Displaying items by tag: mountain lion

Talkin' Pets News

December 7, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Maria Ryan - DogGone Positive

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Darien Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

TPR News
April 16, 2016
CREW
Jon Patch - Host
Jillyn Sidlo - Co-Host
Bob Page - Executive Producer
Lexi Lapp - Producer
Ben - Network Producer
Special Guests:
Nat Geo Wild - Laura Dash of Second Chance Chihuahuas will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 4/16/16 at 5pm EST to discuss the premiere of her new TV program
Jim Toolan, Partner of Benebone will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 4/16/16 at 630 pm EST to discuss their company and in a contest give away 2 benebone box of bones to 2 lucky shelters - read below and enter contest for your favorite shelter

 

Donated items at the Born Free USA Washington, D.C. office weigh more than 750 pounds; include mountain lion, zebra, and bison

Washington, D.C., March 1, 2016 -- Today, Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, announced the completion of the second annual Born Free USA Fur for the Animals campaign: a four-month donation drive that collected 392 fur items from around the world to distribute to U.S. wildlife rehabilitation centers, where they will be used to comfort orphaned and injured animals. This year, the organization not only received fur coats and fashion accessories, but also a variety of other objects including a mountain lion, bison, and zebra hide. The office now has more than 750 pounds of donations, estimated at $750,000, representing approximately 12,000 animals who died for these products.  

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA and Born Free Foundation, “It is quite a dramatic statement by the public for us to receive nearly 400 donations -- coats,  hats, rugs, pillows, and toys -- all made from animals who were killed for these products. People do not know what to do with these once they realize that fur is neither luxurious nor fashionable. Our solution is to put those furs to far better use comforting and providing warmth to wild animals in need, rather than perpetuating the image of a brutal industry. We thank everyone who was compassionate enough to donate their old garments to the Fur for the Animals drive this year.”

While the majority of donations were mink, rabbit, and fox, Fur for the Animals received several surprising, disturbing items. Among them: a child’s fur teddy bear, and hides from white-tailed deer, bison, and zebra. Most shocking is a tattered rug made from a trophy-hunted mountain lion, including the claws and head.

“When the box with the lion was opened in our office, we were all truly devastated. While the lion rug is too torn up to be of use to a wildlife rehabilitation center, Born Free USA hopes it will serve as a compelling reminder to all who see it that such ‘trophies’ are not glorious, not beautiful, and not a celebration of wild animals in any way,” Roberts explains.   

Beginning next week, Born Free USA will send the donated fur to wildlife rehabilitation centers gearing up for the spring wildlife baby season. While most will be sent as they are for the rehabilitators to turn into the sizes they need to help their animals, some items have already been turned into blankets and pillows, thanks to the generous volunteers of Girl Scout Troop 5051 in Maryland. Earlier this month, the girls sewed, altered, and crafted several fur coats into smaller cushions and blankets specifically to comfort small, baby animals. 

This spring and summer, Born Free USA will ship the items to the following campaign partners:

  1. Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation, Kendalia, Texas
  2. The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center, Ramona, California
  3. California Wildlife Center, Malibu, California
  4. Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary, McCall, Idaho
  5. Peace River Wildlife Center, Punta Gorda, Florida
  6. Blue Ridge Wildlife Center, Boyce, Virginia
  7. Chintimini Wildlife Center, Corvallis, Oregon
  8. Desert Rescue Animal Sanctuary, Las Vegas, Nevada 

Additional wildlife rehabilitation partners are encouraged to participate. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information. 

Born Free USA commends the growing number of fashion retailers vowing to go fur-free. In July 2015, the luxury brand Hugo Boss announced it will remove real animal fur from its collections beginning with its Fall/Winter 2016 line. Hugo Boss is joining such brands as American Apparel, Esprit, H&M, Steve Madden, Marks & Spencer, and Topshop, among others, that have pledged to produce only fur free merchandise.

Born Free USA is a member of The Fur Free Alliance, an international coalition of animal protection organizations working to bring an end to the exploitation and killing of animals for their fur. The Fur Free Alliance represents more than 40 animal protection organizations in 28 countries and millions of supporters worldwide. 

Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic “pets,” trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to North America the message of “compassionate conservation”—the vision of the United Kingdom-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free USA’s mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.


 
April 18, 2015, Lima, Peru: Hoover the tiger, Mustafa the mountain lion and Condorito the condor have been removed from two circuses in northern Peru during raids as part of Animal Defenders International’s (ADI) mission to enforce Peru’s ban on the use of wild animals in circuses, Operation Spirit of Freedom.
 
ADI, Peruvian authorities ATFFS Piura, and the police moved in after ADI received tip-offs that two circuses were illegally operating with wild animals in the area. Both circuses heavily resisted the legal action, with riot police and the Public Prosecutor called in to secure the condor and mountain lion during a long and hostile stand-off.
 
Almost 80 animals have been rescued from circuses and the illegal wildlife trade during ADI’s Operation Spirit of Freedom so far.  The rescue mission will culminate in June with a huge airlift to Denver, Colorado of 33 lions, a bear and now Hoover the tiger. The animals are destined for The Wild Animal Sanctuary in Colorado where large acreage habitats are being prepared for them. ADI is also relocating nearly 50 native wild animals to a specially built facility at Pilpintuwasi near Iquitos in the Amazon with the Peruvian Air Force providing an aircraft for the animals and the Navy providing river transport.
 
Hoover the tiger was removed from Circo Africano, the same circus that Cholita, an endangered Andean spectacled bear who has won the public’s hearts, was removed from several years ago. Cholita, dubbed the “real life Paddington bear”, had her paws mutilated to remove her claws and has lost most of her fur.
 
Eight months ago, ADI was poised to remove two tigers from the same circus but it slipped through the net and eluded authorities until now – the other tiger died during that time. Hoover is the sole survivor of up to six tigers with the circus.  He is thin and will be monitored closely by the ADI veterinary team.
 
ADI was tipped off about the location of the circus via social media and began discussions with ATFFS Piura about the seizure operation whilst continuing to trail the circus.  The organisations were then tipped off about another circus in the area.
 
The second raid took place on Circo Koreander less than 24 hours after the first, in an isolated village in the same area of northern Peru.  A mountain lion called Mustafa who was kept chained in the back of a pick-up truck was removed by ADI along with Condorito the condor, named after a Chilean comic book character. The heated seizure saw police reinforcements and the Public Prosecutor called in. Legal proceedings are now underway concerning the circus’ obstruction of the seizure and to try and secure a monkey still with the circus.
 
The seizure operation began on Sunday with ADI trucks carrying cages heading to the circus locations, and ended on Friday morning with the animals arriving safely at ADI’s Spirit of Freedom Rescue Center near Lima.
 
Animal Defenders International President Jan Creamer, who oversaw the difficult seizures in Peru this week said, “Before we began seizure operations with the Peruvian authorities last year, ADI conducted a census of all animal circuses in Peru.  Some disappeared as soon as the first seizures took place, but we have steadily tracked down every circus that was on that list and removed their wild animals. It has been public tip-offs to ADI that have led to the seizures on the last three circuses so we urge people to remain vigilant and report any sightings of wild animals in circuses.”
 
Jan Creamer:  “A huge thank you to the Piura ATFFS, police and Public Prosecutor who stood up for these animals in very difficult circumstances and ensured the animals were safely removed by ADI.”
 
ADI’s Spirit of Freedom flight to take the 33 lions and Cholita the bear to the USA had originally been planned for April. However, ADI, Peruvian authorities SERFOR and ATFFS, The Wild Animal Sanctuary and Denver International Airport all agreed the priority had to be saving the animals, and so the airlift has been postponed until June and will now take Hoover the tiger to a new life in the US.
 
Jan Creamer: “We never gave up hope that we would find the illegal circuses and give each and every animal the chance of a better life, free from their circus cages and chains.  Locating and raiding circuses all over Peru and looking after this number of different animals has been a huge challenge. Now we are looking forward to the next stage: getting all of the animals ADI has rescued to their new homes.”
 

Operation Spirit of Freedom rescue mission is expected to cost ADI over $1.2 million, with the biggest single cost being the flight to the US.
 
Please donate to help get Hoover the tiger, Cholita the bear and all the other animals saved during Operation Spirit of Freedom to their forever homes: www.ad-international.org/FreedomAppealUS or 323-935-2234.
 
More information about ADI’s Operation Spirit of Freedom
http://www.ad-international.org/SpiritofFreedom
 
South America circus bans: A two year undercover investigation by ADI from 2005 to 2007 led five countries in South America to ban wild animal circus acts – Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Paraguay and Colombia. In Central America, Mexico, El Salvador, Panama, and Costa Rica have also passed bans. Peru’s ban on wild animals in circuses was passed in 2012 following a successful campaign launched in 2007 by ADI and backed by local animal protection groups. Bolivia was the first South American country to ban wild animals in circuses and ADI was called in after most circuses defied the law. During its ‘Operation Lion Ark’ enforcement mission ADI raided eight illegal circuses in Bolivia rescuing all the animals including horses, dogs, coatis, monkeys, baboons and lions. ADI flew 25 lions to The Wild Animal Sanctuary in Colorado and 4 lions to California. The rescue is the subject of the multi-award-winning film Lion Ark. In August 2014, ADI began working with the Peruvian authorities to enforce its animal circus ban in a mission known as ‘Operation Spirit of Freedom’.
 
National restrictions on performing animals in travelling circuses, either wild, all animals, or in a handful of cases specific species have been enacted in 31 countries – Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, India, Israel, Malta, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Slovenia, Sweden, Taiwan, The Netherlands. Similar laws are under discussion in the UK, USA, Brazil and Chile.
 
Animal Defenders International
With offices in London, Los Angeles, Lima and Bogota, ADI campaigns across the globe on animals in entertainment, providing technical advice to governments, securing progressive animal protection legislation, drafting regulations and rescuing animals in distress. ADI has a worldwide reputation for providing video and photographic evidence exposing the behind-the-scenes suffering in industry and supporting this evidence with scientific research on captive wildlife and transport. ADI rescues animals all over the world, educates the public on animals and environmental issues. www.ad-international.org
 
www.wildanimalsanctuary.org

The Wild Animal Sanctuary (TWAS) is a 720 acre refuge in Keenesburg, Colorado, USA, for more than 350 rescued lions, tigers, bears, wolves and other large carnivores. ADI rescued 29 animals from circuses in Bolivia in 2010 and 2011 and the story of the 2011 seizure, rehabilitation and relocation of 25 of the lions to the TWAS is told in the movie, Lion Ark www.lionarkthemovie.com

 

Oakland, CA …March 18, 2015 – On Wednesday, March 18, 2015, from 6:30pm – 9:30pm, Oakland Zoo welcomes the public to attend a talk about mountain lions in our community. Leaders from the Bay Area Puma Project, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Mountain Lion Foundation will gather to discuss the hot topic of mountain lion conservation and conflict. Penny Nelson, reporter at the California Report, will moderate the panel presentation. The panel presentation will include Amy Gotliffe, Oakland Zoo’s Conservation Director, Lynn Cullens, Associate Director at Mountain Lion Foundation, Zara McDonald, President of Bay Area Puma Project, and Captain Steve Riske of California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

The evening will explore a unique collaboration centered on holistic mountain lion conservation in the Bay Area. Mountain lions are facing increasing challenges each year as humans encroach further into their habitat. “We live with lions,” said Amy Gotliffe, Conservation Director at Oakland Zoo. “As an apex predator that requires a large territory, mountain lions and humans are dealing with increasing ‘Human-Wildlife Conflict’ I am tremendously proud that the Bay Area Puma Project, the Mountain Lion Foundation, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oakland Zoo are working as an alliance to conserve these native animals. Communication, teamwork and imagination is what it will take to conserve all wildlife, and I am thrilled we are part of that path.” The organizations featured are partnering to create an alliance called BACAT (Bay Area Carnivore Action Team), created with the goal of protecting California's lions. Discussions will revolve around first-hand experiences with the pumas, problems they pose, and what it takes to conserve this native species.

The Conservation Speaker Series will take place in Oakland Zoo’s Zimmer Auditorium, located in the lower entrance of the Zoo. Parking is free and the admission price for the evening’s speaker presentations is $12.00 - $20.00 per person (sliding scale). All proceeds from this event will be donated to mountain lion conservation. Light refreshments will be served. For additional information about Oakland Zoo’s Conservation Speaker Series, please contact Amy Gotliffe, Conservation Director, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

ABOUT MOUNTAIN LIONS:

America's lion goes by a multitude of names: puma, cougar, mountain lion and catamount. The mountain lion in its natural element is an awe-inspiring animal, combining incredible physical capabilities, intelligence, stealth and beauty. The big cat’s territory extends from Canada to the tip of South America and these cats have the greatest geographical range of any land mammal. The local home range of a female mountain lion is 40 to 80 square miles, and a male's range is 100 to 200 square miles. Mountain lions live solitary lives except when mating, and when females are raising their young. They prefer to avoid humans, as well as each other.

Pumas have long and powerful hind legs. They can jump vertically up to 18 feet and 20 to 30 feet horizontally. Mountain lions cannot roar, as they lack the special apparatus in the larynx needed to produce that sound. They make similar sounds to a house cat, with a vocal repertoire that includes chirps, whistles, growls, hisses and screams.

Mountain lions are a generalist predator, which means they are opportunistic and will eat almost any animal, from mouse to moose. Deer make up 60-80% of their diet in North America. An adult male needs 6,000 calories per day, which is about one deer per week. As keystone predators, mountain lions are essential to a healthy ecosystem. They help keep deer populations in check, preventing them from overrunning the landscape and destroying the ground cover that so many other species depend on. Animals taken down by mountain lions help feed hundreds of other species, and by removing the weakest animals from the system; the mountain lion helps keep disease to a minimum, including some diseases that may affect humans. Because mountain lions require such large home ranges, they also serve as a bellwether for the habitat needs of other species. Any habitat or corridor protection measure that is effective for mountain lions will benefit many other species as well.

Their Conservation Challenge: The greatest threats to mountain lions are habitat loss and fragmentation, and conflict with humans, including road kill and depredation. According to state law, if a puma attacks a pet or livestock in California, the owner can acquire a depredation permit to have the puma killed. In recent years the number of permits issued has increased to about 100 per year. This number is higher than the sport hunting quotas in some states that allow puma hunting.

ABOUT THE PANEL:

Bay Area Puma Project: The Bay Area Puma Project (BAPP) was launched in 2008 by Felidae Conservation Fund to research and safeguard healthy puma populations and their key habitat patches in and around the greater SF Bay Area. With its unique combination of pioneering puma research, multi-faceted community engagement, hands-on education and effective conservation action, the intent is to raise ecological awareness, reduce human-wildlife conflict and cultivate healthy co-existence between humans and the region's top apex predator.

Mountain Lion Foundation: The Mountain Lion Foundation is dedicated to protecting mountain lions and their habitat for present and future generations. The Foundation works closely with legislative, governmental and conservation groups to heighten public awareness and educate policy makers on conservation issues such as predator friendly livestock management practices, workable wildlife corridors, harmonious human/mountain lion interactions, and the vital role of the mountain lion in a healthy ecosystem.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife: The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW, or Cal Fish) is a department within the government of California, falling under its parent California Natural Resources Agency. The Department of Fish and Wildlife manages and protects the state's diverse fish, wildlife, plant resources, and native habitats. The department is also responsible for the diversified use of fish and wildlife including recreational, commercial, scientific and educational uses. The department also utilizes its law enforcement division to prevent and stop illegal poaching.

Oakland Zoo: Oakland Zoo is committed to taking action for wildlife, and conservation is at the center of our mission. We are deeply involved with conservation efforts globally, locally and right on our own zoo grounds. We are dedicated to using our resources and expertise to work in partnership with local organizations to conserve and protect mountain lions.

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area’s award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid’s activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information please visit our website at www.oaklandzoo.org.

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