Displaying items by tag: pets

TALKIN PETS News

Saturday, Aug. 20, the 232nd day of 2011.
There are 133 days left in the year.

SEAACA & Pet-Connections to Provide No-Cost Spay & Neuter Programs for Owned Free-Roaming Cats

(LOS ANGELES, CA) August 11, 2011 - SEAACA (Southeast Area Animal Control Authority; www.seaaca.org) and Pet-Connections are helping cat owners who live in the 14 cities served by SEAACA with the BIG MEOW, a compelling program to provide no-cost spay and neuter serviced for owned free-roaming cats. The year long, national program kicks off at SEAACA on August 17 with photo opportunities during cat drop-off (7:15 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.) and pick-up (2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.). 



SEAACA and Pet-Connections will offer a variety of services for owned free-roaming cats at absolutely no cost to cat owners. Services include spay or neuter, microchip ID (so cats have permanent ID in addition to a collar), vaccines (FVRCP and rabies), one month application of flea and tick control and basic health care at the time of surgery. 



The BIG MEOW is a significant step in improving cat health and curtailing overpopulation. Spayed or neutered cats tend to want to stay inside with their families. Cats that roam, however, can get lost, hit by passing cars, be exposed to pesticides, poisons or unhealthy plants and disturb neighbors. Moreover, an un-spayed female cat, her mate and all of their offspring, producing two litters per year, with 2.8 surviving kittens per litter, can result in thousands of cats (over 2,000 cats in four years and over 370,000 cats in seven years!).



“The BIG MEOW delivers monumental benefits for everyone,” noted SEAACA Executive Director, Dan Morrison. “It helps owned free-roaming cats lead safer, healthier lives. It also helps manage the surplus cat problem, and the no-cost element helps personal finances in tough economic times,” he added.
 

The Big Meow will result in over 50 surgeries at SEAACA on the “kick-off day” (August 17) with partner veterinarians in private practice performing another 100 to 150 surgeries on that day; the annual goal for SEAACA is 3,000 surgeries. The Inland Valley Humane Society is concurrently doing the same program. 



In order to participate in the BIG MEOW, cats must be four months to seven years of age. Only owned free-roaming cats are eligible (no feral or wild cats will be accepted). Additionally, cat owners must provide proof of residency in SEAACA service cities and each cat must be in a properly secured kennel or carrier.



For more information about the BIG MEOW or SEAACA, please visit www.seaaca.org, or call the appointment line at 562-803-3301 ext. 251.   

About SEAACA 

SEAACA (Southeast Area Animal Control Authority) provides animal care and control services for 14 cities in southeast Los Angeles County and northern Orange County, including Bell Gardens, Bellflower, Buena Park, Downey, Lakewood, La Palma, Montebello, Norwalk, Paramount, Pico Rivera, Santa Fe Springs, South El Monte, South Gate and Vernon. SEAACA's Animal Care Center located in Downey reunites pet owners with lost pets and assists new pet owners with pet adoptions. SEAACA’s Animal Wellness Clinic, also located in Downey, spays and neuters all adoption animals plus provides vaccinations and microchipping to the general public. For more information about SEAACA, please visitwww.seaaca.org.



About Pet-Connections

Pet Connections, Inc. is a national organization dedicated to developing coalitions between pet owners, community leaders and animal welfare organizations to reduce the number of stray and unwanted cats and dogs.
 
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TALKIN PETS News
Today is Saturday, Aug. 13, the 225th day of 2011.
There are 140 days left in the year.

Shelters Competing to Save More Lives, Earn More Than $300,000 in Prize Grants


NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced that more than 3,000 pets were adopted or reunited with their owners during the first seven days of the 2011 ASPCA $100K Challenge, a three-month competition where 49 shelters from 33 states and territories across the United States are working to increase lives saved in order to win some of the $300,000 in ASPCA prize grants, including a grand prize of $100,000.

During the first week of the ASPCA $100K Challenge, contestants held special adoption events around the country in an effort to kick off to a strong start in the competition. Many contestants stayed open around the clock for 24-hour adoption events, offered unique promotions and discounts on adoption fees, and more.

“Many shelters shattered their own records for most adoptions in a day or a week, and in so doing they used this contest to shatter the perception of what’s possible. Staff and volunteers are more energized than ever to keep saving more lives,” said Bert Troughton, vice president of community outreach for the ASPCA.

During the 2011 ASPCA $100K Challenge, contestants will compete to save at least 300 more animals—during the months of August, September, and October 2011—than they did over the same three-month period in 2010. The shelter with the biggest increase in animals saved will win a $100,000 grant. The agency that gets the most community members involved in saving animals will win a $25,000 grant, and those organizations that do the best in their regions will be eligible for between $5,000 and $25,000 in grants. In last year’s first-ever ASPCA $100K Challenge, contestants saved a total of 48,779 lives over three months – an increase of 7,362 lives over the same three months in 2009.

It has long been a priority of the ASPCA to create a country of humane communities where there is no more euthanasia of homeless animals simply because of a lack of space or the resources to adequately care for them. The ASPCA $100K Challenge builds on that goal by inspiring shelters and their communities to innovate and act to save more animals.

For more information about the contest, please visit http://challenge.aspcapro.org. To locate a 2011 ASPCA $100K Challenge contestant near you, please visit http://challenge.aspcapro.org/challenge/contestants. To see a complete list of 2011 $100K Challenge events as they are scheduled, please stay tuned to http://challenge.aspcapro.org/shelter/events/all throughout the contest.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. One million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org. To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to www.twitter.com/aspca.
 

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TALKIN PETS NEWS
Saturday, Aug. 6, the 218th day of 2011.
There are 147 days left in the year.

 
  Pet inheritance: The trouble with Trouble’s money
 
 

August 4, 2011

 
 

Estate planning with Fido in mind? Better be careful, says a trusts and estates expert at Washington University in St. Louis School of Law.

 

The issue has been in the news recently. British fashion designer Alexander McQueen, who died in February, left a sizeable sum of money to his beloved dogs; Trouble, the recently deceased dog of “The Queen of Mean,” Leona Helmsley, famously inherited $12 million.

Beyond celebrities, a powerful pet inheritance constituency thrives. Between 12-27 percent of owners have provisions for their pets in their wills. But what happens to the inheritance when the pet passes?

“Poor Trouble already had her bequest reduced to $2 million among other problems with the inheritance,” says Adrienne Davis, JD, the William M. Van Cleve Professor of Law at Washington University in St. Louis.

“The remainder of Trouble’s money will go to Helmsley’s charitable trust. And yet, the legal issues do not end there. Typically gifts to charitable trusts, including remainders such as this one, would qualify for a tax deduction. However tax law excludes charitable remainders following pet trusts from qualifying.”

Davis notes that there is one final anti-pet outrage in Trouble’s case. In addition to reducing Helmsley’s gift to Trouble, the probate judge overturned Helmsley’s directive that her charitable trust be used for animal welfare, instead permitting the trustees to distribute Helmsley’s assets to non-animal charities of their own choosing.

“Although pet inheritance in America was recognized in 1923, and despite several recent innovations, the law remains unstable,” Davis says.

“One basic problem is that estate planning attorneys and their clients do not take advantage of the substantial legal reforms that have come in the last decade. Trusts must be properly drafted and should name caretakers who are willing to comply with the trust terms. If a final resting place is desired, lawyers should check that it will accept pets.”

Helmsley’s final request for Trouble, that she be buried beside Helmsley in the family mausoleum, cannot be fulfilled as pets cannot be buried in human cemeteries.

Davis says that other reforms are still needed.

“One proposed bill would extend the charitable remainder tax deduction to pet trusts,” she says.

“Other reforms would make it easier to create trusts for future generations, or ‘grand-kid pets.’ That ‘companion’ feeling has spilled over owners’ lifetimes into their estate plans, with no end in sight.”

Frances Foster, JD, trusts and estates scholar and the Edward T. Foote II Professor of Law at WUSTL School of Law, tackles the issue of pet inheritance reform in her recent Florida Law Review article, “Should Pets Inherit.”

“Trouble — and the millions of American pets like her — should inherit,” Foster says.

“American inheritance law is trapped in an outdated family paradigm. That paradigm assumes that the decedent’s closest relatives by blood, adoption or marriage are the most deserving recipients of the decedent’s estate, the so-called ‘natural objects of the decedent’s bounty.’ For many Americans today though, their pets, not their human family members, are their nearest and dearest.”

Foster argues that the idea of ‘natural’ wealth distribution permeates law and decisionmaking and creates significant human costs.

“By ignoring the actual relationships between decedents and survivors, the family paradigm excludes the very people a particular decedent may have valued most — those connected by affection and support rather than by family status,” she says.

Foster notes that recent reforms have focused on enforcing pet care arrangements on an ad hoc basis, improving legal mechanisms to provide for decedents’ pets and redefining the legal status of pets.

“But these strategies offer only partial solutions because they fail to challenge the family paradigm,” she says.

“Reformers must look beyond the family paradigm’s abstractions and develop more individualized approaches that encompass a decedent’s actual natural objects ― be they human or nonhuman.”
 

URL: http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/22546.aspx

Anyone who has pets will really like this. You'll like it even if you haven't and you may even decide you need one!
Mary and her husband Jim had a dog named Lucky.

 

Lucky was a real character. Whenever Mary and Jim had company come for a weekend visit they would warn their friends to not leave their luggage open because Lucky would help himself to whatever struck his fancy.  Inevitably, someone would forget and something would come up missing.

Mary or Jim would go to Lucky's toy box in the basement and there the treasure would be, amid all of Lucky's other favorite toys. Lucky always stashed his finds in his toy box and he was very particular that his toys stay in the box..

It happened that Mary found out she had breast cancer. Something told her she was going to die of this disease....in fact; she was just sure it was fatal.

She scheduled the double mastectomy, fear riding her shoulders. The night before she was to go to the hospital she cuddled with Lucky. A thought struck her...what would happen to Lucky?

 

Although the three-year-old dog liked Jim, he was Mary's dog through and through. If I die, Lucky will be abandoned, Mary thought. He won't understand that I didn't want to leave him! The thought made her sadder than thinking of her own death.

The double mastectomy was harder on Mary than her doctors had anticipated and Mary was hospitalized for over two weeks. Jim took Lucky for his evening walk faithfully, but the little dog just drooped, whining and miserable.

Finally the day came for Mary to leave the hospital. When she arrived home, Mary was so exhausted she couldn't even make it up the steps to her bedroom.. Jim made his wife comfortable on the couch and left her to nap..

Lucky stood watching Mary but he didn't come to her when she called. It made Mary sad but sleep soon overcame her and she dozed.

When Mary woke for a second she couldn't understand what was wrong. She couldn't move her head and her body felt heavy and hot. But panic soon gave way to laughter when Mary realized the problem. She was covered, literally blanketed, with every treasure Lucky owned!

 

While she had slept, the sorrowing dog had made trip after trip to the basement bringing his beloved mistress all his favorite things in life.

He had covered her with his love.

 

Mary forgot about dying. Instead she and Lucky began living again, walking further and further together every day. It's been 12 years now and Mary is still cancer-free. Lucky, he still steals treasures and stashes them in his toy box but Mary remains his greatest treasure..

Remember......live every day to the fullest. Each minute is a blessing. And never forget....the people who make a difference in our lives are not the ones with the most credentials, the most money, or the most awards. They are the ones that care for us.

Live simply.. Love seriously. Care deeply. Speak kindly. Leave the rest to the dog.

 

 

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