Displaying items by tag: zoo

Ventura County, CA – Oct. 15, 2017 – Staff at the Turtle Conservancy are celebrating the hatching of three Critically Endangered Pan’s Box Turtles (Cuora pani) this week at their conservation center in California.  It is the first time the Turtle Conservancy has hatched this species and the first second generation breeding of this species in the United States. Pan's Box Turtles are understood to be effectively extinct in its native China due to over-collection for the medicinal and pet trade.

“This is a critical step forward for Pan’s Box Turtle, a unique and little-known species that really needs more attention,” said Dr. Peter Paul van Dijk, Field Conservation Programs Director at the Turtle Conservancy. “Our efforts, along with those of our global partners, will contribute to ensuring their future on this planet.

This hatching success was years in the making. The parents hatched at the Fort Worth Zoo and Zoo Atlanta as part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Program (SSP). They came to the Turtle Conservancy in 2010 where they grew to adulthood and bred for the first time this spring. The Turtle Conservancy is home to one male and four female adult Pan’s Box Turtles, along with dozens of other species of threatened turtles and tortoises.

These animals represent a part of the North American “assurance colony” that is a last line of defense against extinction, with the ultimate goal of restoring wild populations. The Turtle Conservancy was the first organization in the world to return captive-born turtles to their native country for conservation when they sent young Golden Coin Turtles back to Hong Kong in 2012.

“We’ve been successful returning animals back to their native country in the past,” said Turtle Conservancy co-founder and president Eric Goode. “With this species that will be a much more daunting task, but my dream is to let all wild animals be exactly that, wild.”

The species is endemic to a small area of Central China, and may have been relatively common locally until the 1990s, when turtles increasingly became the focus of the traditional Chinese medicine markets. Now, China has grown into the largest market for turtles and tortoises in the world. Turtles and many other animals are collected and sold into the traditional medicine and food trade in massive quantities, while the exotic pet hobby is growing rapidly. The Pan’s Box Turtle can fetch prices upwards of $10,000 in the animal trade.

The Conservancy protects more than 45,000 acres world-wide of wild land for endangered turtles and tortoises, along with other threatened species including jaguars, macaws and antelope, and native flora. It is their hope they can continue to protect viable habitat for other species, including the Pan’s Box Turtle

Additional Info:

  • Pan’s Box Turtle is classified as Critically Endangered in the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species [http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/5956/0].
  • Turtles and tortoises are the most endangered group of vertebrates on the planet. Over half of the 365 species of turtles and tortoises are threatened with, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
  • The Turtle Conservancy works to alleviate threats to highly threatened turtles around the world by protecting land and captive breeding endangered species
  • Asia is the world’s largest consumer of turtles – for the food, traditional medicine and pet trade
  • The Chinese turtle industry has surpassed $1 billion annually in gross revenue
  • The Turtle Conservancy is the only AZA-certified facility dedicated solely to the conservation of turtles and tortoises. 
  • Zoos in North America and elsewhere maintain Studbooks of captive animals to ensure long-term genetic diversity and maintain records of endangered species reproductive success

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Photo: A Critically Endangered Pan’s Box Turtle breaks through its egg and takes its first breath at the Turtle Conservancy in California. (Photo by Max Maurer/Turtle Conservancy)

The Turtle Conservancy is a 501(c)3 organization dedicated to protecting threatened turtles and tortoises and their habitats worldwide. The Conservancy's Conservation Center in Southern California is a premier facility for breeding Critically Endangered turtles and tortoises in the world. Since 2005 the Conservancy has combined this highly successful breeding program with protecting land in Africa, Asia, and North America.

Note to the Media: If you would like to guide your readers or viewers to a Web link where they can learn more about turtle conservation and perhaps make donations in support of helping save wildlife and wild places, please direct them to www.turtleconservancy.org

SAN FRANCISCO – The San Francisco Zoo & Gardens invites guests to celebrate Lunar New Year with two full weekends of fun and entertainment at its 100-acre park, living classroom, conservation center and Zoo!  The festivities will be held Saturday and Sunday, January 28-29 and February 4-5 from 10:00-4:00 as guests are treated to traditional Chinese dance performances multiple times each day.  Embark on an adventure by navigating the Chinese Zodiac Animal Scavenger Hunt and be sure to visit SF Zoo’s Rhode Island red rooster “Mac” during the Year of the Rooster celebration.

San Francisco Zoo & Gardens guests born in the Year of the Rooster receive complimentary admission on January 28-29 and February 4-5.  Keeping with the Chinese calendar, the Zoo will honor birthdays in 2017, 2005, 1993, 1981, 1969, 1957, 1945, 1933, 1921 and 1909, as well as birthdays falling in January and February of the following year.

Event Details

What: Lunar New Year Celebration at San Francisco Zoo & Gardens

Where: San Francisco Zoo & Gardens, Great Highway and Sloat Blvd., San Francisco, CA 94132

When: January 28-29 and February 4-5 from 10:00-4:00

Visuals: Traditional Chinese dance performances, guests going on Chinese Zodiac Animal Scavenger Hunts, and more than 2,000 animals (including a rooster)

Best time for coverage: 11:00 am or 1:30 pm for the dance performances (11:00 and 12:30 on 2/5 only)

Event link: https://sfzoo.worldsecuresystems.com/announcements/lunar-new-year-2017

 

For planning purposes, below outlines upcoming February events:

  • February 1-28: Senior Sweetheart Month – Senior citizens ages 65 and older receive 2 for 1 admission
  • February 11: Members’ Morning – Exclusive access to the Zoo before gates open to the public
  • February 11-12: Will Zoo be Mine? – Take a “Lovers Stroll” and learn about animal mates, couples and families
  • February 18-20: Animals of America – Spend President’s Day Weekend visiting and learning about Zoo residents (many of them rescued) native to North America

About San Francisco Zoo & Gardens

Established in 1929, San Francisco Zoo & Gardens connects people to wildlife, inspires caring for nature and advances conservation action.  An urban oasis, the Zoo & Gardens are home to more than 2,000 exotic, endangered and rescued animals representing more than 250 species as well as seven distinct gardens full of native and unusual plants.  Located at the edge of the Pacific Ocean where the Great Highway meets Sloat Boulevard, the Zoo is open 365 days a year from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm (fall/winter) and is accessible by San Francisco MUNI "L" Taraval Line.  You can find us on the web at www.sfzoo.org.

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MIAMI, FLA. -OCTOBER 12, 2016 - The Zoological Wildlife Foundation (ZWF Miami) announces the arrival of its two newest tiger cubs, Harvey and Hailey, an adorable brother and sister pair.
 
"Harvey and Hailey are already playing and growing here at ZWF," said Mario Tabraue, President and Director of ZWF Miami. "The health and care of the animals at our zoo is our main concern, so we're happy the cubs are thriving" added Maria Tabraue, Vice President and director of the multi-acre private zoo located just south of Miami, FL.
 
The largest cat species, tigers reside in parts of Asia, Turkey and Russia. With approximately 3,500 of these big cats left in the wild, they are considered an endangered species. 
 
Harvey and Hailey were born at ZWF on September 6, 2016 from Metridies, one of our most beautiful big cats. The young cubs' diet consists of mainly milk, but they will slowly be introduced to meat in the weeks to come.
 
The cubs are currently available for encounters with visitors of ZWF. Guests will have a chance to meet them for a limited time for $80 + tax for adults and $40 + tax for children. To ensure the wellbeing of the cubs, the duration of each encounter is limited to 5 minutes.
 
To learn more about how you can schedule a visit to meet Harvey and Hailey as well as ZWF Miami's other resident animals, visit: www.zwfmiami.com.
 
ZWF Miami is located at 16225 SW 172 Avenue in Miami, Florida and is open to the public seven days a week. Tours of the park are available by appointment only. Call (305) 969-3696 for more information.
 
Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, for more exciting news and updates.
 
About the Zoological Wildlife Foundation:
Founded in 2001, the Zoological Wildlife Foundation (ZWF Miami) is an organization accredited by the Zoological Association of America that serves as a zoo and a conservation facility that is dedicated to educating the public about rare and endangered animal species in captivity and in the wild. Located south of Miami and spanning several breathtaking acres of land, ZWF Miami is home to everything from domestic animals, leopards, big cats primates, large predatory birds and mammals to dozens of exotic species, most of which are available for interactive encounters with the public.

 

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 “Meet the Animal Artist” Experience Added to Oakland Zoo’s Animals Saving Animals Annual Art Auction

Video Download for Media: https://www.dropbox.com/s/z95s1cgbcfrvanq/ArtExperience.mov?dl=0https://www.dropbox.com/s/z95s1cgbcfrvanq/ArtExperience.mov?dl=0 

Oakland, Calif. -- September 15, 2016 -- Oakland Zoo has added a new twist to the third year of their annual “Animals Saving Animals Art Show” to raise money for animal conservation. Bidding winners get to come to the Zoo to be part of the painting experience with the animal artist.

Zoos across the country now sell animal paintings as a way to fundraise, but Oakland Zoo wanted to enhance the concept by personalizing the experience. “We saw that people bought these artworks to connect with the animals, so we decided to offer an experience where people could meet an animal artist up-close and behind-the-scenes, for the ‘creative’ painting process.’ It’s an amazing way to connect with animals at the Zoo, support animal conservation in the wild – and, of course, acquire unique artwork,” said Erin Harrison, Sr. Manager of Marketing & PR at Oakland Zoo.

Artwork created by zoo animals is up for auction on eBay now through Thursday, September 22 at 11am. Artists featured in the Animal Art Show Experience include an elephant, lemur, goat, sun bear, giraffe, parrot, and green monkey. For a complete list of artist names, biographies and bidding link, and additional information on Oakland Zoo’s Animal Art Show Experience, go to: http://www.oaklandzoo.org/Animal_Art_Show_2016.php

“The Animal Art Show Experience is a triple win; it provides fun enrichment activity for our animals, helps support the conservation of wildlife, and draws public attention to the various conservation challenges that animals face,” said Amy Gotliffe, Conservation Director at Oakland Zoo. “The Animal Art Show is also a perfect example of how the entire Oakland Zoo staff embraces our conservation efforts, from our Marketing Department to our Animal Care team. We hope the lucky winners of this unique art know that they took action for wildlife every time they look at it.”

None of the animals are forced or coerced into participating in the Art Show. The painting sessions are conducted with zookeepers, using only positive-reinforcement methods to encourage voluntary participation. The paint used is non-toxic and water based. All funds raised from the auction will benefit Oakland Zoo’s conservation partners, who are working in the field to save wild animals.

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area's award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid's activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to the humane treatment of animals and wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide; with 25¢ from each ticket donated to support conservation partners and programs around the world. The California Trail, a transformational project that more than doubles our size, opens in 2018,

and will further our commitment to animal care, education, and conservation with a focus on this state’s remarkable native wildlife. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information, go to: www.oaklandzoo.org

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Baby Wallaroo Emerges from Mom’s Pouch at Oakland Zoo

Oakland, CA…August 4, 2016 – A baby wallaroo, called a joey, has emerged from mom’s pouch at Oakland Zoo. Wallaroos are a species similar to but smaller than a kangaroo. Too early yet to determine the baby’s sex, ZooKeepers are waiting to name the joey until a gender can be determined.

Although it’s impossible to determine an exact birthdate, zookeepers estimate it between October - November last year. Joeys are technically born after only one month's gestational period - fur-less, blind, and about the size of a kidney bean (1’’ long). The tiny newborn will crawl unaided from the birth canal to the mother’s pouch where it begins to nurse. There it will continue to develop, not making an appearance until it is six to eight months old. (Zooborns. (n.d.) Retrieved from: http://www.zooborns.com/zooborns/2011/05/baby-wallaroo-peeks-out-of-the-pouch.html

“We’re very excited about the arrival of this new joey, who brings our wallaroo “mob” - the term for a group of wallaroos - to 12. For guests who get a peek from our Outback Adventure Train, the joey can often be seen near its mother, sometimes resting in the shade during the warm summer days or foraging on the lush grass in the cooler morning and evening hours,” Valerie Salonga, Zookeeper.

Since a Joey will not start coming and going from the safety of its mom’s pouch with any regularity until approximately ten months of age, only recently has the youngster begun grazing on grass, eating food-pellets, and spending time with female wallaroos in the mob other than its mother. More active every week, the joey is still quite shy and mom, Tallara, remains very protective.

Zookeepers are giving mom and joey plenty of privacy during this transitional period, providing a morning diet in a holding area and allowing Tallara to choose whether or not to go on exhibit each day.

 

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area's award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid's activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to the humane treatment of animals and wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide; with 25¢ from each ticket donated to support conservation partners and programs around the world. The California Trail, a transformational project that more than doubles our size, opens in 2018,

and will further our commitment to animal care, education, and conservation with a focus on this state’s remarkable native wildlife. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information, go to: www.oaklandzoo.org

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(Photo Credit: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren/Woodland Park Zoo)

Oakland, CA …July 8, 2016 – Three adolescent Southeast African lions are adjusting well to their new home at

Oakland Zoo after a mandatory 30-day quarantine at Oakland Zoo’s vet hospital and transition from holding areas.  The eighteen month-old lions are brothers, making up a ‘coalition’, meaning an all-male social group, that are rarely seen in AZA accredited U.S. Zoos.

 

The move was based on a recommendation made by the Species Survival Plan (SSP), a conservation-breeding program across accredited zoos to increase the genetic diversity and enhance the health of species populations. Named Tandie, Mandla and Gandia, the trio is now the juvenile neighbor to Oakland Zoo’s resident lion, Leonard, a senior at 16 years old. There are no plans to integrate Leonard and the coalition, as coalitions are known to fight fiercely with male lions unknown to them. Young male lions commonly form bachelor groups in the wild while developing skills to form their own prides later in life.

The lion brothers were transported by plane from Seattle on May 25th with the generous support of the employees at the local Merrill Lynch Wealth Management offices in Oakland and Walnut Creek. Hearing about the Zoo’s efforts to bring the lions over, they raised $7,500 through bake sales and other donation efforts  that was matched by Bank of America for a total of $15,000 to cover flight costs.

 

“Lion coalitions are often seen in the wild, but rarely in zoos; so most people find this normal aspect of lion sociality peculiar! We are excited for guests to see the three brothers lounging and interacting with each other, and to learn about the threats facing African lions. We are one of a few zoos chosen to work with Southeast African lions, and though there are no future plans for females or a breeding program, we have a very important story to tell!,” Darren Minier, Zoological Manager at Oakland Zoo.

With Oakland and Woodland Park Zoo’s strong dedication to animal welfare, the three lions were successfully crated at Woodland Park, transported to Oakland Zoo, quarantined, then re-crated and transferred to the Simba Pori exhibit using only voluntary, positive reinforcement training – no anesthesia, tranquilizers, or force was used at any time in the 12 week process. This aided in the least amount of stress possible for the lions at all points in the process, and was only possible through the skill of dedicated, knowledgeable, and caring keeper staff.

Southeast African lions are one on the remaining eight species of lion. It’s estimated that only 30,000 to 35,000 lions remain in the wild – a decrease of 30% in the past twenty years. Threats include hunting, human-wildlife conflict, human encroachment resulting in habitat loss, and prey-base depletion. Oakland Zoo supports lions in the wild through our conservation partner, the Uganda Carnivore Program. Visit Oakland Zoo on World Lion Day, August 6, to celebrate lions, learn more about the conservation challenges they face and the wild, and what you can do to help.

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO

The Bay Area's award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid's activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to the humane treatment of animals and wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide; with 25¢ from each ticket donated to support conservation partners and programs around the world. The California Trail, a transformational project that more than doubles our size, opens in 2018, and will further our commitment to animal care, education, and conservation with a focus on this state’s remarkable native wildlife. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information, go to: www.oaklandzoo.org

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MIAMI, FLA. - JUNE 30, 2016 - The Zoological Wildlife Foundation (ZWF Miami) is delighted to announce the arrival of a beautiful, new female Jaguar cub, that has been named 'Sapphire' by ZWF's founders in honor of the cub's deep blue eyes.
 
"We are overjoyed by the arrival of Sapphire and are excited to watch her grow and thrive within the ZWF environment," said Mario Tabraue, President and Director of ZWF Miami. "Our goal is to provide all our animals with exceptional care and a safe living environment," added Maria Tabraue, Vice President and Director of the zoo.
 
The largest cats in the Americas, jaguars reside in parts of Arizona, California and New Mexico as well as in the rainforests of Central and South America. With approximately 15,000 of the cats left in the world, they are considered a threatened species. 
 
Born on May 5, 2016, Sapphire is now eight weeks old and currently available for encounters with visitors of ZWF. Guests will have a chance to meet the cub for a limited time as an add-on to a tour experience at $160 + tax for adults and $60 + tax for children. To ensure the wellbeing of the cub, the duration of each encounter is limited to 5 minutes.
 
To learn more about how you can schedule a visit to meet Sapphire as well as ZWF Miami's other resident animals, visit: www.zwfmiami.com.
ZWF Miami is located at 16225 SW 172 Avenue in Miami, Florida and is open to the public seven days a week. Tours of the park are available by appointment only. Call (305) 969-3696 for more information.
Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, for more exciting news and updates.
 
About the Zoological Wildlife Foundation:
Founded in 2001, the Zoological Wildlife Foundation (ZWF Miami) is an organization accredited by the Zoological Association of America that serves as a zoo and a conservation facility that is dedicated to educating the public about rare and endangered animal species in captivity and in the wild. Located south of Miami and spanning several breathtaking acres of land, ZWF Miami is home to everything from domestic animals, leopards, big cats primates, large predatory birds and mammals to dozens of exotic species, most of which are available for interactive encounters with the public.

 

Network puts animals, the show’s cast, and crew at risk; ignores requests to consider humane alternatives

“We know the television industry is better than this and would never want a tragedy to occur.” – Born Free USA CEO

Washington, D.C., June 29, 2016 -- Born Free USA, a global leader in wildlife conservation and animal welfare, condemns the CBS Television Network for its use of live exotic animals in the series Zoo. The second season, which premiered last night, reportedly continues to use big cats, wolves, reindeer, horses, and buffalo in filming. The exploitative use of wildlife for entertainment is not only cruel to animals, but also extremely dangerous to the cast and crew working with them. Furthermore, using live wildlife for television and film is outdated in the age of computer-generated special effects, as recently illustrated in the feature film The Jungle Book, which seamlessly uses technology to bring wild animals to “life.”

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, “We spoke to executives at CBS last year and were told that, if the show got picked up, a conversation or meeting would take place to discuss Born Free USA’s legitimate animal welfare concerns. We never heard back and further attempts to speak with them have gone unanswered. It is clear that no progress has been made in phasing out live animals. Zoo can certainly adopt modern technology in place of outdated practices that significantly impact animal welfare and public safety. We know the television industry is better than this and would never want a tragedy to occur.”

Wild animal “actors,” such as the ones used in Zoo, spend their lives in captivity experiencing severe physical and psychological suffering. Training methods for animal actors have been known to include coercion and negative reinforcement: a process which may involve withholding food or using physical force.

Moreover, many of the animals used in Zoo have long lifespans. Lions can live 10-15 years, sometimes longer; bears live for approximately 20-25 years. Often, when animal actors are no longer deemed useful, or they become too dangerous to be used in media, they are sent to already-overburdened sanctuaries or deplorable roadside zoos.

In addition, the use of exotic animals places actors and crew in highly dangerous situations. No matter how “well trained” and “trusted” the animals are, repeated incidents recorded in Born Free USA’s Exotic Animal Incidents Database demonstrate that such animals inevitably display their natural, wild behaviors, which can lead to injury or even death to humans. 

Roberts continues, “Wild animals are wild, and do not belong imprisoned in a trailer or exploited on a television or film set. These animals are not props, and forcing them to perform for our entertainment is neither humane nor safe—particularly when technological innovations can so easily be substituted. Given CBS’s stated plans to run the series for five seasons, we strongly encourage the network to ensure that only CGI technology is used in the future.”

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic "pets," trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to America the message of "compassionate conservation": the vision of the U.K.-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free's mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

TPR News
Saturday, June 18, the 170th day of 2016. There are 196 days left in the year.CREW
Jon Patch - Host
Jillyn Sidlo - Co Host
Lexi Lapp - Producer
Ben Boquist - Network Producer
Bob Page - Executive Producer
Special Guests - Zak George author of "Dog Training Revolution" will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 6/18/16 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away his new book
Kristina Guerrero CEO of TurboPUP will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 6/18/16 at 620pm EST to discuss and give away her snack bars for dogs
Dave Merrick President of Neutricks will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 6/18/16 at 720pm EST to discuss and give away Neutricks for dogs and cats------------------

 

Oakland, CA…May 10, 2016 – Seven little piggies- that is, baby warthogs- are now on exhibit at Oakland Zoo. Almost three years ago, female warthogs Frenchie and Alice were brought to Oakland Zoo in hopes of a ‘love connection’ with Simon – the Zoo’s resident male. It took a little while but Simon has proven himself quite a catch – Alice and Frenchie have both given birth to litters exactly one week apart.

Frenchie birthed the first litter of three on May 6, and days later the second litter of four piglets was born to Alice on May 13 – both sows are also first-time moms. Zookeepers have been readying for the piglets’ arrival for months, via closed circuit cameras in the animals’ night house dens and continue to monitor the maternal care and the developmental milestones of the piglets.

“We are thrilled to have two litters of healthy piglets! Both sows, "Frenchie" and "Alice" are first time moms, and are doing a wonderful job and being very protective. All seven piglets are just now beginning to explore their surroundings under the watchful eyes of their moms and keepers,” Lovesong Cahill, Senior Zookeeper.

Zookeepers worked very hard preparing for the births by making changes to the warthogs’ night houses and exhibit; including modifying denning boxes to receive central heating, piglet-proofing gates and other areas the piglets will have access to, and monitoring the pregnancy progress through positive-reinforcement training. This training resulted in one of the mothers allowing ultrasound imaging of her piglets in utero.

Over the next couple months, both litters will have access to the exhibit, but may or may not be visible depending on their preference to come out or stay in the warthogs' night house. 

Warthogs typically birth two to three piglets complete with tusks to jockey for the best nursing position. The piglets, covered in a sparse coarse fur, are quite mobile soon after birth, but remain in the den for 10-20 days. They will wean from the sow at about three months old. Both sexes are born with the characteristic ‘mutton chops’, but males are easily determined by ‘warts’ that are visible at birth. Both sexes eventually develop ‘warts’, but boars display the most obvious protuberances of thick fleshy pads below their eyes and above their tusks, which protect their face when competing for females. None of the piglets have been sexed yet as Zookeepers are keeping their distance to allow the dams and piglets their privacy.

“Whenever animals breed at the Zoo, we plan not just for the health of the newborns and a great start to their life, but we also work with our animal expert colleagues at AZA accredited zoos across the country to plan for the often arduous task of social introductions,” said Darren Minier, Zoological Manager at Oakland Zoo.

The decision to breed our warthogs is based on a rigorous process with other AZA (Association of Zoos and Aquariums) accredited Zoos, through a program called the SSP (Species Survival Plan), which tracks the genetics of individual animals, the social, environmental and health needs of each, and the overall needs of the population in zoos. The goal is to assure the best in welfare for each animal and the population as a whole. 

 

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ABOUT WARTHOGS: Warthogs have been known to live into their mid to late teens in captivity. They are found in sub-Sahara Africa, in the grassland and savannah habitats. Typically, these animals are seen eating, sleeping, and wallowing in the mud. They will rest frequently during the afternoon hours. Warthogs are in the pig family and can make the grunting and squealing sounds associated with that type of animal. When greeting one another through the fence or on exhibit, they make what is described by zookeepers as a low repetitious grunt. Gestation period is approximately 170 days.  Sows typically birth two-four piglets, each weighing about 6 pounds. Piglets will nurse up to four months of age, and become independent at six months.

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area's award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid's activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to the humane treatment of animals and wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide; with 25¢ from each ticket donated to support conservation partners and programs around the world. The California Trail, a transformational project that more than doubles our size, opens in 2018, and will further our commitment to animal care, education, and conservation with a focus on this state’s remarkable native wildlife. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information, go to: www.oaklandzoo.org

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