Displaying items by tag: The Florida Aquarium

 

TAMPA, Fla., Friday, May 3, 2019– For the second year in a row, The Florida Aquarium has been nationally recognized as one of North America’s best aquariums, taking the number two spot in USA TODAY’S 10Best Readers’ Choice Awards, up from number three last year. 

A panel of experts selected 20 of the best aquariums in North America, and the top 10 winners were determined by popular vote. Nominees were selected for providing a fun and educational setting and high-quality exhibits and visitor interactions, as well as playing a vital role in animal conservation by taking part in rescue efforts and advocating for the health of our oceans.

“The Florida Aquarium is a Tampa gem and a cultural and conservation leader in the region. They understand that their best chapter is yet to be written and this honor is proof that exciting things are in store for them and the city they call home,” said City of Tampa Mayor Jane Castor.

More than 800,000 guests visit The Florida Aquarium every year, making it one of Tampa Bay’s most-attended cultural attractions, and a vital economic contributor. The Aquarium welcomes more than 100,000 students each year, saves sea life across the country—primarily focusing on endangered sea turtle rescue and rehabilitation and coral reef restoration—and has partnered with several community and neighborhood organizations. Recently the Aquarium reopened its second largest exhibit, the Heart of the Sea, and its Waves of Wonder gallery. The Aquarium is opening a new jelly touch experience, Moon Bay, in early summer at its downtown Tampa location. 

“Our City and region are second to none and deserve a world-class Aquarium that our community and State can be proud of. To receive this prestigious recognition based on our community’s overwhelming support is both humbling and an honor,” said Roger Germann, President & CEO. “Every day we strive to offer the best experiences for all guests, provide the best care for our animals, educate schoolchildren, save wildlife, and give back to our community. On behalf of The Florida Aquarium, I would like to thank everyone in the Tampa Bay area and across the country for recognizing their favorite Aquarium.”

Located in the Channel District, in the heart of the City’s redevelopment efforts of Water Street Tampa and Sparkman Wharf, The Florida Aquarium has served Tampa Bay residents as a premier non-profit cultural attraction since it opened its doors in 1995. 

 
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The Florida Aquarium is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization whose mission is to entertain, educate and inspire stewardship of the natural environment, and a vision to protect and restore our blue planet.
Copyright © 2019. The Florida Aquarium. All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
701 Channelside Dr, Tampa, FL 33602

Talkin' Pets News

April 20, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guest - Carol Novella author of "Mutual Rescue" How adopting a homeless Animal Can Save You, Too will join Jon and Talkin' Pets to discuss and give away her new book

 

Care Center has one of the State’s deepest turtle-exclusive dive pools

 

Tampa, FL – The Florida Aquarium officially opened its $4.1 million Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Center in Apollo Beach today. The two story, 19,000-square-foot center features five different rehabilitation pools including one of the state’s deepest turtle-exclusive dive pool with observation window.

“We rescue sea turtles from around Florida and beyond, but during winter months, there is a growing need for more animal care facilities to rehabilitate cold stunned sea turtles,” said The Florida Aquarium President and CEO Roger Germann. “This center is opening at the right time, and The Florida Aquarium will be able to dramatically increase the number of sea turtles it cares for during the year.”

The pools at the new care center range in size from 1,500 to 25,000-gallons. The sea turtle dive pool, which reaches a depth of 11-feet, will be used to assess buoyancy issues, swim conditioning and food trials before turtles are cleared by FWC to be returned back into the wild.

The center also includes a state-of-the-art sea turtle surgery suite.

“We believe we have a responsibility to be good stewards of our environment and the animals that depend on it, and this investment will only help us further our mission of protecting and restoring our fragile Blue Planet,” Germann added. 

The Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Center was made possible through a unique public-private partnership consisting of groups who all shared the same common goal of working to achieve and maintain healthy sea turtle populations. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), contributed $3 million, The Spurlino Foundation and others donated $690,000, The Florida Aquarium contributed more than $400,000 and TECO Energy helped make the center a reality through a generous land use agreement.

We are grateful to continue to expand our partnership with such a world class facility like The Florida Aquarium,” said FWC Executive Director Eric Sutton. “We look forward to further work together on sea turtle conservation, coral research and more.”

 

The Florida Aquarium’s Animal Response Team, that manages sea turtle rescue, rehabilitation and release efforts, has recently been expanded, thanks to a $250,000 grant from Florida Blue.

 

Since opening its door, The Florida Aquarium has helped rescue and rehab more than 150 threatened or endangered turtles. The Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Center will only ensure that number grows.

DID YOU KNOW:

  • Roughly 90% of all sea turtle nesting in the United States takes place on Florida’s beaches.
  • There are seven different species of sea turtles including Flatback, Green, Hawksbill, Kemp’s Ridley, Leatherback, Loggerhead and Olive Ridley.
  • Of the six sea turtle species found in U.S. waters or that nest on U.S. Beaches, all are designated as either threatened or endangered.
  • Some sea turtles can live up to 50-years or longer.
  • Leatherback sea turtles can travel more than 10,000 miles every year.
  • Green sea turtles can stay underwater for up to five hours.

 

About The Florida Aquarium

The Florida Aquarium is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit institution whose mission is to entertain, educate andinspire stewardship about our natural environment.  It has been voted a Top 3 Aquarium in North America by the readers of USA Today (May 2018), it’s earned a Trip Advisor Hall of Fame Rating (2018).  The Florida Aquarium has also earned a 4-Star rating from Charity Navigator and been awarded a platinum rating from GuideStar.

 

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The Florida Aquarium, a nonprofit organization, was recently awarded a 4-star rating by Charity Navigator, America's largest and most-utilized independent evaluator of charities. The coveted 4-star rating, the highest possible rating, is only awarded to the most fiscally responsible organizations.The Florida Aquarium is among the top ten highest rated aquariums in the U.S.
 
Charity Navigator, which rates about 8,000 charities on a zero-to four-star scale, considers various financial statistics as well as transparency and accountability metrics as a way to give donors a better picture of how a particular charity performs over time and how accountable and transparent each organization is about how its funds are spent.
 
“We are honored to receive this prestigious rating from Charity Navigator,” said Roger Germann, President & CEO of The Florida Aquarium. “As a leading nonprofit aquarium in the country, we are committed to being excellent stewards of our resources in support of conservation and education while remaining accountable to those who support us.”
 
For more detailed information, please see charitynavigator.org. Donations may be made to The Florida Aquarium at flaquarium.org/donate.

 

Top: Rachel Serafin, The Florida Aquarium coral biologist, presents the Aquarium's coral reproduction success at the World Aquaculture Society Conference. Left: Staghorn coral from the August 2017 spawning. Right: Elkhorn coral from the August 2017 spawning. Credit all: The Florida Aquarium.
 
Rachel Serafin, a coral biologist at The Florida Aquarium, was a featured speaker at the World Aquaculture Society Conference held in Las Vegas from Feb. 19-22, 2018. The World Aquaculture Society is an organization recognized for its professional credibility in aquaculture science, technology and education.
 
Serafin spoke about The Florida Aquarium’s unprecedented success in coral reproduction. This year has been the Aquarium’s most successful year to date in coral reproduction. The Aquarium currently has 120 coral juveniles that have survived and flourished from last August’s spawning event (when corals release eggs and sperm in the water at the same time to reproduce).
 
“Speaking at this conference, on a global stage, is a necessary step forward for coral restoration. Corals are not your typical cute, cuddly animal. They are often forgotten, but they are vital to the health of our oceans. Speaking at such a prestigious conference allows us to bring attention to this critical issue before it is too late and all our reefs are beyond repair,” said Serafin.
 
Corals are the building blocks of marine habitats and oxygen-giving marine organisms, and though they cover only about one percent of the ocean floor, they have a huge effect on the health of the rest of the ocean and the planet. That is why The Florida Aquarium is working hard to protect and restore our oceans and raise awareness about the many threats coral reefs face today, such as increasing water temperature, pollution and overfishing.
 
“Aquaculture is the rearing of aquatic animals such red drum or snook, and coral is no different,” said Serafin. “While some rear fish to replenish wild populations, we rear corals to help replenish those wild populations that are in dire need of our help.”
 
There are different types of coral aquaculture practices that The Florida Aquarium uses to aid in coral restoration, but genetic creation through sexual reproduction was the focus of Serafin’s presentation.
 
The Florida Aquarium is a leading partner during the annual staghorn coral spawn in the Florida Keys. The annual coral spawn gives corals their only chance to sexually reproduce on their own and build future coral reefs, and this process is vital for scientists to witness for coral research and conservation.
 
Every year, The Florida Aquarium and other partners dive 30 feet below the ocean’s surface in Tavernier Key, expertly collecting the spawn from the Coral Restoration Foundation’s coral nursery, and deliver them to teams aboard research boats. Those teams immediately begin the fertilization process using the bundles of eggs and sperm (gametes) and rush them to on-shore labs to maximize the development of embryos and ultimately free-swimming larvae. Some of the larvae were released to the wild, while others were brought back to grow at The Florida Aquarium’s Center for Conservation in Apollo Beach, FL and at other partner institutions.
 
“This year compared to previous years, we have seen an incredible increase in our success rates. We now have 120 coral juveniles in our land-based coral nursery, and they are all doing spectacularly,” said Serafin. “Our goal with these juveniles is to create genetic diversity among Florida coral reefs and their ability to survive changing conditions. We are giving these corals their best chance to survive and flourish.”
 
 

What: The Florida Aquarium will release eight Kemp’s ridley sea turtles after three months of rehabilitation. The turtles suffered through a cold-stunning event in the Northeast that began in early November 2017.
 
These turtles, along with 38 other cold-stunned turtles, were transferred to Florida from the New England Aquarium in Massachusetts on Dec. 8 as part of a multi-institutional effort including Clearwater Marine Aquarium, Mote Marine Laboratory and Sea World Orlando, to rehabilitate and release the turtles back to the ocean.
 
In addition, one of the eight turtles being released is the Kemp’s ridley turtle named Quincy that appeared on The Florida Aquarium’s social media back in November.
 
Quincy is from the previous cold-stun season, and he is named after Quincy, MA, the site of the sea turtle hospital where he first received care. He was transferred to The Florida Aquarium in December of 2016, along with nine other cold-stunned turtles.
 
Quincy and the other turtles were all treated for pneumonia, and most of them were released last Summer. Quincy, however, developed a front flipper injury and required additional specialized treatment. He received several months of low-intensity laser therapy and physical therapy to help improve mobility with his flipper, and became a bit of a local celebrity when a video of one of his laser treatment sessions was posted to The Florida Aquarium’s Instagram for Giving Tuesday. Quincy is a bit older and larger than the turtles from this season, but is swimming just as strongly, and is now ready for release.
 
The term “cold stunning” refers to the hypothermic reaction that occurs when sea turtles are exposed to prolonged cold-water temperatures. Sea turtles cannot regulate their own body temperatures and as a result of an abrupt temperature change, they can quickly become hypothermic, unable to move and can wash ashore. Initial symptoms include a decreased heart rate, decreased circulation, and lethargy, followed by shock, pneumonia and possibly death.

When: 11:15 a.m., Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018. *Please arrive at least 15 minutes before the release.
 
Where: Canaveral National Seashore Visitor Center, 7611 S Atlantic Ave, New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169(Volusia County). Go through the ticket booth, turn right and continue to drive for about 2 miles where you will see the Visitor’s Center to your right. The Aquarium's Communications team will meet you here for logistics and escort. The release location is just across the street from the Visitor’s Center.

Who: The Florida Aquarium animal care team
 
About The Florida Aquarium’s Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation
The Florida Aquarium’s Center for Conservation works to maintain healthy sea turtle populations with an emphasis on critical care and reintroduction back into natural habitats. One of only a few rehabilitation facilities authorized by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to treat endangered sea turtles, The Florida Aquarium has rehabilitated and released more than 150 turtles in the last decade (2007-2017). 

A member of the Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network (STSSN) for the Southeast Coast and the Gulf of Mexico, The Florida Aquarium also invests in public outreach, education and research.

 

Left: A species of branching stony coral colonies releasing egg bundles into the water in Horniman's lab. Credit: Horniman Museum & Gardens. Right: Keri O'Neil at The Florida Aquarium's Center for Conservation with coral that has grown in the lab from wild spawning. Credit: the Florida Aquarium.
 
The Florida Aquarium, based in Tampa, Florida, and the Horniman Museum and Gardens, based in London, have joined forces to save coral reefs by spawning (reproducing) corals in a lab – a major technique to aid coral restoration that has only been accomplished at the Horniman.
 
Corals in the wild reproduce by releasing their eggs and sperm into the water at the same time, which is an event that is increasingly more uncertain given the changing climate. This wild spawning event only happens once per year, which has meant opportunities for research have been limited – until now.
 
From Dec. 11 - 17, Keri O’Neil, The Florida Aquarium’s Coral Nursery Manager, will be visiting the Horniman to learn their techniques of growing corals in a lab setting and brainstorm ideas of how to transport future coral fragments to Florida for restoration purposes.
 
The Horniman Aquarium started Project Coral and in 2013 became the first organization globally to predictably induce coral spawning in a fully closed aquarium lab setting.  Now The Florida Aquarium is providing even more expertise to enhance this project with plans to plant the lab-grown coral fragments to coral reefs along the Florida Reef Tract.
 
The new partnership with The Florida Aquarium takes the research protocols developed in the Horniman’s lab in Forest Hill, south London, and applies them in The Florida Aquarium’s state-of-the-art coral conservation nursery in Apollo Beach, Florida.
 
“Project Coral is ‘game-changing,’ allowing us to spawn corals on site, create multiple spawning events across the year and drastically speed up restoration work to ensure the survival of Florida’s reef,” said Scott Graves, Director of The Florida Aquarium’s Center for Conservation.
 
Project Coral is an innovative coral reproductive research project led by the Horniman Aquarium with international partners, working to predictably spawn corals in a lab setting in order to investigate, counter and repair the impact of climate change on coral reef health and reproduction. Since 2012, researchers at the Horniman Museum and Gardens Aquarium have been researching broadcast coral reproduction, developing protocols that replicate natural reef conditions – and the triggers for mass spawning events – in the lab, to predict and induce land-based spawning.
 
Corals bred at The Florida Aquarium using Project Coral techniques – all from species listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act – will be transplanted into the ocean to restore the Florida Reef off the state’s south eastern coast.
 
Coral reefs are one of the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world and support about 25 percent of all marine life. In addition, they are important to the Florida economy as fisheries and a tourist attraction.
 
The reef has suffered dramatically from bleaching events that occur when ocean temperatures rise, as well as pollution and other human-related environmental causes. Some scientists believe staghorn coral can no longer successfully sexually reproduce in the wild at all with these environmental challenges emerging. Thus, scientific groups like the ones formed by the Horniman and The Florida Aquarium are changing the game by spawning corals in a lab setting, allowing the corals to spawn more than just once a year. The increase in spawning occurrences will give the team a better chance to make a substantial impact on the restoration of corals.
 
“Project Coral has made huge strides in creating the protocols to induce coral spawning in lab conditions, and the Horniman’s research will continue to refine the techniques and understand the effects of climate change on coral reproduction. But we need partners to be able to put our research into practice in the field. This partnership with The Florida Aquarium is Project Coral’s first opportunity to make a ‘real world’ change, and we look forward to seeing the positive effects our work together will have on Florida’s reefs” said Jamie Craggs, Aquarium Curator at the Horniman Museum and Gardens.
 
About The Horniman Museum and Gardens
The Horniman Museum and Gardens opened in 1901 as a gift to the people in perpetuity from tea trader and philanthropist Frederick John Horniman, to ‘bring the world to Forest Hill’. Today the Horniman has a collection of 350,000 objects, specimens and artefacts from around the world. Its galleries include natural history, anthropology, music and an acclaimed aquarium. Indoor exhibits link to the award-winning display gardens – from food and dye gardens to an interactive sound garden – set among 16 acres of beautiful, green space offering spectacular views across London. horniman.ac.uk
 
About The Florida Aquarium
The Florida Aquarium is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization whose mission is to entertain, educate and inspire stewardship about our natural environment. The Florida Aquarium is accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA).

The Florida Aquarium is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization whose mission is to entertain, educate and inspire stewardship about our natural environment. The Florida Aquarium is accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA).

 

Tristin Ware, Katie Fortescue, Sabrina DiNella and Debbi Stone of The Florida Aquarium accept their Gulf Guardian Award at an awards ceremony held at the Grand Hotel Marriott Resort in Point Clear, Alabama on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017. Credit: The Florida Aquarium.
 
On Thursday, November 30, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Gulf of Mexico Program recognized The Florida Aquarium with a first place 2017 Gulf Guardian Award in the Youth Environmental Education category. The award was presented at a ceremony held at the Grand Hotel Marriott Resort in Point Clear, Alabama.
 
“Whether for individual recreational use or as an economic engine supporting a wide variety of jobs and industry, the Gulf of Mexico is a vibrant yet vulnerable ecosystem,” said Ben Scaggs, Gulf of Mexico Program Director. “Protecting this national resource requires innovative approaches and proactive measures. The Gulf Guardian award winners are paving the way for ‘out of the box’ thinking and replicable practices.” 
 
The Gulf of Mexico Program recognizes and honors those who are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive. First, second and third place awards are given in seven categories: individual, business/industry, youth environmental education, civic/nonprofit organizations, cultural diversity/environmental justice, partnership and bi-national efforts.
 
“I am proud of The Florida Aquarium’s education team for being awarded the 2017 Gulf Guardian Award in the Youth Environmental Education category. It is a true testament of how this team continues to reach the community’s youth and teach them in unique and engaging ways, encouraging them to get involved to keep our waters healthy for generations to come,” said Roger Germann, president and CEO of The Florida Aquarium.
 
The Florida Aquarium takes part in educational programming for children and some programing that is geared specifically for local Title 1 schools, including the Watershed Investigations (WI) program.
 
WI enables underserved students to experience their watershed while conducting scientific investigations. Components include exploring issues, learning and practicing field techniques, collecting data, and analyzing results with teachers and peers. The classroom introduction and classroom synthesis provide important bookends to field experiences, and field visits reinforce students’ data collection skills while empowering them to become skilled in collecting data and analyzing results. The final project encourages students to relate data and observations to the larger watershed, climate change issues and their own lives.
 
“Watershed Investigations serves Title 1 schools to ensure that we are engaging underserved youth who might otherwise not experience hands-on field investigations that spark wonder and curiosity about our natural world. The Florida Aquarium is committed to reaching diverse audiences in our community, and this is one of the programs that brings science to life for future problem-solvers who will help us protect and restore our blue planet, all while having fun,” said Debbi Stone, vice president of education at The Florida Aquarium.
 
During the first two years of WI, the program impacted at least 1,747 students and 80 teachers (some of whom participated in both years). In the current year, The Florida Aquarium is tracking 42 teachers and 893 students, which will result in about 2,640 students cumulatively reached by the conclusion of this year.
 
Through WI, students build critical thinking skills by: demonstrating understanding of watershed concepts, identifying their local and regional watershed, observing how ecosystems change seasonally, collecting water quality data, identifying flora and fauna in the field, assessing scientifically credible information about climate, making projections about future changes, understanding how humans impact climate, and identifying personal actions to reduce one’s environmental impact.

The Florida Aquarium is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization whose mission is to entertain, educate and inspire stewardship about our natural environment. The Florida Aquarium is accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA).
Copyright © 2017. The Florida Aquarium. All rights reserved.

The Florida Aquarium to assist in recovery effort of Florida’s coral reef following hurricane damage

 
Top: A team during one of the first assessment trips to assess the damage of Florida's coral reefs after hurricane damage. From left to right: Laurie MacLaughlin (NOAA Florida Keys Sanctuary); Jessica Levy (Coral Restoration Foundation); Mark Riss; Deb Riss; Dave Grenda (The Florida Aquarium volunteers); Brenda Altmeier (NOAA Florida Keys Sanctuary); and Dave Rintoul (The Florida Aquarium Dive Safety Officer) Left: The Florida Aquarium's Dave Safety Officer, Dave Rintoul, attaches coral fragments to an existing coral tree in the Coral Restoration Foundation's nursery. These activities were conducted under permit FKNMS-2015-133-A1. Right: Coral Restoration Foundation staff member Jessica Levy surveying health of corals at Sombrero Key.
 
What: After assessing the damage caused by Hurricane Irma on Florida’s coral reefs, The Florida Aquarium is helping the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other organizations repair the damage and help the reef recover. The Aquarium will be providing triage support including repositioning overturned, centuries old boulder corals; reattaching broken and fragmented pieces of coral; and removing debris.

When: The team will be traveling to the Florida Keys from Nov. 12-18,

Where: The Florida Aquarium, 701 Channelside Drive, Tampa, Florida.

For more information on the assessment and recovery initiative:

After assessing the damage caused by Hurricane Irma on Florida’s coral reefs, The Florida Aquarium is helping the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other organizations repair the damage and help the reef recover. The Aquarium will be by providing triage support including repositioning overturned, centuries old boulder corals; reattaching broken and fragmented pieces of coral; and removing debris.

Coral reefs cover two percent of the ocean floor but are home to 25 percent of marine life in the ocean. They provide critical habitat for other species such as sea turtles, dolphins and sharks, as well as help protect coastlines from storms.

“Healthy coral reefs are adapted to withstand hurricanes. In fact, they protect shorelines by dissipating wave energy, but the reef ecosystem in the Florida Keys has been heavily compromised and is found in small patches compared to what once existed. So when a huge hurricane like Irma hits, damage to corals can be devastating. They now need our help to recover. A healthy, living and thriving reef means a healthy, living and thriving ocean,” said Margo McKnight Senior VP of Conservation, Research and Husbandry at The Florida Aquarium.

Last month, assessments of the Florida coral reef tract following hurricane Irma showed significant impact on natural coral reefs and manmade ocean-based coral nurseries throughout the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas, as well as the broader Caribbean.

Large hurricanes can cause extensive damage on land, as well as under the sea, especially for corals that cannot leave their home to flee for safety.

Initial assessments of more than 50 sites revealed extensive shifting of sand and heavy sediment accumulation on the corals and sponges, which can smother and prevent them from getting enough sunlight, as well as some structural damage to individual corals and the reef itself. A full report is expected later this fall.

To help assist in the recovery of corals on the continental United States’ only barrier coral reef, The Florida Aquarium is helping NOAA, federal and state governmental agencies, academic institutions and other nonprofit organizations perform emergency recovery/restoration and assist with the stabilization and recovery of corals that sustained damage following the hurricane.

“During the assessment trips, it was very eye-opening to see these hundred-year-old corals snapped in two, with broken pieces sprawled all throughout the ocean floor. The assessment process identified damaged areas of the coral reef tract that could benefit from triage and restoration, so this next trip is to visit some of those sites and help stabilize them,” said Keri O’Neil, Coral Nursery Manager at The Florida Aquarium.

The Florida reef tract, much of which lies within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and Biscayne Bay National Park, contains seven coral species designated as threatened.

The Florida Aquarium staff will leave to travel to the Keys to help repair certain coral sites on Sunday, Nov. 12. Dive and repair days are Nov. 13 – 17, and the team will return home on Nov. 18. The Florida Aquarium will send updates with photos and videos during the assessment days, as possible.

This massive initiative involves several branches of NOAA, National Park Service, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Nova Southeastern University, Coral Restoration Foundation, The Nature Conservancy-Florida and The Florida Aquarium, with funding provided through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and administered through the Coral Restoration Foundation.

The Florida Aquarium is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization whose mission is to entertain, educate and inspire stewardship about our natural environment. The Florida Aquarium is accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA).
Copyright © 2017. The Florida Aquarium. All rights reserved.