Displaying items by tag: felines

About Felisept

Felisept is a natural stress-reliever for cats of all breeds, colors, and sizes. Made with an extract of the mint plant we all know as "catnip", this plant is a natural attractant for cats and other feline species that helps create a sense of calm for them. When used in a cat's environment, Felisept can help curb their unwanted behavior that is often caused by feeling stressed. 

Felisept is available in two options to better suit your long-term or short-term needs. Try the fast-acting Felisept Spray to make travel and vet visits less troublesome for you and your cat, or plug in the long-lasting Felisept Diffuser to help your cat relax at home. Stress at home can be caused by many things for your cat, including:

• Fireworks
• Thunderstorms
• New family members
• Welcoming a new pet
• Rearranged furniture
• Animals outside in the yard

 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF FELINE PRACTITIONERS RELEASES NEW FELINE ANESTHESIA GUIDELINES 
TO THE VETERINARY COMMUNITY

First exclusive Feline Anesthesia Guidelines authored by an expert panel aim to make anesthesia and sedation safer for the feline patient

[HILLSBOROUGH, NJ – July 10, 2018] The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) today released the first Feline-specific Anesthesia Guidelines to the veterinary community, which are published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. General anesthesia is an essential component of feline practice, without which surgery and certain other treatment modalities and diagnostic procedures would be impossible. These Feline-focused Guidelines are vital to cat health. Due to their unique physiology and small size, cats undergoing anesthesia are at a relatively greater risk of complications and mortality than many other species. Empirical evidence shows that cats undergoing anesthesia have a higher mortality rate compared with dogs.1,2

Relying on a standardized, evidence-based approach for administering anesthesia is especially useful for ensuring the patient’s safe and predictable perioperative response and recovery. These Guidelines address specific causes of disparities and ways of avoiding perioperative complications associated with monitoring, airway management, fluid therapy, and recovery. Additionally, the Guidelines discuss other important aspects of feline anesthesia, including perianesthetic anxiety and stress, perianesthetic monitoring by physical and electronic means, the role of underlying diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the correct use of anesthesia equipment, and total injectable anesthesia. Content has been organized in the following areas: use and care of equipment, preanesthetic assessment, comorbidities, critical patient emergencies, anesthesia and sedation, perioperative complications, and anesthesia recovery. 

“The overarching purpose of the AAFP Anesthesia Guidelines is to make anesthesia and sedation safer for the feline patient. We are committed to improving the health and welfare of all cats and providing this resource to veterinary teams is an important milestone,” said Heather O’Steen, CEO of the AAFP.

The Guidelines were authored by an expert panel and include visuals and other information designed to minimize risks associated with anesthesia; namely, tables, charts, and algorithms that are very useful resources for veterinary teams. These invaluable tips and techniques for the practice team start even before the patient leaves home and goes through the critical recovery period. The associated client brochure provides cat caregivers with digestible information that enables them to understand anesthesia, what to expect, properly prepare their cat for a procedure, and care for them during recovery (catfriendly.com/anesthesia).

“By proactively developing an individualized anesthetic plan that considers the uniqueness of each feline patient and recognizing that ‘one size does not fit all,’ the experience for the cat can be improved and the outcome successful. It is our hope that these Guidelines will become the practice’s go-to resource and each team member will have a new awareness of all the tools and techniques available to them,” in a joint statement, said Guidelines Co-Chairs Susan M. Gogolski, DVM, PMP, DABVP (Canine/Feline) and Sheilah A. Robertson, BVMS (Hons), PhD, DACVAA, DECVAA, DACAW, DECAWBM (WSEL), MRCVS.

It is recommended that these Guidelines – endorsed by the International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) – be used in conjunction with other previously published guidelines (freely accessible at catvets.com/guidelines), such as those on feline friendly handling, feline friendly nursing care, senior care, pain management, and fluid therapy, as they each contain specific information that should be considered when sedating and/or anesthetizing cats. The Anesthesia Guidelines and associated supplemental resources are available for download on the AAFP website (catvets.com/anesthesia) so practice teams can easily retrieve, print, and laminate them for quick reference. They can also be attached to anesthesia machines and displayed on walls in the preparation, surgery, and recovery areas.

To access the Guidelines, supplemental resources, and client brochure, visit: catvets.com/anesthesia.

To access the AAFP’s consumer site with anesthesia information for cat owners, visit: catfriendly.com/anesthesia

1 Dyson DH, Maxie MG and Schnurr D. Morbidity and mortality associated with anesthetic management in small animal veterinary practice in Ontario. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc1998; 34: 325–335.

2 Brodbelt DC, Pfeiffer DU, Young LE, et al. Risk factors for anaesthetic-related death in cats: results from the confidential enquiry into perioperative small animal fatalities (CEPSAF). Br J Anaesth 2007; 99: 617–623.

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About the American Association of Feline Practitioners
The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) supports its members in improving the health and welfare of cats through high standards of practice, continuing education, and evidence-based medicine. As a trusted leader in the veterinary community, the AAFP has a long-standing reputation and track record for facilitating high standards of practice and providing educational resources to veterinary teams, including guidelines for practice excellence and an annual conference. Over the years, the AAFP has encouraged veterinary professionals to continuously re-evaluate preconceived notions of practice strategies in an effort to advance the quality of feline medicine practiced. Launched in 2012, the Cat Friendly Practice® (CFP) program (catvets.com) was created to improve the treatment, handling, and overall healthcare provided to cats. Its purpose is to provide veterinary practices with the tools and resources to reduce stress associated with the visit and elevate the standard of care provided to cats. With the belief that cat caregivers are instrumental to feline health and welfare, in 2017, the AAFP launched catfriendly.com, a consumer-focused reliable educational resource.

About the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
The Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery is the official journal of the AAFP and the ISFM and is published in partnership with SAGE. All AAFP and ISFM and guidelines are free to access and download from guidelines.jfms.com.

 

The latest in cat calming products is here: Felisept® Home Comfort, the fastest growing cat calming products in Europe is now available in the United States!

Stress can be a very real and very common problem, even for the most pampered felines. Whether it’s a visit to the vet, new furniture, other nearby animals, or fireworks, any change to a cat’s environment can swiftly lead to a variety of distressing behaviors.

Depending on the cat and the cause, this can mean scratching, lashing out at other animals or people, persistent meowing, spraying, or even refusing to use the litterbox.

Felisept Home Comfort offers relief for the whole family: relief for cats from feeling stressed or anxious, and relief for the rest of the household from the reactive behaviors that can be destructive and disrupt household harmony.

Unlike many other calming products marketed for cats, Felisept® Home Comfort uses an extract of Nepeta cataria—commonly known as catnip or catmint—in its approach to helping cat households. Designed to reduce stress-related behaviors, it naturally soothes and calms felines without the use of man-made chemical pheromones.

Felisept is available in the U.S. in two convenient formulas: a fast-acting Calming Spray great for short term relief when traveling and spot use in key areas throughout the home, and a plug-in diffuser designed for long lasting use at-home and coverage of entire rooms.

The products are currently available nationwide through Amazon.com and in the Midwest through Feeders Supply and Petland stores, with other locations soon to come.

For more information about this innovative new cat calming product, please visit www.felisept.com.

The latest in cat calming products is here: Felisept® Home Comfort, popular across Europe and now available in the United States, is the ultimate in cat-calming care.

Unlike many other calming products marketed for cats, Felisept uses an extract of Nepeta cataria—commonly known as catnip or catmint—in its approach to helping cat households. Designed to reduce stress-related behaviors, it naturally soothes and calms distressed felines without the use of man-made chemical pheromones.

Whether caused by vet visits, new furniture, other pets, fireworks, or other common environmental changes, a cat’s reaction to stress can affect all human and animal members of the household, and can even be physically damaging to the home and furniture.

Cats may show their distress through scratching, lashing out at other animals or people, persistent meowing, spraying, or even going outside of the litterbox.

Ultimately, Felisept offers relief for the whole family: for cats, relief from feeling stressed or anxious, and for their parents, relief from the resulting behaviors that can be destructive and disrupt household harmony.

Felisept® Home Comfort is available as a fast-acting spray great for traveling and spot use in key areas, and as a plug-in diffuser for home use and coverage of full rooms. The products will soon be available at Amazon.com and independent pet retailers throughout the United States. To learn more, visit www.felisept.com.

Panthera Launches Epic ‘Journey of the Jaguar’ Expedition to Secure a Future for the Americas' Largest Wild Cat

World’s foremost jaguar scientists make first-ever attempt to traverse, protect the Jaguar Corridor in three-year, ten nation odyssey across Latin America

July 24, 2017

New York, NY – Panthera, the only organization dedicated to conserving the world’s 40 wild cat species, today launched the Journey of the Jaguar – a three-year, ten-nation odyssey from Mexico to Argentina that seeks to secure a future for the Americas’ largest wild cat.

Sixteen years after first identifying the Jaguar Corridor, Panthera CEO Dr. Alan Rabinowitz, accompanied by Jaguar Program Executive Director Dr. Howard Quigley, will lead the first-ever attempt by man to traverse this six million km2 landscape with the singular mission of accelerating progress to protect it. With Panthera’s scientists and partners, they will assess the state of the jaguar, the integrity of its wild landscapes, and the areas most in need of conservation attention throughout its range.

Shining a light on the importance of the jaguar to ecosystems, economies, and cultures across its range, Drs. Rabinowitz and Quigley will traverse Latin America’s wild landscapes in a race against time to move governments, corporations and communities to take decisive steps to save the jaguar and the incredible diversity of plants and animals, including people, that depend on its survival.

Panthera CEO Dr. Rabinowitz stated, “The Jaguar Corridor exists today because the jaguar shaped it and owned it, overcoming all obstacles that stood in its way. Although human beings are relative latecomers to the story of the jaguar, they are the crucial determinant in what comes next for the species.”

Embarking this week on the first official expedition of the Journey of the Jaguar, Drs. Rabinowitz and Quigley have joined Northern South America Jaguar Program Director, Dr. Esteban Payán, in northern Colombia to explore the nearly impassable Darien gap where Colombia meets Panama; conservation challenges and opportunities that exist in Urabá, home to Colombia’s mangrove saltwater-dwelling jaguars; and the San Lucas Forest, the critical link connecting jaguars in Central and South America.

Stopping off at Panthera’s conflict mitigation model ranches, the team will also visit the site where Panthera captured the first ever photos of a wild jaguar with cubs in an oil palm plantation, underscoring the significance of building sustainable agricultural plots that minimize impacts on migrating wildlife.

Creating refugees out of wild cats, habitat loss and fragmentation caused by human developments like oil palm monocultures is one of the greatest threats facing jaguars, alongside killings in retaliation for livestock depredation and overhunting of prey species. Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative seeks to connect and protect the mosaic of human-dominated landscapes from Mexico to Argentina that are vital to maintaining the genetic diversity and survival of the species. Cupped between Panama to the north and a handful of South American countries, Colombia holds the key to the jaguar’s passage from Central America to South America.

Dr. Payán stated, “The launch of the Journey of the Jaguar in Colombia is critically timed, as the country embarks on a new era of peace. As formerly unoccupied territories open up for conservation and ecotourism development, Colombia holds outstanding potential to further unify the nation and its people with a new focus on building peace with biodiversity. Protecting Colombia’s tremendous wild places and wildlife, including jaguars, is part and parcel of protecting the future of the people of Colombia.”

Just in time for the latest expedition, Panthera today launched a new, interactive Journey of the Jaguar website, allowing users to follow Panthera’s jaguar scientists in real-time, and showcasing the fascinating stories, photos, and videos of the people, wildlife and landscapes the team encounters along the way.

Timed with the launch of a new conservation program in Mexico earlier this year, the first Journey of the Jaguar expedition explored Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula, home to part of the country’s largest jaguar population. In April, Panthera’s scientists embarked on the second journey, traveling on foot and by mule from southeastern Arizona into Sonora and Sinaloa to assess the Northern Corridor’s unique threats and greatest conservation needs.

Dr. Quigley stated, “Securing the future of the jaguar has been a lifelong mission of mine as a scientist, and I’m excited to continue this adventure through the launch of the Journey of the Jaguar. As the survival of many big cats and other wildlife around the globe grows ever more tenuous, with faith in their future burning out, I’m encouraged by the resilience of the jaguar - a big cat for which hope still shines bright.”

Visit journeyofthejaguar.org to learn more.

About Panthera 
Panthera, founded in 2006, is devoted exclusively to preserving wild cats and their critical role in the world’s ecosystems. Panthera’s team of leading biologists, law enforcement experts and wild cat advocates develop innovative strategies based on the best available science to protect cheetahs, jaguars, leopards, lions, pumas, snow leopards and tigers and their vast landscapes. In 36 countries around the world, Panthera works with a wide variety of stakeholders to reduce or eliminate the most pressing threats to wild cats—securing their future, and ours. Visit Panthera.org

About the Jaguar Corridor Initiative
Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative is the only conservation program to date which seeks to protect jaguars across their entire six million km2 range. In partnership with governments, corporations and local communities, Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative is working to preserve the genetic integrity of the jaguar by connecting and protecting core jaguar populations in human landscapes from northern Mexico to northern Argentina. Learn more.

 

Scientists at the Baker Institute for Animal Health at Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine have developed a model system that can be used to test drugs for treating feline herpes virus 1 (FHV-1). Early results have pointed to a new drug for treating FHV-1. The work is reported in the Journal of General Virology.

“Herpes-induced cornea infections are a big problem in cats” and can lead to blindness if untreated, says Dr. Gerlinde Van de Walle, who led the study. “We wanted to develop a model system that could predict whether an antiviral drug would work against FHV-1 in cats.”

Her team was also searching for an easy way to identify drugs that could be given just once a day. As vets and many owners know, smearing ointment in a cat’s eyes might be easy the first time, but she will most likely hide or fight subsequent applications.

The new model used donated corneas from cats that died of causes other than eye disease. It offers a better reflection of what happens in the eyes of a cat than models consisting of a single layer of cells in a petri dish; and a better prediction of what to expect in a living animal.

The team applied the FHV-1 virus to some of the corneas and tested the effectiveness of two commonly-prescribed drugs: cidofovir and acyclovir. Both drugs cleared the infection when applied every 12 hours, but cidofovir was more effective.

They then used the model system to evaluate the antiretroviral drug raltegravir, which is commonly used to treat HIV infections in humans. Although some reports indicated it could be effective against human herpes viruses, raltegravir had never been used to treat FHV-1 in cats before.

“We found that it is very effective against FHV-1. It even worked when we applied the drug only once every 24 hours,” says Van de Walle. This means raltegravir could be just as effective as other drugs for treating FHV-1 infections, but would only have to be administered once daily. Van de Walle says she hopes eventually to see the drug tested in a well-controlled clinical trial.

The research was supported by the Cornell Feline Health Center.