Displaying items by tag: science

PIERCE BROSNAN TO HOST 7TH ANNUAL 
“BREAKTHROUGH PRIZE” CEREMONY ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4 
LIVE ON NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
 
The Annual, Star-Studded Ceremony that Celebrates
Science and Scientific Achievement 

To Feature an “In Memoriam” Tribute to the Late Stephen Hawking
 
Ceremony to Air Live at 10p ET/7p PT 

 
SAN FRANCISCO– October 16, 2018–The Breakthrough Prize today announced that acclaimed actor, producer and philanthropist Pierce Brosnan will host its 7thannual ceremony, which will celebrate science and the achievements of the 2019 Breakthrough Prize laureates on Sunday, November 4, at a live ceremony at the NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley. 
 
The ceremony will be broadcast live at 10pm ET/7pm PT on National Geographic, and be streamed live on the Facebook and YouTube platforms of National Geographic (FacebookYouTube) and Breakthrough Prize (FacebookYouTube).
 
Hosted by Brosnan, the program will include a tribute to the late, renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, who died in March 2018. 
 
Details of the evening’s musical performance and celebrity presenters will be announced at a later date. The show will be directed and produced, for the sixth time, by Don Mischer, alongside executive producers Charlie Haykel and Juliane Hare of Don Mischer Productions.
 
Now in its seventh year, Silicon Valley’s Breakthrough Prize – the world’s most generous science prize – honors paradigm-shifting research and discovery in the fields of fundamental physics, life sciences and mathematics. This year, a total of seven $3 million prizes will be awarded – four in life sciences, two in fundamental physics, and one in mathematics. One of the two physics prizes - the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics – was awarded in September to the British astrophysicist Jocelyn Bell Burnell for her discovery of pulsars – a detection first announced in February 1968 – and her inspiring scientific leadership over the last five decades. 
 
The Breakthrough Prizes are sponsored by Sergey Brin, Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg, Ma Huateng, Yuri and Julia Milner, and Anne Wojcicki. Selection Committees composed of previous Breakthrough Prize laureates in each field choose the winners.
 
Breakthrough Prize
For the seventh year, the Breakthrough Prizes will recognize the world’s top scientists. Each prize is $3 million and presented in the fields of Life Sciences (up to four per year), Fundamental Physics (one per year) and Mathematics (one per year). In addition, up to three New Horizons in Physics and up to three New Horizons in Mathematics Prizes are given out to junior researchers each year. Laureates attend a live televised award ceremony designed to celebrate their achievements and inspire the next generation of scientists. As part of the ceremony schedule, they also engage in a program of lectures and discussions. 
 
Information on the Breakthrough Prizes is available at www.breakthroughprize.org.
 
About National Geographic
National Geographic Partners LLC (NGP), a joint venture between National Geographic and 21st Century Fox, is committed to bringing the world premium science, adventure and exploration content across an unrivaled portfolio of media assets. NGP combines the global National Geographic television channels (National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo MUNDO, Nat Geo PEOPLE) with National Geographic’s media and consumer-oriented assets, including National Geographic magazines; National Geographic studios; related digital and social media platforms; books; maps; children’s media; and ancillary activities that include travel, global experiences and events, archival sales, licensing and e-commerce businesses. Furthering knowledge and understanding of our world has been the core purpose of National Geographic for 130 years, and now we are committed to going deeper, pushing boundaries, going further for our consumers … and reaching millions of people around the world in 172 countries and 43 languages every month as we do it. NGP returns 27 percent of our proceeds to the nonprofit National Geographic Society to fund work in the areas of science, exploration, conservation and education. For more information visit natgeotv.com or nationalgeographic.com, or find us on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTubeLinkedIn and Pinterest.
 
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Review written by Jon Patch with 2.5 out of 4 paws

Annihilation

Paramount Pictures, Skydance, DNA Films and Scott Rudin Productions present an R rated, 115 minute, Adventure, Drama, Fantasy, directed and written by Alex Garland, based on the novel by Jeff VanderMeer with a theatre release date of February 23, 2018.

“A timely tale of science and suspense.”*

AMERICAN ECLIPSE

A Nation’s Epic Race to Catch the Shadow of the Moon and Win the Glory of the World

David Baron

“Baron skillfully builds tension, giving readers a vivid sense of the excitement, hard work, and high stakes in play. With the first total solar eclipse to cross the U.S. in 99 years set to occur in late August 2017, this engrossing story makes an entertaining and informative teaser.”

éPublishers Weekly (starred review)*

 “Baron brilliantly presents these three pioneers, their ambitions, and their struggles. As America again prepares to experience solar totality, Baron transports us to a remarkable moment that brought a nation together to witness the wonders of the heavens.”

éBooklist (starred review)

“Captivating....As Baron capably and enthusiastically shows, the solar eclipse of 1878 proved to be an important moment in the emergence of American science.”

Kirkus Reviews

“Throughout, the book depicts the United States as a young country striving to achieve parity with Europe on the intellectual stage…Baron tells a compelling tale.”

Library Journal

To understand eclipse chasers, it helps to be one. In AMERICAN ECLIPSE, David Baron—umbraphile[1] extraordinaire and an acclaimed science writer—travels back in time to profile three outsized personalities hell-bent on making their names at the dawn of American astronomy. The result is a gripping and entertaining account of the frontiers of science set on the literal frontier, and it comes just in time for the first total solar eclipse to traverse the entire continental U.S. in 99 years.

While we await that momentous event (on August 21; an experience that will awe tens of millions of Americans), David Baron gives us the gripping tale of a solar eclipse 140 years ago that inspired the country like never before. On a July afternoon in 1878, at the start of the Gilded Age and the height of the Wild West, the moon’s shadow descended on the American frontier, darkening skies from Montana Territory to Texas. This eclipse, which had been predicted by astronomers, lured many of the era’s great scientists to the West in an era of train robberies and Indian hostilities.

Among them were a young Thomas Edison, who hoped to leverage the eclipse to burnish his scientific credentials; the vainglorious James Craig Watson, who sought professional bragging rights for new planets and asteroids; and Vassar astronomer Maria Mitchell, who aimed to use the event to show what women could do in science. An untold tale of ambition, failure, and eventual triumph, the book brings to life the intellectual and technological flowering of late-nineteenth-century America, a period that laid the foundation for the country’s eventual rise to scientific greatness.

AMERICAN ECLIPSE is the perfect antidote for a cynical and divided nation; proof of how we can still marvel at a natural spectacle that elevates us beyond our workaday lives, and how Americans can rally around a moment—and will, this August 21—to ponder our collective place in the cosmos.

AUTHOR TOUR: New York (June 2-3); Washington DC (June 4-6); Boston (June 8-10); New Jersey (June 11-12); Atlanta (June 13-14); Philadelphia (June 15); St. Louis (June 16-17); Kansas City (June 20); Boulder (June 29); Denver (July 12 and 24); Colorado Springs (July 13); Portland, OR (July 18); Seattle (July 19)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

David Baron, an award-winning journalist, is a former science correspondent for NPR and former science editor for the public radio program The World. An incurable umbraphile whose passion for chasing eclipses began in 1998, he lives in Boulder, Colorado.

Author website at www.american-eclipse.com.

TITLE: AMERICAN ECLIPSE: A Nation’s Epic Race to Catch the Shadow of the Moon and Win the Glory of the World

AUTHOR: David Baron

PUBLICATION DATE: June 6, 2017

PAGES: 352              PRICE: $27.95          ISBN: 978-1-63149-016-3

 

Review written by Jon Patch with 3.5 out of 4 paws

Life

Columbia Pictures, Skydance Media and Sony Pictures Entertainment present an R Rated, 103 minute, Horror, Sci-Fi, Thriller, directed by Daniel Espinosa, written by Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick with a theater release date of March 24, 2017.

ITHACA—Researchers from Cornell University and the Smithsonian Institution have solved the decades-long puzzle of canine in vitro fertilization (IVF), resulting in the world’s first litter of IVF puppies.

The breakthrough, described in a study published online Dec. 9 in the journal Public Library of Science ONE, opens the door for preserving endangered canid species using assisted reproduction techniques. It could also enable researchers to eradicate heritable diseases in dogs and facilitate the study of genetic diseases in dogs and humans, which share many of the same or similar illnesses.

Researchers at the Cornell laboratory transferred 19 embryos to a host female dog, who gave birth last spring to seven healthy puppies. Genetic testing shows that two are from a beagle mother and a cocker spaniel father, and five from two pairings of beagle fathers and mothers.

“Since the mid-1970s, people have been trying to do [IVF] in a dog and have been unsuccessful,” said co-author Alex Travis, associate professor of reproductive biology at the Baker Institute for Animal Health in Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

The paper’s first author, Jennifer Nagashima, was a graduate student whose participation in the project was funded by the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) and Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future. The National Institutes of Health and the Baker Institute provided funding for the project itself.

Laboratories perform successful IVF with other mammals—including humans—by retrieving mature eggs and sperm and combining them in an artificial environment to produce embryos. The embryos are transferred to a host female at the right time in her reproductive cycle.

Past attempts at canine IVF failed because a female dog’s reproductive cycle differs from that of other mammals. Canine eggs retrieved at the same stage of cell maturation as other animals failed to fertilize. By applying the oocyte biology expertise of SCBI’s Nucharin Songsasen, a research biologist and co-author, the team found that if they left the egg in the oviduct one extra day, the eggs reached the stage where fertilization was most likely to occur.

In addition, the female canine tract plays a role in preparing sperm for fertilization, so researchers had to simulate those conditions in the lab. Building on Travis’s earlier work on sperm physiology, the team found that sperm could be artificially prepared by adding magnesium to the cell culture.

“We made those two changes, and now we achieve success in fertilization rates at 80 to 90 percent,” Travis said.

The final challenge arises because female dogs can only become pregnant once or twice a year. This means embryos must be created ahead of time and preserved until the host female is at the right point in her cycle. The team solved this problem by using the technique, developed by Travis’s lab in partnership with SCBI, which produced Klondike, the first puppy born from a frozen embryo in the Western Hemisphere.

The birth of IVF puppies has wide implications for wildlife conservation. “We can freeze and bank sperm, and use it for artificial insemination,” Travis said. “We can also freeze oocytes, but in the absence of in vitro fertilization, we couldn’t use them. Now we can use this technique to conserve the genetics of endangered species.” The method can also be used to preserve rare breeds of show and working dogs.

In addition, embryonic dogs now offer a “powerful tool for understanding the genetic basis of diseases” in canines and humans, Travis said. Dogs share more than 350 similar heritable disorders and traits with humans, almost twice the number as any other species.

A successful IVF process for canines may one day enable researchers to remove genetic diseases and traits in an embryo, ridding dogs of heritable diseases such as lymphoma, a cancer that is more prevalent in breeds like Golden Retrievers. “With a combination of gene editing techniques and IVF, we can potentially prevent genetic disease before it starts,” Travis said.

Friend,

Greetings from the Nonhuman Rights Project! As August draws to a close, we have a number of important updates we'd like to share with you.

First, regarding Hercules and Leo: as you may know, Stony Brook University indicated at the end of July that it would no longer experiment on our chimpanzee plaintiffs—this is great news, especially because they're still young and have much of their lives still before them.

That said, where Hercules and Leo will go next remains to be seen. To help ensure that they're transferred to Save the Chimps or an appropriate member sanctuary of the North American Primate Sanctuary Alliance (NAPSA), our legal team is deep in negotiations with Stony Brook and with Hercules' and Leo's "owner," the New Iberia Research Center. We've made clear that if Stony Brook attempts to move Hercules and Leo to any place other than one of the aforementioned sanctuaries, we'll immediately seek a preliminary injunction to prevent this move pending the outcome of all appeals (as we succeeded in doing in Tommy's case last year).

Meanwhile, we're preparing our appeal of Justice Jaffe's recent decision in Hercules and Leo's case; we encourage you to read NhRP President Steven M. Wise's in-depth analysis of the decision on our website. We continue to wait for decisions in Tommy's and Kiko's cases.

In other NhRP news:

  • The NhRP was honored to again be part of this year's Animal Rights National Conference in Washington, D.C. As Executive Director of the NhRP, I spoke on two different panels, including the Friday Evening Plenary where I discussed how I came to be involved with the NhRP and what it means to work toward justice for Tommy, Kiko, Hercules, Leo, and other nonhuman animals. Thank you to all who attended either in person or via Twitter!
  • Please join us in congratulating our latest Featured Volunteer, Jo Frederiks. Jo is a visual artist who has generously contributed numerous sketches of nonhuman animals for use in the NhRP's social-media infographics. Read more about Jo here.
  • Steve just wrapped up teaching "Animal Rights Law and Jurisprudence" at Lewis and Clark Law School. Steve tells me that, as usual, the exceedingly bright, engaged students made the course a rich and intellectually exciting experience. We hope you can join Steve next time the course is offered!
  • Steve was the inaugural guest for Our Hen House's new Animal Law Podcast. Listen to his interview here and his follow-up interview (following Justice Jaffe's decision) here.
  • Are you an attorney with significant civil trial and appellate experience? The NhRP is hiring! Please see our job advertisement for more information.
That's all from us for now! Please stay tuned for some exciting NhRP developments in store for the second half of 2015. We remain deeply appreciative of your passionate investment in the outcome of our lawsuits, and we'll be sure to keep you updated on what's going on.

From the entire NhRP team: thank you!

Natalie Prosin
Executive Director
The Nonhuman Rights Project

About the Nonhuman Rights Project

The Nonhuman Rights Project is the only civil rights organization in the United States working to achieve actual LEGAL rights for members of species other than our own. Our mission is to change the legal status of appropriate nonhuman animals from mere "things," which lack the capacity to possess any legal right, to "persons," who possess such fundamental rights as bodily integrity and bodily liberty. Our first cases were filed in 2013 on behalf of captive chimpanzees; we plan to continue to file as many lawsuits as we have funds available. Your support of this work is deeply appreciated!

Talkin Pets Radio Show NewsCrew:Jon Patch - HostDr. Anne Lampru - Vet/Co HostLexi Lapp - ProducerZach Buden - Network ProducerBob Page - Executive ProducerSpecial Guests:
New book explores humans' interactions with urban animals and demonstrates how cities are more full of life than we think - Author Tristan Donovan joins Jon and Talkin' Pets 3/28/15 at 5 PM EST to discuss and give away his bookFounder Julianna Carella of Auntie Dolores and The Every Day Edible will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 3/28/15 at 6:30 PM EST to discuss and give away her Cannabis and Hemp products Treat-iblesJolene Roxbury at 7:35 PM EST of The Jolene Roxbury Variety Hour and her rendition of Gold Linger

Dr Mark Post aims to prove that growing meat in labs could reduce the impact of livestock production on the environment

Over the weekend, scientists at Dr Mark Post's laboratory in Maastricht University made their final preparations for an event they hope will change the way we see food. On Monday, Dr Post will cook the world's most expensive hamburger, made from meat grown in Petri dishes in his lab.

Starting with stem cells extracted from a biopsy of a cow, Post's team grew 20,000 muscle fibres over the course of three months. Each tiny, hoop-like fibre grew in an individual culture well, suspended in a gel-like growth medium.

When they were ready, the fibres were removed individually by hand, cut open and straightened out. All the fibres were pressed together to form the hamburger – biologically identical to beef but grown in a lab rather than in a field as part of a cow. The total cost so far of the project has been €250,000.

In London on Monday afternoon Post plans to eat the hamburger in front of reporters and anyone else in the world who wants to take a look, via a livestream of the event on the internet. His aim is simple: to show the world that growing real, edible meat in laboratories is no longer a fantasy and that this could be a potential solution to the worsening impact of meat production on our environment.

"Cows are very inefficient, they require 100g of vegetable protein to produce only 15g of edible animal protein," Post told the Guardian. "So we need to feed the cows a lot so that we can feed ourselves. We lose a lot of food that way. [With cultured meat] we can make it more efficient because we have all the variables under control. We don't need to kill the cow and it doesn't [produce] any methane."

The human appetite for meat means that 30% of the Earth's useable surface is covered by pasture land for animals, compared with just 4% of the surface used directly to feed humans. The total biomass of our livestock is almost double that of the people on the planet and accounts for 5% of carbon dioxide emissions and 40% of methane emissions – a much more potent greenhouse gas.

By 2060, human population is predicted to have risen to 9.5 billion and, with a rising demand for meat from rapidly developing populations in, for example, China and India, the market in meat is expected to double by the middle of the century. If the amount of meat we produce doubles, livestock could be responsible for half as much climate impact as all the world's cars, lorries and airplanes. In 2008, Dr Rajendra Pachauri, chair of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, urged people to have one meat-free day a week to help curb the rate of global climate change.

Dr Post said that his cultured beef was still undergoing a lifecycle analysis to work out its overall environmental impacts, but early indications were that his lab meat reduced the need for land and water by 90% and overall energy use was cut by 70%.

Though Post's work is at its earliest stages – there are many hurdles before he can scale up the process for large-scale manufacture – he has high hopes for his product. "Twenty years from now if you have a choice in the supermarket between two products that are identical and they taste and feel the same and have the same price – and one is made in an environmentally friendly way with much less resources and provides food security for the population and doesn't have any animal welfare connotations to it – the choice will be relatively easy," he said. "People will start to prefer this type of product and then it will gradually transform meat production."

The hamburger he has made so far is relatively simple, just pure protein. It might be good enough as a proof of concept but it is far from being a seamless replacement for meat. For a start, it has no fat or blood, which is where much of the distinctive flavour of meat comes from.

Next on the agenda, therefore, for Post's team is to add lab-grown fat cells to the protein, perhaps even bone cells for those who want a fully lab-cultured T-bone steak. "The technology now is confined to small pieces because you have to get oxygen and nutrients into the tissue to keep it alive," he said. "For larger pieces we need to develop different technologies that have been described in the medical field but have not been applied to meat production yet." That means building something a bit like blood vessels into the meat, which could provide fluid, oxygen and nutrients to the centre of the tissue as it grows.

Post acknowledges that it will be essential to produce a product that looks and tastes exactly the same as real meat. And if they find there is a market for cultured beef, the same methods could be used to grow other proteins such as chicken, lamb, fish or pork in the lab.

The research (and the carefully arranged public tasting) has been funded by a backer who has chosen to remain anonymous until the press conference, to avoid overshadowing the hamburger itself. Critics might argue that holding a public event to showcase the work instead of presenting results in a peer-reviewed journal could alienate scientific colleagues, who might be sceptical about the work.

Dr Post's response is that most of the methods he is using – involving engineering and growing large numbers of cow stem cells – have already been published in journals. His hamburger, he said, was more a result of brute force in growing more material than anyone else has so far. "From the technological point of view there are very few secrets here," he said.

Monday's event is "a big responsibility", he said. "This is going to make or break the future of cultured beef. This is a good cause to fight for and if in any way this type of approach through the media affects that in a negative way then I would feel bad."

He added: "I'm pretty confident that the product, as we present it on Monday, that people will like it and will say 'this is the way we should go, this is a good direction.'"

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Nemo can also be viewed on YouTube.

ITHACA, N.Y. — Playful as a puppy even at 730 pounds, Nemo, a rescued black-and-white Hampshire pig, became a porcine pioneer after lymphoma struck.

Undergoing a novel care plan, he became a teaching case for veterinary oncologists at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals, paving the way to combat cancer in large animals.

Nemo is believed to be the first pig to be treated for lymphoma. The pig’s medical treatment began when his owner, George Goldner, saw his friend fall ill.

“I want to do everything humanly possible for my animals,” said Goldner. When the 4-year-old had a coughing fit and laid down in the snow, Goldner drove Nemo nearly four hours to Cornell’s hospital, where the pig was diagnosed with presumptive B-cell lymphoma, a blood cancer.

Cornell hospital clinicians worked to prepare for intravenous medication delivery. In the first such procedure ever done to treat a sick pig, surgeon Jim Flanders, who had performed similar procedures in smaller animals, joined large-animal surgeon Susan Fubini to surgically implant a vascular access port.

They ran a catheter up a vein in Nemo’s neck to a port behind his ear, creating a route for delivering drugs where they would be most effective while minimizing harm. Resident Emily Barrell selected and delivered the chemotherapeutic drugs.

“Although lymphoma has been documented in swine, there aren’t any documented cases of pigs being treated for it,” said Cornell hospital oncologist Cheryl Balkman. “We adapted a treatment plan based on what we know is effective in dogs, cats and humans with lymphoma.”

Nemo’s clinical signs soon resolved, and he has continued to do well during long-term treatment. Though little is known about the prognosis for pigs with cancer, Nemo has the notable distinction of establishing a precedent, giving veterinarians valuable information for helping large animals. Since arriving in March, Nemo has resided at Cornell’s hospital for animals.

“He has a better life there,” said Goldner. “He’s running around digging holes, eating pineapples, communicating vocally and getting lots of love. Cornell Hospital for Animals people play with him and bring him treats, and he plays funny tricks like tossing water at the residents. The vets have cared for him with amazing dedication and thoughtfulness, especially Dr. Barrell. It’s been a wonderful effort on the part of several people: a testament to the outstanding work done at Cornell.”

 

12 Finalists to Display Projects at El Capitan Theatre, Hollywood, May 3-June 19

Grand Prize Winners to Receive Awards in Special Ceremony on May 3rd

BURBANK, CALIF. (May 3, 2013) –When Marvel’s “Iron Man 3” lands in theatres, it’s going to have company—some of the brightest young scientific minds in America.

Disney announced the 12 finalists in theMarvel’sIRON MAN 3: Inventor and InnovatOR Fair,a nationwide science competition held in conjunction with the release of “Iron Man 3”, sponsored by Discovery Science Center, Broadcom Foundation and Marvel Studios, along with Visa Signature and the famousEl Capitan Theatre in Hollywood., On the evening of May 3rd,at the 4:30pm screening of Marvel’s “Iron Man 3,” Grand Prize winners will receive their awards in a special ceremony onstage at the El Capitan Theatre, hosted by Asa Kalama, a Walt Disney Imagineer. All 12InventorandInnovatOR Fair finalists will have their projects on display at the El Capitan from May 3rd – June 19th.

Like Iron Man’s alter ego, Tony Stark, these young geniuses are discovering and creating the world for tomorrow. And getting to be a finalist hasn’t been easy. Sixth through ninth-grade girls and boys across the nation were invited to participate in MARVEL’S IRON MAN 3: INVENTOR and INNOVATOR FAIR and asked to produce innovative, inventive projects based on STEM themes from “Iron Man 3” — STEM: (science,technology, engineering and math). The competition encouraged students to submit projects that aligned with the National Academy of Engineering’s (NAE) Grand Challenges for Engineering™.

Earlier this month, after judges reviewed over 300 science projects from all over the country, 30 semi-finalists were chosen. From the 30 semi-finalists, the panel of judges chose 12 finalists, who will compete for the grand prize awards.

Following are the 12 finalists and their winning projects:

  • Anin Sayana, Cupertino, Calif. – “A Novel Configuration of Carbon Nanotubes to Inhibit ABCG2 and Selectively Target Chemotherapy-Resistant Cancer Stem Cells
  • Arjun Dhawan, Newburgh, Ind. – “Walking with Sensors”
  • Audrey Harris, Nokomis, Fla. – “Opening New Opportunities”
  • Cassie Drury, Louisville, Ky. – “Exploring Cell Signaling in Wound Healing”
  • Chase Lewis, Chapel Hill, N.C. – “Rescue Travois- Saving Lives”
  • Emma Christensen, Greenville, N.C. – “Saved by the Bug”
  • Galen Lee, Cottondale, Ala. – “Solar Funnel Cooler”
  • Justin Abrahim – Pittsburgh, Pa. – “Ouch! Helmets and Concussions”
  • Maya Patel, The Woodlands, Texas – “Gauging Inferno Sprawl”
  • Megan Swintosky, Hatfield, Pa. – “Novel Mutations in the FLCN Gene in Cases of Familial Spontaneous Pneumothoraces”
  • Shixuan Justin Li, Lynn Haven, Fla. – “No Mo Squites”
  • Stephen Coyne, Knoxville, Md. – “Robotic Prosthetics: A Hand Prototype”

Grand Prize judges for theMarvel’sIRON MAN 3: Inventor and InnovatOR Fairwill be Dr. Henry Samueli, Chairman of the Board, Broadcom Corporation; Joe Adams, President, Discovery Science Center; Janet Yamaguchi, Vice President of Education, Discovery Science Center; Dr. Yannis Yortsos, Dean of the Viterbi School of Engineering, University of Southern California; and Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, Chairman and CEO, NantWorks, LLC.

The 12 finalists of the Marvel’sIRON MAN 3: Inventor and InnovatOR Fair won a trip to Southern California, provided by Visa Signature. The trip includes a meeting with Disney Imagineers, a trip to Disneyland, a visit to Discovery Science Center, a special experience at Broadcom Foundation, and more.

About the Movie

Marvel’s “Iron Man 3” pits brash-but-brilliant industrialist Tony Stark/Iron Man against an enemy whose reach knows no bounds. When Stark finds his personal world destroyed at his enemy's hands, he embarks on a harrowing quest to find those responsible. This journey, at every turn, will test his mettle. With his back against the wall, Stark is left to survive by his own devices, relying on his ingenuity and instincts to protect those closest to him. As he fights his way back, Stark discovers the answer to the question that has secretly haunted him: does the man make the suit or does the suit make the man?

Starring Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Guy Pearce, Rebecca Hall, Stephanie Szostak, James Badge Dale with Jon Favreau and Ben Kingsley, Marvel’s “Iron Man 3” is directed by Shane Black from a screenplay by Drew Pearce & Shane Black and is based on Marvel’s iconicSuper Hero Iron Man, who first appeared on the pages of “Tales of Suspense” (#39) in 1963 and had his solo comic book debut with “The Invincible Iron Man” (#1) in May of 1968.

Marvel’s “Iron Man 3” is presented by Marvel Studios in association with Paramount Pictures and DMG Entertainment. Marvel Studios’ President Kevin Feige is producing and Jon Favreau, Louis D’Esposito, Charles Newirth, Victoria Alonso, Stephen Broussard, Alan Fine, Stan Lee and Dan Mintz are executive producers. The film releases May 3, 2013, and is distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures.

About Marvel Entertainment

Marvel Entertainment, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is one of the world's most prominent character-based entertainment companies, built on a proven library of over 8,000 characters featured in a variety of media over seventy years. Marvel utilizes its character franchises in entertainment, licensing and publishing. For more information visitmarvel.com.

About El Capitan Theatre

Step into Hollywood’s glittering past at the legendary El Capitan Theatre, which made its debut on May 3, 1926 as Hollywood’s first home of Spoken Drama. This grand theatre has been restored to its original elegance of Spanish Colonial exterior and boasts a colorful and lavish East Indian interior designed by renowned San Francisco architect G. Albert Lansburgh. In 1941, Orsen Welles’ Academy Award® winning CITIZEN KANE made its World Premiere at the El Capitan. As an exclusive first run theatre for Walt Disney Studios, today the El Capitan Theatre sets a new standard for World Premieres, live stage shows, Disney attractions, and other special events that have helped restore showmanship to Hollywood Boulevard. For more information, visit www.elcapitantickets.com or call 1-800-DISNEY6.

About Discovery Science Center

For 25 years, Discovery Science Center (DSC) has been a non-profit organization dedicated to educating young minds, assisting educators teach science and increasing public understanding of science, technology, engineering and math through interactive exhibits and programs. With one of the largest education outreach programs in the county and an unparalleled approach at creating immersive, game-based exhibits, DSC is revolutionizing how educational content is delivered. Throughout the year, guests can take the Eco Challenge and become a green superhero or feel the power of a simulated rocket engine launch. Traveling exhibits and annual events such asSpooky Science and Bubblefest throughout the year ensure that there is always something new to discover. DSC owns and operates the Taco Bell Discovery Science Center based in Santa Ana, CA and will be opening a second facility in Los Angeles in 2014. For more information, call (714) 542-CUBE or visit www.discoverycube.org.

About Broadcom Foundation

Broadcom Foundation was founded to inspire and enable young people throughout the world to enter careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through partnerships with local schools, colleges, universities and non-profit organizations. Broadcom Foundation is the proud sponsor of the Broadcom MASTERS®, a program of Society for Science & the Public - a national science and engineering competition for middle school children. The Foundation's mission is to advance education in STEM by funding research, recognizing scholarship and increasing opportunity. Learn more atwww.broadcomfoundation.org.

About Visa Signature

Visa Signature is a premium consumer payment card bringing cardholders benefits and perks that offer special access and provide everyday value Visa Signature cardholders get access to exclusive movie ticket offers to movies like Marvel’s Iron Man 3 at www.Fandango.com/VisaSignature.Visa Signature is a proud sponsor of the theatrical release of Marvel’s Iron Man 3. Visa Signature cardholders enjoy benefits such as complimentary 24-hour concierge services, access to the Visa Signature Luxury Hotel Collection and exclusive offers for fine wine and food, travel, and sports and great entertainment events like Marvel’sIron Man 3. For moreinformation visitwww.visa.com/signature.

About National Academy of Engineering

The US National Academy of Engineering (NAE) is a private, independent, nonprofit institution that provides engineering leadership in service to the nation. The mission of the National Academy of Engineering is to advance the well being of the nation by promoting a vibrant engineering profession and by marshaling the expertise and insights of eminent engineers to provide independent advice to the federal government on matters involving engineering and technology. Established in 1964, NAE operates under the congressional charter granted to the National Academy of Sciences in 1863. Find out more atwww.nae.edu.

About Asa Kalama

Asa Kalama is a Walt Disney Imagineer and the host of the award-winning educational DVD series, The Science of Disney Imagineering, which uses roller coasters, stunt shows and animatronics to teach scientific principles such as energy and trajectory. Learn more at www.disneyeducation.com.

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