Displaying items by tag: President Trump

Talkin' Pets News

February 3, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Maria Ryan

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Hour 1 Jerry Grymek - Hotel Penn NYC - Doggie Concierge

Hour 2 - Ada Nieves - Pet fashions - The 15th Annual Pet Fashion Show in NYC

Talkin' Pets News

November 18, 2017

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Celebrate the National Dog Show and Help raise Funds for Hurricane Relief, Emmy Award Host & Executive Producer of "Watch What Happens Live," Andy Cohen joins Jon and Talkin' Pets 11/18/17 at 520pm EST to encourage dog owners to join Purina's #DogThanking

Scott Graves, Director of The Florida Aquarium's Center for Conservation, will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 11/18/17 at 630pm EST to discuss efforts to recover Florida's coral reef following hurricane damage

Nashville's Paul Bogart will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 11/18/17 at 730pm EST to discuss and give away his latest music CD, Leather, and his competitive life in "Heeling"

 

(Washington, D.C., June 1, 2017) American Bird Conservancy (ABC) condemns President Donald J. Trump’s decision, announced today, to pull the United States out of the Paris Agreement on climate change. The reversal increases the dangers that a changing climate creates for migratory birds like Red Knot and many other species, including humans.

“This is another indication of a backward-looking energy policy that would plunder America’s remaining wildlife sanctuaries in the Arctic, offshore, and in the grasslands and forests,” said Steve Holmer, ABC’s Vice President of Policy. “We can develop a smart energy policy that responds to the climate challenge while still protecting birds and other wildlife and conserving their habitats.”

ABC remains strongly committed to combating the threats, including climate change and habitat loss, which face birds throughout the Americas. Together with partners, we have planted more than 5 million trees and protected vital habitat in North, Central, and South America.

Red Knots are one of many species affected by a changing climate. Photo by Mike Parr

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American Bird Conservancy  is dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation.

 

(Washington, D.C., April 28, 2017) President Donald Trump signed an Executive Order today directing the U.S. Department of the Interior to expand oil and gas development leasing to new areas along the Atlantic and Arctic coasts and review National Marine Sanctuaries and Marine National Monuments designated during the past 10 years. Numerous environmental groups, including American Bird Conservancy (ABC), condemned the measure, saying it’s likely to harm wildlife as well as tourism and fisheries, and 27 U.S. Senators have expressed their opposition to offshore drilling.

“Offshore drilling and resulting oil spills and pollution would threaten numerous shorebirds on the Atlantic coast  as well as in the Arctic,” said Steve Holmer, ABC’s Vice President of Policy. “Endangered species and other wildlife are being put at needless risk by this backward-looking energy policy.”

Oil and other petrochemicals are toxic to birds, and because oil floats on the surface of water, seabirds are particularly vulnerable to this form of pollution. Birds with severely oiled plumage lose their ability to keep warm, often dying of hypothermia before they are fatally poisoned.

Species at risk along the Atlantic Coast include Brown Pelican, Red-throated Loon, Roseate Tern, and the Black-capped Petrel. The order also calls for reconsideration of the Well Control Rule put in place after the Deepwater Horizon disaster to reduce the risk of oils spills.

Arctic birds could be harmed by offshore drilling as well. The recovery of Spectacled and Steller’s Eider, endangered species whose populations have stabilized since being listed under the Endangered Species Act, could be threatened. Other species of conservation concern found along Arctic coasts include the Yellow-billed Loon, Spectacled Eider, Ivory Gull, and Ross’s Gull.

The administration is also facing strong opposition in the Senate. Twenty-seven Senators have sent a letter to Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke calling on the administration to protect coastlines from offshore drilling.

Keeping protections from offshore drilling in place “is essential to protect key industries for our states, such as fishing and tourism, our environment and our climate,” the senators wrote. “Allowing drilling anywhere on the East or West Coasts would threaten key economic drivers for these states such as fishing and tourism with the risk of an oil spill. Offshore oil spills don’t respect state boundaries and a spill off the coast of one state could easily affect another.” A copy of the letter to Secretary Zinke can be found here.

(Photo: Red-throated Loon is one of many species at risk from offshore oil and gas drilling. Photo by Dan Behm)

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American Bird Conservancy is dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation.

 

Executive Order Puts Natural Resources and Local Economies at Risk

 

(Washington, D.C., April 26, 2017) President Trump signed an Executive Order today calling for the Interior Department to review National Monument designations exceeding 100,000 acres since 1996, with an eye toward reducing or eliminating areas that were protected for their historic, cultural, and environmental importance.

“This Executive Order has the potential to undermine one of the nation’s most important conservation tools—one that has benefited endangered birds such as the Northern Spotted Owl and provided habitat essential for their recovery,” said Steve Holmer, Vice President of Policy for American Bird Conservancy. “It’s a troubling reversal of the conservation ethic established by President Teddy Roosevelt in 1906, when he signed the Antiquities Act to safeguard and preserve federal lands and cultural and historical sites for all Americans to enjoy.”

Across the United States, National Monuments make a crucial difference for wildlife. For instance, the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, the only monument created specifically to conserve biodiversity, provides habitat for the threatened Northern Spotted Owl. The monument also creates an important habitat linkage for the species by protecting a ridge that connects the Coast Range with the Cascade Range. The Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, established by President George W. Bush in 2006, protects the land and waters of the Northwest Hawaiian Islands and is home to 99 percent of the world's breeding population of Laysan Albatross, as well as critically endangered Laysan Duck, Nihoa Finch, and Nihoa Millerbird.

“This review process is a step in the wrong direction,” Holmer said. “It threatens endangered birds and diminishes the natural heritage of future generations of Americans."

The Executive Order also threatens to undermine a sustainable economic engine. Outdoor recreation alone generated $887 billion and supported 7.6 million jobs last year. In 2016, national parks saw a record 331 million visits, contributing almost $35 billion to the U.S. economy. Regions surrounding national monuments have seen continued growth or improvement in employment and personal income, and rural counties in the West with more federal lands have healthier economies, on average, than similar communities with fewer protected lands.

(Photo: National Monuments protect crucial habitat for threatened birds, including Northern Spotted Owl, and many other species. Photo by All Canada Photos.)

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American Bird Conservancy is dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation.

President Trump’s proposed 2018 federal budget would gut major programs and protections for birds and America’s public lands, putting decades of conservation achievements at risk. With so much on the line, it’s imperative that we send Congress a loud, unmistakable message that such extreme cuts will not stand.

Drastic reductions in the proposed federal budget would scale down on-the-ground conservation at a time when one-third of migratory bird species, including the Kentucky Warbler (shown), are already in decline. Birds are sensitive indicators of environmental health as a whole, and the loss of migratory birds signals a potential crisis that Congress must act now to reverse.

But that’s not all: Three federal agencies critical to bird conservation—the Department of Interior, the Department of Agriculture, and the Environmental Protection Agency—are facing drastic budget cuts that will significantly reduce federal bird protections.

If we want migratory birds to bounce back, it’s critical that Congress prioritize and fund the following:

  • The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act, critical to the restoration of habitat for migratory birds throughout the Western Hemisphere.
  • Migratory Bird Joint Ventures, North American regional partnerships that work across political boundaries and levels of government to achieve conservation success for birds and their habitats.
  • Endangered Species Act, in order to fully recover endangered and threatened bird species.
  • Farm Bill conservation programs, like Conservation Reserve Program, which preserve habitat for birds by providing conservation incentives to private landowners.
  • EPA’s Pesticides Program, critical to protecting birds from deadly pesticides like neonicotinoids used in agriculture.

Please act now! Tell your Senators and Representative: Make protecting migratory birds and the conservation programs they depend on a priority. Thank you.