Displaying items by tag: Cats

Talkin Pets Radio
Oct. 22, the 295th day of 2011.
There are 70 days left in the year.

SEAACA & Pet-Connections to Provide No-Cost Spay & Neuter Programs for Owned Free-Roaming Cats

(LOS ANGELES, CA) August 11, 2011 - SEAACA (Southeast Area Animal Control Authority; www.seaaca.org) and Pet-Connections are helping cat owners who live in the 14 cities served by SEAACA with the BIG MEOW, a compelling program to provide no-cost spay and neuter serviced for owned free-roaming cats. The year long, national program kicks off at SEAACA on August 17 with photo opportunities during cat drop-off (7:15 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.) and pick-up (2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.). 



SEAACA and Pet-Connections will offer a variety of services for owned free-roaming cats at absolutely no cost to cat owners. Services include spay or neuter, microchip ID (so cats have permanent ID in addition to a collar), vaccines (FVRCP and rabies), one month application of flea and tick control and basic health care at the time of surgery. 



The BIG MEOW is a significant step in improving cat health and curtailing overpopulation. Spayed or neutered cats tend to want to stay inside with their families. Cats that roam, however, can get lost, hit by passing cars, be exposed to pesticides, poisons or unhealthy plants and disturb neighbors. Moreover, an un-spayed female cat, her mate and all of their offspring, producing two litters per year, with 2.8 surviving kittens per litter, can result in thousands of cats (over 2,000 cats in four years and over 370,000 cats in seven years!).



“The BIG MEOW delivers monumental benefits for everyone,” noted SEAACA Executive Director, Dan Morrison. “It helps owned free-roaming cats lead safer, healthier lives. It also helps manage the surplus cat problem, and the no-cost element helps personal finances in tough economic times,” he added.
 

The Big Meow will result in over 50 surgeries at SEAACA on the “kick-off day” (August 17) with partner veterinarians in private practice performing another 100 to 150 surgeries on that day; the annual goal for SEAACA is 3,000 surgeries. The Inland Valley Humane Society is concurrently doing the same program. 



In order to participate in the BIG MEOW, cats must be four months to seven years of age. Only owned free-roaming cats are eligible (no feral or wild cats will be accepted). Additionally, cat owners must provide proof of residency in SEAACA service cities and each cat must be in a properly secured kennel or carrier.



For more information about the BIG MEOW or SEAACA, please visit www.seaaca.org, or call the appointment line at 562-803-3301 ext. 251.   

About SEAACA 

SEAACA (Southeast Area Animal Control Authority) provides animal care and control services for 14 cities in southeast Los Angeles County and northern Orange County, including Bell Gardens, Bellflower, Buena Park, Downey, Lakewood, La Palma, Montebello, Norwalk, Paramount, Pico Rivera, Santa Fe Springs, South El Monte, South Gate and Vernon. SEAACA's Animal Care Center located in Downey reunites pet owners with lost pets and assists new pet owners with pet adoptions. SEAACA’s Animal Wellness Clinic, also located in Downey, spays and neuters all adoption animals plus provides vaccinations and microchipping to the general public. For more information about SEAACA, please visitwww.seaaca.org.



About Pet-Connections

Pet Connections, Inc. is a national organization dedicated to developing coalitions between pet owners, community leaders and animal welfare organizations to reduce the number of stray and unwanted cats and dogs.
 
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HSUS Grants to LSU Shelter Program Now Total $800,000

(August 10, 2011) BATON ROUGE—The Humane Society of the United States donated $200,000 to the shelter medicine program at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine. The LSU-SVM’s shelter medicine program gives veterinary students the opportunity to learn about medical care for dogs and cats in animal shelters and develop primary care and surgery skills while providing their services and expertise to animal shelters in south Louisiana. 

With the $200,000 grant from The HSUS, the LSU-SVM will extend its efforts to serve some of the shelters in areas outside of southern Louisiana, such as those in central and north Louisiana. The HSUS had previously given $600,000 to LSU-SVM in support of the shelter medicine program, which currently serves animal shelters or animal control centers in the parishes of Ascension, Calcasieu, East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Iberville, Jefferson, Lafayette, Livingston, Orleans, Plaquemines, Pointe Coupee, St. Bernard, St. Charles, St. John, St. Martin, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa and West Baton Rouge. 

“The HSUS grant will extend the reach of our program and allow our students and faculty  to engage with the community in service partnerships that will help make the shelters better, and most importantly help more homeless animals find good homes,” said Joseph Taboada, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, associate dean for student and academic affairs at the LSU-SVM. “We are certainly grateful for the tremendous support of The HSUS in helping us to establish this program and for its ongoing commitment to sustaining excellence in this important program.” 

The primary purpose of the grant is to provide veterinary students at LSU-SVM surgical and hands-on experience while also contributing to the needs of animal control facilities and animal shelters in underserved communities in Louisiana.  Emphasis of this service learning initiative will be on animal wellness, pet population dynamics, disaster medicine, animal behavior and animal welfare. 

“Superior veterinary care at public and private community shelters in Louisiana, and better access to spaying and neutering services, are signature goals of The HSUS, and crucial elements of our broader initiative to improve the lives of dogs and cats in the state, and to end the euthanasia of healthy and treatable pets,” said Andrew Rowan, PhD, HSUS chief scientific officer. “A vibrant shelter medicine program at LSU-SVM, one that extends itself to underserved communities, is essential to those goals, and one of the most fundamental contributions we could hope to make to animal welfare in Louisiana.” 

The Shelter Medicine and Population Control rotation at LSU-SVM is an elective student rotation that can be taken by third- and fourth-year students during the clinical portion of the veterinary curriculum. The rotation was developed using grants from The HSUS and the American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and has evolved into one of the most popular elective rotations offered at the LSU-SVM. The program has approximately 120 to 130 students enrolled in this curriculum each year. 

“This HSUS grant gives us funding for a shelter medicine fellowship position, which will help us expand into other parts of Louisiana,” said Wendy Wolfson, DVM (LSU-SVM 1986) veterinary surgery instructor and director of the shelter medicine program. “Our goal is to have decreased euthanasia rates in the shelters through better animal health care, provide healthier animals for adoption and encourage students to volunteer or seek employment in shelters once they graduate.”  

The shelter medicine program has now grown to include 23 shelters, in some instances providing consultation on an as needed basis, while in others serving as the main source of veterinary/spay/neuter care. Over the past two years, the students on the shelter medicine rotation have evaluated over 3,500 animals and participated in over 1,400 surgeries at shelters. Nearly 1,500 surgeries on shelter and feral animals have been performed at the LSU-SVM. These efforts have undoubtedly had a positive impact on adoptions in the shelters served, as well as on the primary care and surgery skills of the students involved. 

The Shelter Medicine and Population Control rotation has four main objectives: 

  1. Expose veterinary students to shelter medicine in a service learning setting in which they develop an understanding of the role of shelters in the community and how a veterinarian can have a positive impact on both the shelter and the community through their involvement with the shelters.  
  2. Supply veterinary care and consulting to shelters in south Louisiana and in doing so expose students to spay/neuter and other primary care learning opportunities.  
  3. Through a partnership with Louisiana State Animal Response Team (LSART), to supply the infrastructure to respond to emergency needs in the case of natural disasters affecting the region and to expose veterinary students to the role that a veterinarian can play in disaster response.  
  4.  Develop veterinary student communication skills through teaching opportunities with shelter personnel and local high schools.  

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 LSU-SVM Mission:

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine is a dynamic community dedicated to saving lives, finding cures, and changing lives through outstanding clinical and community service, educational excellence, and groundbreaking research. 

Twitter: LSUVetMed

Facebook Fan Page: LSU School of Veterinary Medicine    

Follow The HSUS on Twitter.

See our work for animals on your iPhone by searching “HumaneTV” in the App Store.

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization – backed by 11 million Americans, or one of every 28. For more than a half-century, The HSUS has been fighting for the protection of all animals through advocacy, education and hands-on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty -- On the web at
humanesociety.org.

  



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