Displaying items by tag: older dogs

Order Your 2019 Grey Muzzle Calendar Today!

Order your 2019 Grey Muzzle calendar and have lots of sweet sugar faces to stare at next year. Trust us, it's good for the soul. All proceeds benefit senior dog programs nationwide.

October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month!

Here are a few adorable and adoptable seniors looking for love.  

Gramma Tala

8 years old, Frederick County Animal Control in MD

Serena & Venus

7 years old, Little Shelter Animal Rescue in NY

Duck

8 years old, Humane Society of Western Montana

Dear Friends,

All of us at Grey Muzzle continue to be touched byyour amazing love of old dogs. As October draws to a close, I am looking forward to the last two months of 2018 and to celebrating the happy endings you have made possible this year.

And I'm thrilled that we have so many ways to celebrate--from our 2019 calendar to our #WhyWeLoveOldDogs contest to a brand new TV show featuring our grantees' adoptable dogs. Thank you for being part of the Grey Muzzle family and having a heart for senior dogs!

Warmly,

Lisa Lunghofer, PhD

Executive Director

Enter Our #WhyWeLoveOldDogs Contest

If you share your life with an amazing, aging dog, then tell the world about your best friend! In anticipation of Adopt a Senior Pet Month in November, we’re asking everyone who adores an old dog to help spread the word by sharing #WhyWeLoveOldDogs on social media.

You and your dog could be selected as one of ten winners to be posted on our website and receive prizes. Read more...

Meet Dexter!

Dexter, a blind 12-year-old Shih Tzu, found himself at Madison County Illinois Animal Control after being surrendered by his owner. Thanks to Grey Muzzle's grant, Partners for Pets was able to rescue him. Read more about Dexter...

New Partnership with DOGTV & The Adoption Show

We’ve embarked on a new partnership with DOGTV and The Adoption Show! The Adoption Show will feature adoptable senior dogs from our grantees on Facebook. You can catch the first Grey Muzzle episode here. If you adopt one of the dogs featured, you receive an adoption gift basket filled with $500 worth of goodies for your pup. And for each new subscription to DOGTV, Grey Muzzle will receive $10. Learn more...

Seeking a Treasurer

Do you have a financial, accounting or bookkeeping background? Do you get excited about budgets, audits and numbers? Do you love old dogs? If this is you, come volunteer with The Grey Muzzle Organization!

We're looking for a highly qualified Treasurer to serve on our Board of Directors. The Treasurer provides leadership, governance and oversight and has overall responsibility for the integrity of all financial information. Learn more...

Connect with us!

             

     

UNCONDITIONAL

Older Dogs, Deeper Love

By

Jane Sobel Klonsky

Anyone who has ever shared life with a dog knows that the human-canine bond is one that only grows stronger as dogs get older. For years celebrated photographer and dog lover Jane Sobel Klonsky longed to pursue a project featuring dogs but couldn’t find the right catalyst. It wasn't until a chance meeting at an insurance office in 2012 led her to witness the incredible relationship between Angela, the insurance broker, and her senior Bulldog, Clementine, that it came to her. Since then Jane has traveled the United States with one mission: to capture images and stories that focus on the powerful relationship between humans and their older dogs.

Her book UNCONDITIONAL: Older Dogs, Deeper Love(National Geographic Books; October 25, 2016; $19.95; 208 pages) is a captivating collection of photographs and stories that celebrates humans' special bond with, and love for, their senior dogs. The dogs represented in the book include senior rescues with their adopters, service dogs with those they assist and guide, working dogs with their handlers, and lifelong cherished family pets with the people who dote on them.For each of her subjects, Jane collected personal accounts of their lives intertwined with their canine companions. Together with the photographs, these raw, funny, sometimes heartbreaking stories celebrate the enduring bond between humans and dogs.

Of Jane's photographs, bestselling author Lewis Blackwell says, “Jane has brought her strong photographic sensibilities to explore a delicate and moving subject in a profoundly touching way. It’s a subject that seems tailor-made for the warmth that comes naturally to her images, and yet also enables her to open out and reveal a strong documentary edge.”

UNCONDITIONAL will resonate with anyone now enjoying a close bond with a pet, and it will provide comfort to those who have lost old friends. It’s a beautiful reminder to cherish our older animals and the rich moments we have with them, and to thank them for the love and friendship they unconditionally offer us.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Jane Sobel Klonsky launched her photography career in 1976 as the first photographer to scale the cables to the top of the Verrazano Bridge to get a shot of the start of the New York City Marathon. For nearly thirty years, she was a major player in the world of commercial and sports photography. Her work has taken her around the world to Kenya to shoot photos of a family of Masaai Warriors; to record an international running competition in Tokyo; and to chronicle the untouched beauty of far-reaching places like Papua New Guinea, and Myanmar (Burma). Her award-winning photographs have been published widely, and have been the subject of several books, including one based on a 50,000 mile cross-country photographic tour of rural America taken with her photographer husband and two Great Danes. She continues to do extensive work for Getty Images. Mother to up-and-coming filmmaker Kacey, she lives with her husband, Arthur, their two therapy dogs, Charlie and Sam, and a cat, Humphrey, in rural Vermont.

UNCONDITIONAL

Older Dogs, Deeper Love

by Jane Sobel Klonsky

October 25, 2016

National Geographic Books

$19.95

ISBN: 978-1426217111

208 Pages

 
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Will you consider giving a senior dog or cat a home this Thanksgiving?

Hi,

Senior pets are often the last to be adopted from shelters, putting them at increased risk of euthanasia. When you adopt a senior pet, you’re not only welcoming a lifetime of love into your home, you’re also saving a life.

If you do decide to bring a senior dog or cat home, I'm sure they will be forever thankful to have a warm home and a loving family this holiday season.

To learn more about how and where you can adopt, click the image above or here.  If you would prefer to reach out to us directly, send us a note.

Happy Thanksgiving,
Dave Merrick

466 South Segoe Road Madison, Wisconsin 53711 USA
 
 
 
 
Grey Muzzle Organization Grants $225K in Funding for Senior Dog Programs at 38 Organizations Nationwide
 
RALEIGH, N.C.--Senior pups have something to wag about this week, as the national nonprofit The Grey Muzzle Organization announces the recipients of its annual grants for animal welfare organizations providing programs for at-risk senior dogs. Thirty-eight organizations representing 25 states will receive over $225,000 in funding from the group in 2016 to support services, including hospice care for senior dogs who are not adoptable, “Senior for Senior” adoption programs, and medical and dental care. Since 2008, Grey Muzzle has provided over $750,000 in grants to 76 nonprofit organizations in 30 states in support of its “vision of a world where no old dog dies alone and afraid.”
 
“The Grey Muzzle Organization was with Muttville Senior Dog Rescue from the very beginning,” says Sherri Franklin, Executive Director of Muttville, another 2016 grantee. “Without their support we wouldn’t be where we are today, saving more senior dogs than ever!”
 
This year’s Grey Muzzle Organization grantees include:
  • Tyson's Place Animal Rescue, a Michigan organization dedicated to helping terminally ill people care for--and ultimately, find homes for--beloved pets like Bosco, a 14-year-old rat terrier mix currently up for adoption.

 

  • Rainbow Friends Animal Sanctuary on theBig Island of Hawaii, where dogs like 13-year-old Pono, who recently found his forever home, are treated to therapeutic swimming pool visits as part of their medical care.
  • Austin Pug Rescue, where the breed’s special medical needs are a priority. 11-year-old Ebenezer, who had to have all of his teeth removed due to severe periodontal disease, is now feeling fresh-mouthed and fine!

“One of the most gratifying parts of our work is getting to hear success stories about second chances for dogs in their golden years,” says The Grey Muzzle Organization Executive Director Lisa Lunghofer. “We’re thrilled to help so many deserving organizations give senior dogs the happy endings they deserve.”
 
A complete list of Grey Muzzle’s 2016 grantees, including videos and photos, is available at www.greymuzzle.org and upon request.
 
The national nonprofit The Grey Muzzle Organization improves the lives of at-risk senior dogs by providing funding and resources to animal shelters, rescue organizations, sanctuaries, and other non-profit groups nationwide.

Degenerative myelopathy is a degenerative disease of the spinal cord that begins in older adulthood and progresses slowly until dogs are no longer able to walk unassisted. The cause of the disease is associated with a mutation in the SOD1 gene. It is not known exactly how the mutation of this gene leads to degeneration of the spinal cord in dogs, but the disease does interfere with the brain’s communication to the limbs, resulting in difficulty walking.

Dr. Beth Boudreau, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, further explained the disease. “In degenerative myelopathy, the pathways that carry neural information in the spinal cord lose their insulatory coating and begin to fragment, and eventually the neurons that produce those signals also begin to die,” she said. “This results in a loss of motor control that begins in the hind limbs, but can spread to involve the front limbs as well as the pathways that control breathing, urination, and defecation. Currently, these changes are irreversible. Advanced cases may cause difficulty breathing as well. The disease is considered to be eventually fatal.”

The signs of degenerative myelopathy often begin around eight to nine years of age in larger breeds, and small breeds may have a later onset of signs around eleven years of age. Initially, mild stumbling, weakness, or incoordination of the hind limbs may be apparent. Although both hind limbs are usually affected, one is often weaker than the other. The signs slowly progress over a period of weeks to months and the disease does not cause the dog any apparent pain.

Testing for the associated mutation is an important part of the diagnosis of degenerative myelopathy. However, some dogs that have this mutation may never develop the disease, so a positive result of the genetic test alone cannot be relied upon for diagnosis. Additionally, other health conditions may share similar signs of degenerative myelopathy.

“Compared to other common causes of chronic spinal cord injury in older dogs, degenerative myelopathy often has a slower onset and progression, and it is not painful,” Boudreau said. “However, other spinal cord diseases, such as chronic intervertebral disc herniation, and even some tumors, may appear clinically similar. A complete evaluation with diagnostics and performed by a neurologist is recommended to rule out diseases that can mimic degenerative myelopathy.”

Currently, there is no known effective medical or surgical treatment for degenerative myelopathy. However, physical rehabilitation therapy at veterinary clinics has been shown to result in longer survival times for dogs affected by the disease.

“Unfortunately, this disease progresses, with most dogs becoming unable to walk within six to nine months after the first signs appear,” Boudreau said. “Because this condition does not appear to be painful, many dogs can continue to have a good quality of life even after they become unable to walk, if provided good supportive care. Dogs that cannot walk will need an assistance device, such as a cart or harness, to help them move about.”

Additionally, severely affected dogs may need assistance to void their bladders. Regular passive exercise of the limbs, turning, and cleaning are needed to prevent limb contractures and bedsores. Although many dogs tolerate the necessary nursing care very well, it is important for owners of dogs with degenerative myelopathy to regularly communicate with their veterinarian and assess their pet’s quality of life.

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Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Neutricks and Neutricks for Cats are an exciting new approach to healthy brain aging for the senior pet wellness market.

Based on the success of the protein “apoaequorin” (originally discovered in jellyfish) in canine trials, Neutricks developed two new supplements to support your pet’s cognitive health with a unique approach for both dogs and cats. Neutricks for Dogs has been formulated as a tasty chewable tablet that dogs love. Neutricks for Cats is available in a great tasting fish flavored sprinkle.

About Neutricks

Neutricks is focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of novel supplements to provide support during age-related changes in memory, cognitive performance and related issues of aging pets. The Company’s first product, Neutricks brand dietary supplement (apoaequorin), is now available for sale by veterinarians. Neutricks is backed by research that shows it helps support brain cell health.

Just like people, animals can experience mild memory problems associated with aging. A pet that seems strangely distant, confused, or disoriented, may be a candidate. More than 28 million pets (dogs and cats) in the U.S. have canine mild memory issues. Independent research and veterinarian testimonials have reported that Neutricks® has positive benefits on animals with mild memory issues. As veterinary care increases the life span of our pets, the senior pet wellness market will grow. The pet-nutritional market was valued at $2.1 billion dollars in 2007 and 43% of this figure is from the sale of pet supplements alone. Sales of pet supplements are expected to reach $1.7 billion by 2012. There is growing demand for new and effective products to meet the needs of older pets.

Better primary medical care has led to longer-lived dogs and cats, and a subsequent increase in the prevalence of senior mild memory issues. In a study at the University of California-Davis, 62% of 11- to 16-year-old dogs showed signs in at least one category of memory impairment. In a survey of pet owners, nearly half of dogs age 8 and older showed at least one sign associated with mild memory problems. The Veterinary Journal published a recent study of pets seen by veterinarians in whom they estimated that 14.2 percent of older pets presented with mild memory problems yet only 1.9% were addressing the problems.

Save a Pet's Life Today

Issue #11 - Frequently Asked Questions about Neutricks


Where can I get Neutricks®

Neutricks® is sold to veterinarians from the following distributors;

What is the dose for Neutricks®?

One (1) chew tablet per 40 pounds is recommended.

How does Neutricks® work?

The technology revolves around the patented protein 'apoaequorin', a Calcium Binding Protein (CaBp) found in a specific species of jellyfish, (aequoria victoria).

As animals age, they stop producing their own Calcium Binding Proteins and we simply replace these diminished proteins with our 100% natural protein (apoaequorin).

Quincy Animal Health is now prepared to help our pets.

What is the active ingredient in Neutricks®?

Apoaequorin, (the active ingredient in Neutricks®) is a naturally occurring substance; discovered in 1962 in a species of jellyfish (Aequoria Victoria) in Puget Sound, WA. This research eventually led to the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. This natural calcium-binding protein is remarkably similar to the ones found in the human body! It is actually closer to some cells than they are to their cousin cells.

Is Neutricks® safe?

100% Natural and Proven to be Non-Allergenic and our toxicity studies have also shown that Apoaequorin is non-toxic (5,000 mg/kg), non-allergenic, and has no known adverse reactions.


Visit Neutricks.com today »


Or call toll-free 877-681-4321 to order or learn more about Neutricks®



Get a FREE bottle

Test your dog's brain health & receive a FREE bottle of Neutricks! Start now »



See our research



Visit our research page »


Contact Us

Quincy Animal Health
301 S. Westfield Rd.
Suite 200
Madison, WI 53717
877-681-4321
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.




“I gave him Neutricks® on the advice of our vet and saw improvement quickly.”

Biscuit

Last summer my now 11 year old Jack Russell, Biscuit, began looking and acting confused. He would go hide behind our sofa (never did this before), go out at night in our yard and get lost (I had to go out and bring him in) and often looked at me as though he was "out of it."

I gave him Neutricks® on the advice of our vet and saw improvement quickly. We are almost at the end of our 60 count bottle, and he has been his usual self for awhile now. I will continue buying this for him because it works really well.

Purchase Neutricks® Today

Neutricks Bottle
Butler Schein Order Neutricks
Product #: 039121
MWI Order Neutricks
Product #: 037775
MVS Order Neutricks
Product #: 584.5000.3
Miller Order Neutricks
Product #: 1721-0060-00
Nevsco
Do you need a senior pet wellness checkup?

Issue #6 - Neutricks featured in Veterinary Practice News

Neutricks featured in Veterinary Practice News

It starts with the unexpected. Perhaps an incident of house soiling that's totally out of character. Or a lack of response when a dog is called by name. Maybe some aimless wandering, a new phobia, or dazed and anxious looks when entering a familiar place.

These are symptoms of cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS), a condition of aging that some veterinary practitioners say deserves increase attention in pets, especially now that new tools for treatment are emerging.

The latest option is Neutricks, a chewable dietary supplement designed to protect brain cells and combat cognitive decline in pets…

View the rest of the article »


Visit Neutricks.com today »


Or call toll-free 877-681-4321 to order or learn more about Neutricks®



Get a FREE bottle

Test your dog's brain health & receive a FREE bottle of Neutricks! Start now »



See our research



Visit our research page »


Contact Us

Quincy Animal Health
301 S. Westfield Rd.
Suite 200
Madison, WI 53717
877-681-4321
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.




“Now she's participating in our lives again.”

Meka

Linda saw her 12-year-old Japanese Chin – (Meka), shed her lethargy and listlessness while on Neutricks. “She had gotten to where she was wandering without seeming to know where she was,” Bartlett says. “Now she’s participating in our lives again. It has really opened our eyes. There were a couple of days I wanted to take it myself.”

Purchase Neutricks® Today

Neutricks Bottle
Butler Schein Order Neutricks
Product #: 039121
MWI Order Neutricks
Product #: 037775
MVS Order Neutricks
Product #: 584.5000.3
Miller Order Neutricks
Product #: 1721-0060-00
Nevsco Order Neutricks
 

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