Displaying items by tag: Medical

 

RALEIGH, NC (3/14/18) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (AKC CHF) and the V Foundation for Cancer Research announce a collaboration to fund cancer research for dogs that may also benefit people.

In an area of research known as “Comparative Oncology”, the two national organizations find they speak the same language. Comparative Oncology is the discipline that integrates naturally occurring cancers in dogs into broader studies of cancer biology and therapy. Since dogs and people get many of the same cancers, the AKC CHF and the V Foundation have teamed up to fund research in this field to benefit both species.

One of the cancers that occurs in both dogs and people is bladder cancer. Bladder cancer affects approximately 40,000 dogs and 79,000 people a year. The first project the AKC CHF and the V Foundation is jointly funding will test a new, targeted immunotherapy against a specific gene mutation that occurs in bladder cancer. Nicola Mason, BVetMed, PhD, a veterinary researcher at the University of Pennsylvania will lead the research team in this clinical trial entitled, “Immune Targeting of the V600E B-Raf Neoantigen in Canine Urothelial Carcinoma”.

“The V Foundation is excited about this partnership with the AKC CHF. Our funding of research in Comparative Oncology represents our belief that this work benefits humans and dogs alike. We are honored to co-fund this grant in memory of David Kane,” said Susan Braun, CEO of the V Foundation.

According to Dr. Diane Brown, CEO of the AKC CHF, “As veterinarians, we are trained to understand disease processes across species and have a clear understanding of the field of Comparative Oncology and comparative medicine. What is important now is to see human medicine working closely with veterinary medicine to benefit all species, and in this case, dogs and humans. We are thrilled to work with the V Foundation to lead in this area of research for a new cancer vaccine. Together we are stronger, and joining forces for bladder cancer research just makes sense.”

# # #

About the AKC Canine Health Foundation

Since 1995, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation has awarded more than $40 million in research grants for the health of dogs, and works to prevent, treat and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

About the V Foundation for Cancer Research
The V Foundation for Cancer Research was founded in 1993 by ESPN and the late Jim Valvano, legendary North Carolina State University basketball coach and ESPN commentator. Since 1993, the Foundation has funded more than $200 million in cancer research grants nationwide. The V Foundation awards 100% of direct donations to cancer research and programs. The V Foundation’s endowment covers administrative expenses. The Foundation awards peer-reviewed grants through a competitive awards process strictly supervised by a Scientific Advisory Committee. For more information on the V Foundation or to make a donation, please visit www.jimmyv.org.

 

AMERICA’S TOP FELINE BEHAVIOR EXPERT

AND BESTSELLING AUTHOR

ANSWERS THE 150 MOST BAFFLING QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR CAT

 

CATWISE: America’s Favorite Cat Expert Answers Your Cat Behavior Questions

 

Praise for CATWISE:

“Cats are like pieces of art that grace your home and throw up on your laptop, but how we love them, and nobody knows the ways of the mysterious feline any better than Pam Johnson-Bennett. If you are holding this book, be prepared to learn more about cats then you ever could have imagined.”

Cat owner Joseph S. Bonsall,

Member of the American music group

The Oak Ridge Boys

“…to strengthen our bond with our precious feline friends, Pam’s advice is simply the best. As a proud pet parent of three cats, our home is full of purrs, meows, and love thanks to Pam’s wisdom and training methods.”

Robin Ganzert, PhD, president and CEO,

American Humane Society

 

 

 

 

Why do cats always sit on your newspaper or your child’s homework? Why do cats lick your hair? Isn’t it cruel to keep a cat indoors? These are just a few of the puzzles Pam Johnson-Bennett solves in CATWISE: America’s Favorite Cat Expert Answers Your Cat Behavior Questions (A Penguin Paperback Original; On sale: October 18; $18.00; 9780143129561) the definitive guide to every question you’ve had about your cat―all one-hundred and fifty of them.

In CATWISE Johnson-Bennett explains with insight and experience why cats do what they do, and where they do it, and how we can get them to stop. CATWISE will help you to solve your cat’s behavioral problem, prevent problems from the beginning in the first place, or simply improve the relationship you already have with your cat. Using her trademark approach, “think like a cat,” Pam shows you how to understand all those seemingly inexplicable habits and sudden shifts of mood.

Here is a sample of some topics covered in CATWISE:

  • What should we do the first night we bring our new cat home?
  • Can I train a cat?
  • How do I give my cat a pill?
  • How do I train a cat to use its litter box?
  • What if my cat stops using the litter box?
  • Why does my cat come up only to my friends who are allergic to cats?
  • How do I prepare a cat for the arrival of a new baby?
  • What’s the best way to introduce dogs and cats?

Pam’s thirty years of observing and advising all inform this idea-filled volume that spans litter boxes to cat trees, declawing to sock-chewing. Organized thematically by topic and question, this authoritative, comprehensive resource offers proven methods to solve your cat’s behavior problems (or head them off before they start) so that you can focus on creating a happy and safe home for all its inhabitants.

About the Author:

Pam Johnson-Bennett is one of the most popular and sought-after cat behavior experts in the world. She is the author of seven award-winning books on cat behavior, including Think Like a Cat, Hiss and Tell, Starting from Scratch, and Cat vs. Cat. She has a private cat-consulting practice in Nashville, appears on Animal Planet UK and Canada, and lectures on cat behavior at veterinary and animal welfare conferences around the world. She’s been featured on CNN, Fox News Channel, CBS, ABC, NBC, Fox & Friends, Animal Planet Radio, and many more shows. Print profiles includeWall Street Journal, The New York Times, Real Simple, Better Homes & Gardens, Womans World, Newsweek, Prevention, USA Today, Family Circle, Complete Woman, Newsday, Chicago Tribune, USA Weekend, Washington Post, andParade. She was VP of the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants and founded the IAABC Cat Division. Pam served on the American Humane Association's Advisory Board on Animal Behavior and Training. She lives in Nashville, TN. To learn more visit http://www.catbehaviorassociates.com/

CATWISE: America’s Favorite Cat Expert Answers Your Cat Behavior Questions

by Pam Johnson-Bennett

A Penguin Paperback Original ▪ $18.00 ▪ On-sale date: October 18, 2016 ▪ ISBN:9780143129561

Also available as an e-book

www.penguin.com

Penguin Random House (http://global.penguinrandomhouse.com/) is the world’s most global trade book publisher. It was formed on July 1, 2013, upon the completion of an agreement between Bertelsmann and Pearson to merge their respective trade publishing companies, Random House and Penguin, with the parent companies owning 53% and 47%, respectively.  Penguin Random House comprises the adult and children’s fiction and nonfiction print and digital trade book publishing businesses of Penguin and Random House in the U.S., U.K., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India and South Africa, and Penguin’s trade publishing activity in Asia and Brazil; DK worldwide; and Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial’s Spanish-language companies in Spain, Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay, Colombia, and Chile. Penguin Random House employs more than 10,000 people globally across almost 250 editorially and creatively independent imprints and publishing houses that collectively publish more than 15,000 new titles annually. Its publishing lists include more than 70 Nobel Prize laureates and hundreds of the world’s most widely read authors.

 
 
 
 

AUGUST 2016

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 

Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome: What Patients Are Learning

Throughout the year, we publish articles on different topics to help educate senior pet owners so they have a better understanding of what is going on with their best friend.  Our current focus around our articles is to help inform and educate owners on the details, facts and symptoms around Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome, and how they can approach the issue with their veterinarian.

As part of this "CDS 101" education, we at Neutricks want to make sure you as that veterinarian know what the owners are seeing so you can be prepared for any questions or concerns they may have.

Review Neutricks Blog for CDS Articles

New Peer Reviewed Article on CDS and Apoaequorin

We are pleased to share with you a recently published peer reviewed veterinary journal article on cognitive dysfunction syndrome and apoaequorin, the active ingredient in Neutricks, titled "A novel mechanism for cognitive engagement in aged dogs with the use of a calcium-buffering protein".

Download & Read Article | See All Research on the Vet Portal

 

Neutricks Vet Portal

The portal is an easy way to see who carries Neutricks, how to carry Neutricks at your practice, a complete list of our distributors, marketing materials for your practice or store, research materials, and more.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

Share Neutricks with fellow vet colleagues
Thanks for reading!

Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA

Degenerative myelopathy is a degenerative disease of the spinal cord that begins in older adulthood and progresses slowly until dogs are no longer able to walk unassisted. The cause of the disease is associated with a mutation in the SOD1 gene. It is not known exactly how the mutation of this gene leads to degeneration of the spinal cord in dogs, but the disease does interfere with the brain’s communication to the limbs, resulting in difficulty walking.

Dr. Beth Boudreau, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, further explained the disease. “In degenerative myelopathy, the pathways that carry neural information in the spinal cord lose their insulatory coating and begin to fragment, and eventually the neurons that produce those signals also begin to die,” she said. “This results in a loss of motor control that begins in the hind limbs, but can spread to involve the front limbs as well as the pathways that control breathing, urination, and defecation. Currently, these changes are irreversible. Advanced cases may cause difficulty breathing as well. The disease is considered to be eventually fatal.”

The signs of degenerative myelopathy often begin around eight to nine years of age in larger breeds, and small breeds may have a later onset of signs around eleven years of age. Initially, mild stumbling, weakness, or incoordination of the hind limbs may be apparent. Although both hind limbs are usually affected, one is often weaker than the other. The signs slowly progress over a period of weeks to months and the disease does not cause the dog any apparent pain.

Testing for the associated mutation is an important part of the diagnosis of degenerative myelopathy. However, some dogs that have this mutation may never develop the disease, so a positive result of the genetic test alone cannot be relied upon for diagnosis. Additionally, other health conditions may share similar signs of degenerative myelopathy.

“Compared to other common causes of chronic spinal cord injury in older dogs, degenerative myelopathy often has a slower onset and progression, and it is not painful,” Boudreau said. “However, other spinal cord diseases, such as chronic intervertebral disc herniation, and even some tumors, may appear clinically similar. A complete evaluation with diagnostics and performed by a neurologist is recommended to rule out diseases that can mimic degenerative myelopathy.”

Currently, there is no known effective medical or surgical treatment for degenerative myelopathy. However, physical rehabilitation therapy at veterinary clinics has been shown to result in longer survival times for dogs affected by the disease.

“Unfortunately, this disease progresses, with most dogs becoming unable to walk within six to nine months after the first signs appear,” Boudreau said. “Because this condition does not appear to be painful, many dogs can continue to have a good quality of life even after they become unable to walk, if provided good supportive care. Dogs that cannot walk will need an assistance device, such as a cart or harness, to help them move about.”

Additionally, severely affected dogs may need assistance to void their bladders. Regular passive exercise of the limbs, turning, and cleaning are needed to prevent limb contractures and bedsores. Although many dogs tolerate the necessary nursing care very well, it is important for owners of dogs with degenerative myelopathy to regularly communicate with their veterinarian and assess their pet’s quality of life.

### 
Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

More news about Texas A&M University 
Follow us on Twitter 

ABOUT THE BOOK

Tired of your dog slobbering on your face? Trying to minimize mouthing? What supplies do you need before you bring home a new puppy? What do you do during a thunderstorm or with an elderly animal? For 15 years, Adopt-a-Pet.com has brought companions into the lives of thousands and now, for the first time ever, the editors at Adopt-a-Pet.com present The Total Dog Manual, a comprehensive guide to understanding your furry friend.

From understanding a dog’s anatomy and those deep-down doggie instincts to training methods and grooming tips, all the information you need to understand your dog is now at your fingertips. Broken up into three sections–behavior, training and care–and easily organized from puppy-hood to old age, you will learn tips on curbing bad habits, teaching basic commands, vacationing with your dog, communicating effectively and much, much more. The Total Dog Manual’s easy to follow format and step-by-step training methods makes this your foolproof guide to dog care.

Dr. Pia Salk specializes in social justice and the human-animal bond.

In both her clinical work and in her writing, Pia addresses topics ranging from the loss of a personal companion animal to the climate of animal welfare as it relates to social justice on a broader scale.

Her writing is included in the recently published, Pet Loss and Human Emotion. And her extensive involvement in the animal rescue effort following hurricane Katrina has been featured on such shows as Animal Planet’s Hurricane Heroes and 20/20 to name a few. Pia is the spokesperson for www.Adopt-A-Pet.com , North America’s largest non-profit pet adoption website.  This site gives adoptable animals national exposure and a chance at being adopted into loving homes.  

Pia hosts The Save-a-Pet show and is a contributing writer on the Adopt-a-Pet.com website. She covers such topics as why adopting not only saves lives, but makes for good parenting and promotes pro-social behavior in today’s youth.

You may also recognize Pia as a frequent guest on The Martha Stewart Show, where she highlights the important role that animals play in our lives and how our societal treatment of animals conveys important messages to our youth. Pia is also a regular guest contributor to The Martha Stewart blog, "The Daily Wag"
 
Pia has developed programs that pair at-risk teens with animals who share similar histories of abuse and neglect.  According to one of her Psychologist colleagues, “She may be little in stature, but she is big on personality. The kids and animals she works with love her ability to roll around and get dirty, both physically and emotionally.  She has a knack for reading both animals and humans!”.
 
Dr. Salk brings her own rescued animals into her clinical work. And she often credits the animals as being “the real therapists.”  

Dr. José Arce, DVM

​District IV AVMA Board of Directors Representative 

AVMA Officers
Biographical Sketch

Dr. José V. Arce was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in animal science from Louisiana State University and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine. During his undergraduate years, Dr. Arce worked as a veterinary assistant in Burbank Veterinary Hospital in Baton Rouge and participated in student activities, serving as president of the Pre-Vet Club. After obtaining his bachelor degree, he worked as a research assistant at the Caribbean Primate Research Center. While in veterinary school, Dr. Arce was the class treasurer and a SCAVMA representative for four years and LSU’s SCAVMA treasurer during his sophomore year. He completed an internship in small animal medicine, surgery, and emergency treatment at Rowley Memorial Animal Hospital in Springfield, Mass.
 
In 1998, Dr. Arce moved back to Puerto Rico. Early in his career, he worked as a veterinarian at the Avian and Small Animal Hospital, San Juan Municipal Shelter, Dorado Veterinary Hospital. For seven years, he also worked at the Diaz Umpierre Veterinary Clinic. In 2003, he founded Miramar Animal Hospital, of which he is president and co-owner. His special interests include dermatology, ophthalmology, and ultrasonography.
 
As soon as he moved back to his beloved Puerto Rico, Dr. Arce became active in the Colegio de Medicos Veterinarios de Puerto Rico (PRVMA) and was named to the Ethics and Grievances Committee in 1988. In 1999, he was selected to represent the PRVMA to the AVMA Leadership Conference. In 2000, he was elected as the alternate delegate to the AVMA House of Delegates, a position he held until 2010 when he was elected to his current position as delegate. Dr. Arce has been a board member of the PRVMA since 2000. Since 2001, he has been an active member of the Legislation Commission, of which he has been secretary for the past four years and has lobbied actively for the passage of legislations dealing with veterinary medicine matters with local senators and representatives as well as with US congressmen on behalf of the AVMA. He has also been an active member of the PRVMA Convention Committee since 2009 and has helped achieve record number of participants in the last two annual conventions.
 
Dr. Arce still maintains strong ties to his alma mater. In 2009, he was selected to participate in the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Stakeholders Summit.
 
In 2011, Dr. Arce was chosen and took part in the AVMA House of Delegates Leadership Development Program. In 2012, he was selected and participated in the AVMA Summit on Governance.
 
Dr. Arce has also been very active in his community of Miramar in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He currently serves on the Board of the Miramar Residents Association, is the PTA President of Perpetuo Socorro Academy, is Assistant Scoutmaster of Miramar’s Boy Scouts of America Troop 29, and has been active for the past 12 years in the pro-statehood New Progressive Party and currently serves as Miramar’s Precinct Electoral Commissioner. He is also active in the sport of soccer, both as a player and team representative. Having served from 2010 to 2012 as Director of the National Masters (over 35) Soccer League of Puerto Rico, he still plays and is team president of the Club de Internacional de Futbol. He lives with his wife (and fellow veterinarian) Dr. Anik Puig and son Diego in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

TALKIN PETS NEWS
Saturday, Nov. 26, the 330th day of 2011.
There are 35 days left in the year.

"Turkey Coma Edition"

Today in History
1789, this was a day of thanksgiving set aside by President George Washington to observe the adoption of the Constitution of the United States.

1842, the founders of the University of Notre Dame arrived at the school's present-day site near South Bend, Ind.

1922, In Egypt, the entrance to child-king Tutankhamen's tomb is discovered by archeologist Howard Carter.

1983, A Brinks vault in London's Heathrow Airport is robbed by gunmen, who make off with 6,800 gold bars worth nearly 40-million dollars.

Celeb B-Days
Impressionist Rich Little is 73

Singer Tina Turner is 72.

Pop singer Natasha Bedingfield is 30

Charles M. Schulz Born 11/26/1922 . The Peanuts cartoonist died February 12th, 2000.

Crew

Jon Patch - Host

Adriana Odachowski DVM - East-West Animal Hospital / Co Host

Bob Page - Executive Producer

Zack Budin - Network Producer

Special Guest Hour 1 – Author:  Dave FitzSimmons – Curious Critters – (Book give aways during interview)

Special Guest Hour 2 – Ari Meltzer – Head of Business Development – Dog-e-Glow (Leash and collar give aways during interview)


--------------------------
You're an officer of the law and you're scared of a Jack Russell? Do you want that kind of person protecting you????

A Florida woman is upset after her Jack Russell terrier was shot and killed by a Citrus County Sheriff's deputy who said he felt threatened.

Nancy Blackwell is trying to put the past behind her, but fun and games with her Jack Russell, Rascal, are not the same without the third member of their family. Blackwell's other Jack Russell, Princess, was shot and killed by CCSO deputy Nick Hesse as the deputy served an arrest warrant on Blackwell's son.

Police spokesperson Gail Tierney said Princess began barking at Hesse, got out of Blackwell's house and ran at the deputy while showing her teeth and growling.

Tierney said the deputy moved back, shot and killed the dog. Hesse said he felt threatened by Princess.

Blackwell doesn't agree with the explanation she was given and had harsh words for the deputy: "You�re an officer of the law and you�re scared of a Jack Russell? Do you want that kind of person protecting you?"

The dog is now buried in Blackwell's backyard, along with her favorite blanket, a toy and her bowl. Blackwell said she won't get another dog.

Tierney said the incident is under review, but the deputy had the right to defend himself. New procedures could be put in place to keep a similar incident from happening again.

-----------------------

Wild Turkey ruins another family holiday... and no not the booze Wild Turkey this time... a real wild turkey...

A wild turkey apparently flew into an Eat'n Park restaurant on -- of all days -- Thanksgiving.

The 15-pound turkey was found among a pile of shattered glass on the carpet near some booth tables around 3 p.m.

Nobody was inside the restaurant at the time as it was closed for the holiday.

Penn Hills police Officer Bernard Sestili responded when the building's alarm went off. He said the turkey flew into the window and was not thrown. The turkey was probably was roosted in one of the trees in the near by wooded area, went for his morning flight and flew into the window.

A turkey fighting back, on Thanksgiving -- how ironic.

---------------------------
Man purchases venomous black mamba snake at an interstate exit in South Georgia. What could possibly go wrong?

Wildlife authorities are investigating after a 22-year-old man was bitten by a venomous black mamba while he was trying to purchase the snake at an interstate exit in south Georgia.

Keep in mind the Black mamba has a reputation as one of the most deadly snakes.

John K. Rosenbaum of Jacksonville Fl. was bitten during the sale this week along I-95 in Kingsland Ga.. Rosenbaum was taken to two hospitals � Southeast Georgia Health System's Camden hospital before being transported to Shands Jacksonville in Florida.

Shands officials say he has been discharged.

Georgia authorities say no one in the state has a wild animal license for black mambas, nor does Rosenbaum. Violators can get up to a year in jail and a $1,000 fine.

------------------------

Family decides to spare life of oyster they found because it had shapes on its shell arranged to look like a human face. They did not say if it also resembled a bearded clam...

Eva Carbonaro of Mass. said she and her family were at Scudder Lane town landing to search for Thanksgiving oysters when they came across the funny-faced oyster among some barnacles and seaweed on the beach.

Carbonaro said she has been keeping the oyster in a bowl of water in her refrigerator and her family has decided to make the creature, which they named Rockefeller, a special guest at Thanksgiving dinner instead of one of the courses.

"I think he gets a pardon. I couldn't look him in the eye and in good faith go ahead with it," Carbonaro said. "He's definitely going to be a guest of honor at our Thanksgiving dinner."

Carbonaro said she plans to look into donating Rockefeller to a local nature museum after the holiday.

----------------------
Huge Beaver wreaking havoc...

Residents near Kane Meadows Park in Blaine, Minn., are used to seeing wild animals, but it's a rare day that sees a trapper snare a 75-pound beaver.

The behemoth of a beaver was pulled out of a ditch along a mile-long walking path where beavers had built a dam near a storm water pond, blocking the flow of storm water runoff into nearby Rice Creek.

So, the Rice Creek Watershed District hired the trapper to remove them from the area because they were causing damage along the trail, but they were shocked when the trapper caught one that weighed as much as a medium-sized dog.

The semi-aquatic rodent species is known to grow up to 60 pounds in the wild.

---------------------------

Bikini barking! The scantily-clad protester who�s refusing to wear anything else or eat� until she finds her pet chihuahua

Arlene Mossa Corona wore a bikini and held up a sign with pictures of her dog Chispeta at an intersection in San Deigo this week.

Corona said she tried everything to find her dog, from calling the pound to contacting a pet psychic.

The only other option was to wear her bikini in the 50-degree weather and not eat until she finds the dog. She listed her phone number and multiple pictures of Chispeta on her signs.

�Against my family's wishes, I will be skipping my family Thanksgiving celebration this year and standing out there alone in an effort to be reunited with my dog,� she said. �Thanksgiving won't be the same without Chispita.�

Cars honked and men whistled and shouted cat-calls at the woman as she held up her sign, wearing red pumps, and a skimpy bikini.

A maintenance worker in her complex told Corona that he saw a girl take the dog. Corona believes that if the dog was stolen, whoever took it may be too afraid to return it.