Displaying items by tag: Cats

Natural Healing for Cat, Dogs, Horses and Other Animals

Arizona to Alaska

Born in Phoenix, Lisa lived in numerous Arizona towns as a child and later spent several years in California. By young adulthood, she was in Alaska and started mountain climbing. She climbed in South America on different expeditions, seeking summits in Ecuador, Chile and Argentina. She also traveled solo through Europe and Asia.

 

From Fire to Shield to Evergreen

Climbing left Lisa wanting strong first-aid skills and she signed-up for an Emergency Medical Technician course. The class included a ride-along with the Fire Department which exposed her to the rewards of helping people in crisis. She moved to Oregon for training and was soon back in Alaska, pulling 24-hour shifts as a paramedic.

 

“Paramedicine is physical and autonomous and demanding and technical. I loved it.”

After a number of years, she transferred to the Police Department. Her second career started with the position of street officer and she still claims it is the most demanding job in law enforcement. After a few years, she became a detective, working in the Vice unit and later in Crimes Against Children, with a special assignment as a Hostage Negotiator. She went back to the street as a sergeant and later returned to investigations, supervising Internal Affairs.

 

“All those years in emergency services made the city a map of memories, many of them very sad. I wanted to move…a couple of thousand miles.”

 

Riding, Writing and Running

Lisa and her husband relocated to the Evergreen State and adopted two former racehorses from a rescue facility. She turned to writing, working on both mysteries and mainstream novels. One novel was selected as a finalist in the 2007 Malice Domestic contest and another made the Top 100 in the 2008 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award contest. Lisa also began competing in the obscure sport of Ride and Tie, a back country trail race that combines running and riding, covering distances of 20-35 miles.

 

“Writing is such a sedentary pursuit, it would be dreadful without the promise of hours on trails.”

 

Miles alone on the million acres that is Washington’s Olympic Peninsula left Lisa wanting protective company. She found a German Shepherd at a pet rescue site and taught him tracking, as she had with her previous dogs.

 

“My last shepherd earned the FH title twice. This was before the existence of the FHII and VST titles. He also earned the Schutzhund III with decent scores, but we never V-scored”. (The FH, or FährtenHund, is a German sport tracking degree. A V-score is a judge’s rating at or above 96%.)

 

She resurrected the training log (the Canine Scent Work Log) she had created and used when teaching her previous trackers. Her rescue dog V-scored at his first trial and she sent the log to Alpine Publications. Alpine released the book in 2007

TALKIN PETS NEWS
Saturday, Jan. 28, the 28th day of 2012. There are 338 days left in the year.

Los Angeles, Calif., January 10, 2012 – Stray Cat Alliance’s “I Spayed L.A.” program kicked off late last year in South Los Angeles, and is already making progress toward serving the feral, stray and homeless cat population. I Spayed L.A. provides L.A.’s poorest demographic areas with spay/neuter and other health services for cats and kittens, both owned and free-roaming in the neighborhood.
 
The program, unique in the nation, is expected to take three years. It began in the zip code 90037, an area just south of the USC campus with a population of about 60,000 residents and 10,000 cats.
 
Stray Cat Alliance, a nonprofit with an 11-year history of serving Los Angeles, along with local organizational partners, more than 60 volunteers, and residents of 90037, canvasses the neighborhood on an ongoing basis to offer information about spay/neuter services. Like a grassroots political campaign, I Spayed L.A. uses proven community organizing tactics. Volunteers go door-to-door; block and neighborhood captains provide information and resources so local residents are empowered to help their own communities. Stray Cat Alliance has set up two trap depots in the area, and is teaching residents how to use them humanely. Spay/neuters are performed locally at Animal Rescue Center in South Los Angeles, and paid for by Stray Cat Alliance.
 
“I can’t say enough about the work that Stray Cat Alliance is doing in South Los Angeles,” said Animal Planet’s Jackson Galaxy, animal behaviorist and star of “My Cat from Hell.” “From hands-on rescue to educating the community about responsible pet care, I Spayed L.A. is a model program for trap/neuter/return that urban areas all over the country should be implementing.”
 
“U2” and Jay MacNeal, currently homeless in the 90037 area, help feed and take care of cats, even sharing their own dinners with the local cats if necessary. “There are a lot of stray cats around here,” said U2. “They keep getting pregnant over and over again. Get your cats spayed or neutered and stop the population, because no one wants to take care of them.”
 
In addition to nearly 300 cats already spayed/neutered by Stray Cat Alliance, the organization has saved numerous abandoned, injured, ill and dying animals in 90037. In just one day, three dogs, two cats and two kittens were rescued, treated for injuries, and placed into foster homes.
 
“I Spayed L.A. is a partnership with community residents to give them the tools and resources they need to continue this work,” said Stray Cat Alliance executive director Christi Metropole. “We know that even if we came in and fixed every single cat, two years later, the population would return to its original numbers. Our goal is to change hearts and minds so there is ongoing positive momentum, and 90037 can solve this problem without outside help.”
 
Stray Cat Alliance estimates that by sterilizing 70 percent or more of all cats in this zip code over the next three years, it would eliminate, or nearly eliminate, intakes from that zip code at the South Los Angeles shelter, where the kill rate for cats exceed 80 percent.
 
About Stray Cat Alliance
Stray Cat Alliance works for a no-kill nation, where every cat has a right to be safe, healthy and valued. Since 2000, it has empowered hundreds of volunteers and thousands of community members to care for more than 75,000 Southern California cats in need. Stray Cat Alliance performs Trap-Neuter-Return and other health services, and runs an adoption program in Los Angeles, placing thousands of cats in homes. Stray Cat Alliance advocates humane care of homeless cats, and reducing kill rates for cats in shelters today. See www.StrayCatAlliance.org for more information.
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GUILTY VERDICT IN WASHINGTON, DC CAT-POISONING CASE

Alley Cat Allies welcomes conviction; calls for Dauphine’s dismissal from Smithsonian Institution

 

 

BETHESDA, MD —Alley Cat Allies, the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats, today welcomed the guilty verdict in the case of Nico Dauphine, a Smithsonian researcher charged with attempting to poison a colony of feral cats in a Washington, D.C. neighborhood.  

 

“We are satisfied with this verdict,” said Becky Robinson, president of Alley Cat Allies.  “Americans care about cats and will not tolerate cruelty towards them.  We are grateful to law enforcement and to the prosecutors for treating this crime with the seriousness it deserved.”

 

Dauphine, a researcher at the Smithsonian Institution’s Migratory Bird Center, was found guilty of misdemeanor cruelty after an investigation last spring showed her in video surveillance placing rat poison in the cats’ food bowls. 

 

Research summaries posted to the Migratory Bird Center’s web site indicate that one of Dauphine’s research projects involved “mounting small cameras on domestic cats that roam outdoors to see how they affect wild bird populations,” putting Dauphine in direct contact with cats.

 

“We call on the Smithsonian to immediately dismiss Ms. Dauphine from her position and cancel any research projects in which she was involved,” said Robinson.  “Her conviction for attempting to kill cats, along with her history of condemning cats in research, leaves her work suspect of major bias.  Her work should be discredited and disregarded by the scientific community.”

 

“Killing cats is illegal, and feral cats are protected under the law,” said Robinson. “Anti-cruelty laws protect all cats—pet, stray, or feral—in every state and the District of Columbia. Americans who are demanding humane approaches for cats are not going to allow this kind of cruelty to go unpunished.”

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About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies is the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats.  Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 260,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities, and organizations save and improve the lives cats and kittens nationwide.  Their web site is www.alleycat.org.



DreamWorks Animation presents a 90 minute, PG, adventure, action, fantasy, comedy, animation in 3D, directed by Chris Miller and written by Charles Perrault and Brian Lynch with a theatrical release of October 28, 2011.

Talkin Pets Radio
Oct. 22, the 295th day of 2011.
There are 70 days left in the year.

SEAACA & Pet-Connections to Provide No-Cost Spay & Neuter Programs for Owned Free-Roaming Cats

(LOS ANGELES, CA) August 11, 2011 - SEAACA (Southeast Area Animal Control Authority; www.seaaca.org) and Pet-Connections are helping cat owners who live in the 14 cities served by SEAACA with the BIG MEOW, a compelling program to provide no-cost spay and neuter serviced for owned free-roaming cats. The year long, national program kicks off at SEAACA on August 17 with photo opportunities during cat drop-off (7:15 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.) and pick-up (2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.). 



SEAACA and Pet-Connections will offer a variety of services for owned free-roaming cats at absolutely no cost to cat owners. Services include spay or neuter, microchip ID (so cats have permanent ID in addition to a collar), vaccines (FVRCP and rabies), one month application of flea and tick control and basic health care at the time of surgery. 



The BIG MEOW is a significant step in improving cat health and curtailing overpopulation. Spayed or neutered cats tend to want to stay inside with their families. Cats that roam, however, can get lost, hit by passing cars, be exposed to pesticides, poisons or unhealthy plants and disturb neighbors. Moreover, an un-spayed female cat, her mate and all of their offspring, producing two litters per year, with 2.8 surviving kittens per litter, can result in thousands of cats (over 2,000 cats in four years and over 370,000 cats in seven years!).



“The BIG MEOW delivers monumental benefits for everyone,” noted SEAACA Executive Director, Dan Morrison. “It helps owned free-roaming cats lead safer, healthier lives. It also helps manage the surplus cat problem, and the no-cost element helps personal finances in tough economic times,” he added.
 

The Big Meow will result in over 50 surgeries at SEAACA on the “kick-off day” (August 17) with partner veterinarians in private practice performing another 100 to 150 surgeries on that day; the annual goal for SEAACA is 3,000 surgeries. The Inland Valley Humane Society is concurrently doing the same program. 



In order to participate in the BIG MEOW, cats must be four months to seven years of age. Only owned free-roaming cats are eligible (no feral or wild cats will be accepted). Additionally, cat owners must provide proof of residency in SEAACA service cities and each cat must be in a properly secured kennel or carrier.



For more information about the BIG MEOW or SEAACA, please visit www.seaaca.org, or call the appointment line at 562-803-3301 ext. 251.   

About SEAACA 

SEAACA (Southeast Area Animal Control Authority) provides animal care and control services for 14 cities in southeast Los Angeles County and northern Orange County, including Bell Gardens, Bellflower, Buena Park, Downey, Lakewood, La Palma, Montebello, Norwalk, Paramount, Pico Rivera, Santa Fe Springs, South El Monte, South Gate and Vernon. SEAACA's Animal Care Center located in Downey reunites pet owners with lost pets and assists new pet owners with pet adoptions. SEAACA’s Animal Wellness Clinic, also located in Downey, spays and neuters all adoption animals plus provides vaccinations and microchipping to the general public. For more information about SEAACA, please visitwww.seaaca.org.



About Pet-Connections

Pet Connections, Inc. is a national organization dedicated to developing coalitions between pet owners, community leaders and animal welfare organizations to reduce the number of stray and unwanted cats and dogs.
 
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HSUS Grants to LSU Shelter Program Now Total $800,000

(August 10, 2011) BATON ROUGE—The Humane Society of the United States donated $200,000 to the shelter medicine program at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine. The LSU-SVM’s shelter medicine program gives veterinary students the opportunity to learn about medical care for dogs and cats in animal shelters and develop primary care and surgery skills while providing their services and expertise to animal shelters in south Louisiana. 

With the $200,000 grant from The HSUS, the LSU-SVM will extend its efforts to serve some of the shelters in areas outside of southern Louisiana, such as those in central and north Louisiana. The HSUS had previously given $600,000 to LSU-SVM in support of the shelter medicine program, which currently serves animal shelters or animal control centers in the parishes of Ascension, Calcasieu, East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Iberville, Jefferson, Lafayette, Livingston, Orleans, Plaquemines, Pointe Coupee, St. Bernard, St. Charles, St. John, St. Martin, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa and West Baton Rouge. 

“The HSUS grant will extend the reach of our program and allow our students and faculty  to engage with the community in service partnerships that will help make the shelters better, and most importantly help more homeless animals find good homes,” said Joseph Taboada, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, associate dean for student and academic affairs at the LSU-SVM. “We are certainly grateful for the tremendous support of The HSUS in helping us to establish this program and for its ongoing commitment to sustaining excellence in this important program.” 

The primary purpose of the grant is to provide veterinary students at LSU-SVM surgical and hands-on experience while also contributing to the needs of animal control facilities and animal shelters in underserved communities in Louisiana.  Emphasis of this service learning initiative will be on animal wellness, pet population dynamics, disaster medicine, animal behavior and animal welfare. 

“Superior veterinary care at public and private community shelters in Louisiana, and better access to spaying and neutering services, are signature goals of The HSUS, and crucial elements of our broader initiative to improve the lives of dogs and cats in the state, and to end the euthanasia of healthy and treatable pets,” said Andrew Rowan, PhD, HSUS chief scientific officer. “A vibrant shelter medicine program at LSU-SVM, one that extends itself to underserved communities, is essential to those goals, and one of the most fundamental contributions we could hope to make to animal welfare in Louisiana.” 

The Shelter Medicine and Population Control rotation at LSU-SVM is an elective student rotation that can be taken by third- and fourth-year students during the clinical portion of the veterinary curriculum. The rotation was developed using grants from The HSUS and the American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and has evolved into one of the most popular elective rotations offered at the LSU-SVM. The program has approximately 120 to 130 students enrolled in this curriculum each year. 

“This HSUS grant gives us funding for a shelter medicine fellowship position, which will help us expand into other parts of Louisiana,” said Wendy Wolfson, DVM (LSU-SVM 1986) veterinary surgery instructor and director of the shelter medicine program. “Our goal is to have decreased euthanasia rates in the shelters through better animal health care, provide healthier animals for adoption and encourage students to volunteer or seek employment in shelters once they graduate.”  

The shelter medicine program has now grown to include 23 shelters, in some instances providing consultation on an as needed basis, while in others serving as the main source of veterinary/spay/neuter care. Over the past two years, the students on the shelter medicine rotation have evaluated over 3,500 animals and participated in over 1,400 surgeries at shelters. Nearly 1,500 surgeries on shelter and feral animals have been performed at the LSU-SVM. These efforts have undoubtedly had a positive impact on adoptions in the shelters served, as well as on the primary care and surgery skills of the students involved. 

The Shelter Medicine and Population Control rotation has four main objectives: 

  1. Expose veterinary students to shelter medicine in a service learning setting in which they develop an understanding of the role of shelters in the community and how a veterinarian can have a positive impact on both the shelter and the community through their involvement with the shelters.  
  2. Supply veterinary care and consulting to shelters in south Louisiana and in doing so expose students to spay/neuter and other primary care learning opportunities.  
  3. Through a partnership with Louisiana State Animal Response Team (LSART), to supply the infrastructure to respond to emergency needs in the case of natural disasters affecting the region and to expose veterinary students to the role that a veterinarian can play in disaster response.  
  4.  Develop veterinary student communication skills through teaching opportunities with shelter personnel and local high schools.  

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 LSU-SVM Mission:

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine is a dynamic community dedicated to saving lives, finding cures, and changing lives through outstanding clinical and community service, educational excellence, and groundbreaking research. 

Twitter: LSUVetMed

Facebook Fan Page: LSU School of Veterinary Medicine    

Follow The HSUS on Twitter.

See our work for animals on your iPhone by searching “HumaneTV” in the App Store.

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization – backed by 11 million Americans, or one of every 28. For more than a half-century, The HSUS has been fighting for the protection of all animals through advocacy, education and hands-on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty -- On the web at
humanesociety.org.

  



Columbia Pictures, Sony Pictures Animation and The K Entertainment Company present an 86 minute, PG animated family comedy directed by Raja Gosnell, written by Peyo and J. David Stem with a release date of July 29, 2011.

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