Displaying items by tag: Endangered animals

Talkin' Pets News

September 23, 2017

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Karen Vance

Producer - Daisey Charlotte

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Pet Expert and Trainer Travis Brorsen will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/23/17 at 5pm EST to discuss his new series My Big Fat Pet Makeover on Animal Planet

Becky Robinson, President and Founder of Alley Cat Allies will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/23/17 at 630pm EST to discuss their organization and their efforts in hurricane relief

 

SAN FRANCISCO – From endangered Asian rhinos to nearly extinct mountain yellow-legged frogs, San Francisco Zoo & Gardens’ role in protecting and conserving wildlife was the theme of its signature fundraiser, ZooFest, on Saturday, April 30.   Honored guest U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein spoke about her love of animals and decades of conservation work, including her latest effort to end poaching with the introduction of S. 27, Wildlife Trafficking Enforcement Act. 

At the event, SF Zoo announced and unveiled the “Dianne Feinstein and Richard Blum Animal Wellness and Conservation Center,” one of the only dedicated facilities in the country to improving husbandry and well-being of Zoo animals.

SF Zoo President Tanya M. Peterson delivered remarks while holding a ball python snake, one of the Zoo’s many resident rescue animals. 

“About 30 percent of our animals are rescued, which is more than most zoos in the country,” said Peterson.  “Thank you to all the donors, members and guests who make it possible to not only save these animals, but communicate important conservation stories to the community for a multiplier effect.”

All funds raised at ZooFest benefit the care and comfort of the animals and help the Zoo accomplish its mission to connect people with wildlife, inspire caring for nature and advance conservation action.  One generous and anonymous donor gifted $100,000 to the Mexican gray wolf exhibit.  The habitat, under construction now, will help SF Zoo care for three incoming animals.  Mexican gray wolves, which were nearly extinct, are part of a Species Survival Plan, and the wolves coming to the Zoo may someday be released back into the wild.  Silent auction items included paintings from the inaugural Animal Artists in Residence project, which sold for nearly $50,000.  

Event chairs, Elizabeth and Steven Revetria and Charlot and Gregory Malin, helped pay tribute to

the 40th Anniversary of the Zoo’s groundbreaking Nature Trail, an educational program which teaches young people to be wildlife conservation ambassadors.  Attendees also viewed lions and tigers inside the Lion House and interacted with ambassador animals from the Koret Animal Resource Center, typically utilized for children’s educational purposes.

About the San Francisco Zoo

Established in 1929, the San Francisco Zoo and Gardens connects people to wildlife, inspires caring for nature and advances conservation action. An urban oasis, the Zoo and Gardens are home to more than 2,000 exotic, endangered and rescued animals representing more than 250 species as well as seven distinct gardens full of native and unusual plants. Located at the edge of the Pacific Ocean where the Great Highway meets Sloat Boulevard, the Zoo is open 365 days a year from 10 am to 5 pm (summer hours) and is accessible by San Francisco MUNI "L" Taraval Line.

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Global March for Elephants, Rhinos & Lions October 4, 2014
On Saturday Oct. 4th, there is a VERY IMPORTANT global event that needs our support. It is the GLOBAL MARCH FOR ELEPHANTS, RHINOS, AND LIONS. Tippi Hedren will be there speaking on behalf of the Lions in the Wild and Captivity which are in danger. PLEASE read the accompanying message. For details on when and where to go link to: https://www.facebook.com/events/1449025795334300/ 
 
 

LOS ANGELES, CA - On Saturday, October 4, 2014, Los Angeles joins 116 cities on 6 continents in the Global March for Elephants, Rhinos, and Lions, the biggest international event ever held to save Earth's vanishing wildlife.  Our goal is to draw attention to the crisis facing elephants, rhinos, and lions and to call for an end to the global trade in ivory, rhino horn, and other wildlife body parts (such as lion and tiger bones) that's pushing countless endangered species rapidly towards extinction.

The illegal wildlife trade is a transnational business that funds criminal syndicates, fuels conflict in Africa, and poses environmental, development and security challenges. It's also a lucrative business, generating an estimated USD$20 billion per year.

At the launch of United for Wildlife's #WhoseSideAreYouOn campaign, in June this year, HRH Duke of Cambridge said, "There are two thousand critically endangered species on the verge of being lost forever.  It's time to choose a side - between the endangered animals and the criminals who kill them for money. I am calling on people all around the world to tell us: whose side are you on?"

The answer will be loud and clear from the thousands of people in over 116 cities worldwide joining the march on October 4, 2014. Ricky Gervais has voiced his support of the event, saying "How can we allow the extinction of 2 magnificent creatures for the sake of some morons owning tasteless trinkets or trying fake medicine?"

Also in support of the global march, Joanna Lumley, OBE and Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, says "If we stand by and watch the brutal extinction of rhino and elephant, the stain of shame on our human consciousness will never be forgiven or forgotten."

The organizers of the grassroots event say that, "only a truly worldwide effort will stop our globally iconic species being sold into extinction," explaining, "World Animal Day this year must focus on action - individuals, peoples, governments - all of us must act to end the vile trade in endangered species."

Officially acknowledged by United For Wildlife as an event that will raise awareness about the challenges facing the world's wildlife, organizers hope the event will also help to reduce demand for endangered species 'products' and will be pushing for governments to ban all commercial trading of endangered wildlife and to put an end to wildlife trafficking.

"Individuals, and society as a whole, can choose to shun ivory, rhino horn, lion and tiger bones as commodities," say event organizers, "but we need governments to play their part too, by increasing penalties for bribery, corruption and trafficking offenses, and by shutting down all ivory retail outlets and ivory carving factories, for example." The event will also call on governments to publically destroy their stockpiles of illegal wildlife products, to show "zero tolerance for illegal trading."

In Africa four elephants are illegally killed for their ivory every hour, and estimates are that between only 300,000 to 500,000 survive today. It is estimated that less than 22,000 African rhino now remain: every nine hours one is killed for their horn. As for the 'king of the jungle,' in South Africa more lions survive now in captivity, where they are bred for petting zoos and then canned hunting, than roam in the wild.

Their path to extinction is very clear and the culprit is well understood. "Ivory, rhino horn, lion and tiger bones continue to be sold to feed a relentless and growing demand, largely in Asia, where the body parts of these endangered animals are still viewed as highly sought after products," explain event organizers. 

The ivory and rhino horn trade is particularly cruel and gruesome, not only do poachers indiscriminately slaughter adults, babies or whole herds alike, but often hack off an elephant's tusks or rhino's horns while they are still alive. "When it comes to choosing between saving the elephant, rhino and lion from extinction or slaughtering them for some mythical unproven medicinal property or want for an expensive carving to show social status, we've made our choice," event organizers say. We want them to live.

MARCH & RALLY DETAILS

  • WHEN: Saturday, October 4, 2014 | 11am - 2pm
  • WHERE: La Brea Tar Pits, 5801 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036. Front of the Page Museum at the lion statue.
  • EVENT DETAILS (pre-march):
    • Begins at 11am. Education ambassadors Tippi Hedren from the Shambala Preserve, Catherine Doyle from the PAWS sanctuary, Carolyn Merino Mullins from The Museum of Animals & Society, Matt Rossell from ADI, Michelle Cho from the Humane Society, Lisa Levinson from IDA, and other experts will be on hand, as well as child ambassadors, to help people understand the crisis facing each animal and how to take action to save them.
    • There will be kids' art and face painting. 
  • MARCH DETAILS:
    • Begins promptly at Noon. Marchers will walk down Wilshire Blvd to the South African Consulate then return for a rally. People are invited to march with signs showing their business or group supports saving these endangered animals.
  • RALLY DETAILS (post-march):
    • Begins when marchers return to the La Brea Tar Pits at approximately 1pm
    • Will be a festive, kid-friendly, educational event
    • Musical performances by African drummers, Kat Kramer singing "Bless the Beasts and the Children," and the Agape Youth Choir
    • Keynote speaker: Dr. Reese Halter, an award-winning broadcaster, author of nine books, and distinguished conservation biologist.
    • Special guests
  • MORE INFORMATION:
 

Our Mission

The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, founded in 1995, is the nation's largest natural habitat refuge developed specifically for endangered African and Asian elephants. The Sanctuary operates on 2,700 acres in Hohenwald, Tennessee — 85 miles southwest of Nashville.

The Elephant Sanctuary exists for two reasons:

  • To provide a haven for old, sick or needy elephants in a setting of green pastures,
    dense forests, spring-fed ponds and heated barns for cold winter nights.
  • To provide education about the crisis facing these social, sensitive, passionately intense,
    playful, complex, exceedingly intelligent and endangered creatures.

The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

Accredited by The Association of Sanctuaries
Licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA)

www.elephants.com