter’s Tale” will amuse anyone who’s ever had their heartstrings tugged by a cute pet.

 

About Laura Vorreyer

Laura Vorreyer is an entrepreneur, who pioneered the dog walking industry, and author. She is the owner of Your Dog’s Best Friend, a premier dog walking and pet-sitting business in Los Angeles. Laura is also a passionate advocate for animal rights and is dedicated to pet rescue. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband, son and their dog, Dexter.

About AuthorHouse:
AuthorHouse is the leading provider of supported self-publishing services for authors around the globe, with over 90,000 titles released.

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The executive director of Clean Label Project, Jaclyn Bowen, MPH, MS will comment on the recent discovery of pentobarbital — the barbiturate euthanasia drug used to kill animals by veterinarians and animal shelters — in Gravy Train Dog Food products.
Results for 99 pet foods that were tested for pentobarbital have been published on its website today at cleanlabelproject.org
In 2017, Clean Label Project released a study after testing nearly 1,000 of the bestselling pet food products for 130+ environmental and industrial contaminants including heavy metals, BPA, pesticides, and other toxins. The results revealed high levels of lead (up to 5,450 PPB), arsenic (up to 5,550 PPB), cadmium (up to 3,512 PPB) and other toxins.
All of the blind data from the individual tests is published here: cleanlabelproject.org/pet-food-heavy-metals-blinded-raw-data/
All of the products tested are also rated via a 5-star rating system and readily available at cleanlabelproject.org.

 

Talkin' Pets News

January 20, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Zach Budin

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Lora Dunn, Director of the Criminal Justice Program for the ALDF will join Jon and Talkin' Pets tp dicuss the Best and Worst States in Animal Protection 

Anna Raimondi is a grief counselor, spiritual advisor, and medium and will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 1/20/18 at 630pm EST to discuss and give away her book "Conversations with Mary"  

Author of The Pet Loss Companion, Ken Dolan-Del Vecchio will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 01/20/18 at 720pm EST to discuss and give away his book on pet loss

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