Displaying items by tag: winners


New York, N.Y. – The American Kennel Club (AKC®), the world's largest purebred dog registry and leading advocate for dogs, is pleased to announce the winners of the first ever AKC Agility Premier Cup Presented by EEM which was held in conjunction with the Longines Masters of New York at NYCB Live at the newly renovated Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on April 25th.
“It was thrilling to watch some of the nation’s top dogs compete at the inaugural AKC Agility Cup Presented by EEM,” said Doug Ljungren, AKC Executive Vice President of Sports and Events. “These dogs were invited based on criteria that recognizes excellence in AKC’s Agility program and it was a pleasure to honor these incredible performances as the winners were crowned.”
This family-friendly event marked the first time AKC Agility was held at an Equestrian event, demonstrating the amazing abilities of both horses and dogs in their respective sports. The top 60 canine agility competitors and their handlers from around the country were invited to compete at the Invitational.
A total of twelve dogs were entered at each jump height (8”,12”, 16”, 20”, and 24”) competing for $10,000 in cash prizes. The first-place winners in each jump height received $1,500 and will
have their names engraved on the AKC Agility Premier Cup trophy that will be displayed in perpetuity in the AKC New York Headquarters. Second-place winners in each jump height received $500 each.
The AKC Agility Cup Presented by EEM Winners:
First place winner and runner-up in each height division (8", 12", 16", 20" and 24” respectively):
8” First Place: A Papillon known as “Wren,” handled by Betsey Lynch of Delaware, OH.
8” Second Place: An All-American Dog known as “Logan,” handled by Kim Barton of Johnstown, OH.
12” First Place: A Miniature American Shepherd known as “Pixel,” handled by Ami Sheffield of Omaha, NE.
12” Second Place: A Poodle known as “Bliss,” handled by Cassie Schmidt of Lees Summit, MO.
16” First Place: A Border Collie known as “P!nk,” handled by Jennifer Crank of Pickerington, OH.
16” Second Place: An Australian Cattle Dog known as “Skoal,” handled by Martine Kopka of Rosenberg, TX.
20” First Place: A Border Collie known as “Graphite,” handled by Paulena Simpson of Berkeley Springs, WV.
20” Second Place: An Australian Shepherd known as “Holster,” handled by Wendy Cerilli of Greenwich, NY.
24” First Place: An All-American Dog known as “Harley,” handled by Erin Stumler of Floyds Knobs, IN.
24” Second Place: A Belgian Malinois known as “Luna,” handled by Shane Miller of Moline, IL.
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About the American Kennel Club
Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function. Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog. For more information, visit www.akc.org.
AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.
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New York, NY-The American Kennel Club® (AKC) is proud to announce the winners of the 2017 AKC® Lifetime Achievement Awards: Patricia W. Laurans (Conformation), Elizabeth (Tibby) Chase (Companion Events) and Jim Campbell (Performance).

The Awards, created by AKC President Dennis Sprung, are presented in recognition of exceptional participation and achievement within the dog fancy. The finalists and winners, based on nominations from AKC member clubs, have impacted the dog sport on a national level through club involvement, judging, exhibiting, breeding and teaching.

 

Conformation

Patricia W. Laurans, of Newtown, Connecticut, has been active in dogs for over 50 years as an exhibitor, all-breed handler and breeder of Best in Show, National Specialty winning and top producing German Wirehaired Pointers.

She has served as Delegate for the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America for over 30 years. During that time she was elected to the AKC Board of Directors and started an AKC Breeders Education program and helped establish the Junior Scholarship program.

When Pat left the Board of Directors in 2000 she was elected to the Parent Club Committee and has served as its Chairperson from 2000 to the present. During this tenure she helped establish the Parent Club Conference Program and chaired three National Parent Club Conferences. In 2013 she helped establish the AKC Reunite Pet Disaster Trailer Program and serves as its co-chairman.  Read more

Companion Events

Elizabeth (Tibby) Chase, of Monson, Massachusetts, desperately wanted a Welsh pony as a child, but her sensible parents presented her with a Pembroke Welsh Corgi. This little dog introduced Tibby to the challenging world of dog training and was her first high in trial dog in 1961. She has been involved with dogs, dog training and Corgis ever since.

While obedience is her first love, Tibby has successfully trained and shown dogs in rally, tracking, agility, herding, and conformation. One ‘special’ Pembroke, “Tyler”, Ch. Heronsway Free Style UDT ROMX, is one of a few obedience titled dogs to win the breed at Westminster. In very limited breeding, Tibby produced several Pembroke champions and others that excelled in obedience, herding and agility. Read more

Performance

Jim Campbell, of Marrero, Louisiana, grew up in in rural Mississippi in the 1950’s and 60’s. Rabbit hunting with grade beagles instilled in him a love for the sport. In 1978 he got his first AKC registered beagles. After moving to New Orleans he met Maurice Ellis, Rannie Ladner and Tommy Moffet. Jim gives credit to them for teaching him what to look for in a hound and how to condition them. His first good dog was Jazztown T-Beau, who had a great nose, outstanding line control and check work that set the standard for what he looks for in a dog to this day.

Jim has bred many worthy hounds over the years, seven of which finished as AKC field champions. He finished four field champions himself, two of which went on to win the AKC SPO Nationals. FC JO's Hustler won the Southern States Championship twice. FC Huff's Riverland Charter won the SPO Nationals in 2007, and to date has produced six field champions. Jim also owned Tommy's Talking Deacon and Blue Ann. The latest field champion that he finished is FC JO's Shaq. Read More

The honorees, who were selected from votes cast by AKC member clubs, will receive engraved Revere bowls on Friday, December 16, 2016 at the Delegates luncheon held in conjunction with the AKC National Championship presented by Royal Canin in Orlando, Florida. A sterling silver Tiffany and Co. bowl, engraved with the names of all recipients past and present, is on permanent display at AKC headquarters in New York City.

For more information on the recipients, go to http://www.akc.org/about/awards-and-honors/lifetime-achievement/recipients/2017/

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (June 16, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, announces the first round of new grants awarded through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative.

Jason Stull, VMD, PhD, of The Ohio State University will study “Lyme Disease in Dogs: Prevalence, Clinical Illness, and Prognosis.” Lyme disease is a bacterial disease transmitted by tick bites. In people, Lyme is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the US, with over 25,000 cases in 2014. Dogs infected with Lyme disease may not show signs of illness, but underlying impact can be severe. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Lyme disease in dogs is complicated by limited research and conflicting professional guidance. Following a large group of dogs from different regions of the United States and Canada, the investigators will broaden the understanding of canine Lyme disease by identifying and defining best practices for prevention and control of Lyme disease in areas with different Lyme risks, ultimately improving the health of dogs and their people.

Linda Kidd, DVM, PhD, Western University of Health Sciences, and her team will study “Thrombocytopenia and Occult Vector-Borne Disease in Greyhound Dogs: Implications for Clinical Cases and Blood Donors.” Retired racing Greyhounds are common blood donors for dogs requiring blood transfusions. Low platelet (thrombocytopenia) and white blood cell counts are considered normal findings in Greyhounds, as is protein in their urine. Because vector-borne disease pathogens can cause chronic, clinically silent infection, the researchers hypothesize that infection occurs in, and contributes to blood and urine abnormalities in some healthy-appearing retired racing Greyhounds. This study will compare the prevalence of vector-borne diseases in retired racing Greyhounds and show-bred Greyhounds, and will investigate whether blood and urine abnormalities occur with the same frequency in these two lines of Greyhounds. The results will help veterinarians decide when to pursue infectious disease testing, while also informing best practices for screening canine blood donors.

Mary Anna Thrall, DVM, MS of Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine and her team will investigate “The Role of Lymphocytes in Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis (CME),” an important tick-borne disease in dogs caused by the pathogen, Ehrlichia canis. In an effort to understand the variable severity of the disease amongst dogs, the team will study the role and types of lymphocytes present in Ehrlichia-positive dogs to determine if increased lymphocyte counts and a large number of genetically identical lymphocytes are associated with disease severity. The findings from this study will help advance the understanding of the pathophysiology and accurate diagnosis of canine ehrlichiosis and lymphocytosis.

“This first round of funding through the AKC Canine Health Foundation’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative shows promising research to address important tick-borne diseases affecting dogs,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF chief executive officer. “We are excited about the impact this Initiative will have on canine health and owner awareness of the growing concern over important tick-borne pathogens.”

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs, and individuals who are committed to the betterment of canine health through scientific research. During 2016, all donations to the Tick-Borne Disease Initiative are being matched dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club (up to $250,000). Make an impact and double your donation today: www.akcchf.org/ticks.  

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 Blue Ridge Humane Society Announces Winning Entry in  

“Give Us Your Best Shot” Pet Photo Contest

             HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. –The non-profit Blue Ridge Humane Society has named the first and second place winners in their “Give Us Your Best Shot” pet photo contest. The black and white entry featuring the close-up of a golden retriever lying on a deck received the thumbs up from judge Michele Stephenson, former director of photography for TIME Magazine. The picture of Zema, a four-year old Golden Retriever lying on an outside deck that captured the first place winning photo was submitted by Dr. Arthur Pearsall of Hendersonville, N.C.

             “This picture of my son’s dog was taken on his deck in Chesapeake Beach, Maryland just a few months ago,” says Pearsall, who most of his pictures in black and white. “Goldens have very expressive eyes and Zema was the perfect subject.” 

            At home, Pearsall has his own rescue dog, Jake, a Border Collie/Lab mix adopted locally almost eight years ago. A dentist by profession, Pearsall has been involved in photography for more than 30 years.

             “There were so many wonderful portraits of people’s pets to choose from in this contest,” says Stephenson, who came to Hendersonville to judge the contest in conjunction with the organization’s Wags to Riches event. “It was difficult to choose just two winners, but this one picture of the dog on the deck had everything … an immediate connection with the dog along with wonderful texture and composition.”

             The second place winner features an image of a six-month old black lab puppy running at the camera. Submitted by Dave Baker of Mills River, the picture depicts his dog Emily taken in his backyard. The “in flight” action shot was taken as Baker and his wife taught Emily her name by having her race back and forth between them for treats.

             “The second place winning picture spoke to me of the wonderful spirit of the dog,” says Stephenson. “The picture had excellent technical qualities and a sense of energy.”

             The contest, which ran from September 1 to October 14, 2011, had almost 100 entries.  The winners will have their photographs permanently showcased at the Blue Ridge Humane Society shelter location in Edneyville and its thrift shop location in Hendersonville. A local artist will create custom note cards featuring the winning entries and the images will be portrayed on the organization’s web site.

             The Blue Ridge Humane Society, established in 1950 is a limited admission nonprofit 501(c)3 animal welfare organization committed to quality shelter care, treatment of our charges, and to advocacy for spaying/neutering throughout Henderson County. For more details, visit www.blueridgehumane.org.

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