Displaying items by tag: farm

This is a book about animals on what can be considered a small farm, the title character is the runt of a group of fourteen newly acquired chicks. On this farm, the animals are considered to be part of the family and all of them have their own names. The attitudes of the chickens are developed with this in mind,,although they have distinct personalities. Once the chicks are large enough to be safer from predators, they are allowed to roam freely, at this time “Bodo,” a Hungarian bird dog, takes over as their protector. There are also horses on this farm and they easily converse with the chickens. The horses are valuable show horse’s and some have traveled all the way to Europe to compete. When they are told that the horses wear blankets and other fashion accessories, the chickens are jealous and express a desire to also be dressed up. The entire farm is presented as a happy family, where all of the animals communicate with each other, yet the humans appear to be oblivious to this. That does not diminish this excellent story about animals of different species that form a society. The story is filled with life lesson’s such as sharing, trust, friendships , love, being yourself and proud of it and simple life pleasures such as splashing in puddles .

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Whimsical Farm Animals Form Lasting Friendships In A Runtamuffin Tale
West Palm Beach, FL ― Life’s a real zoo at Legacy Farms, where 14 chickens, a couple of dogs and an assortment of horses with diverse temperaments learn to share their days on the sprawling homestead.
Based on the true life adventures of author Melissa Taylor’s charming chickens, A Runtamuffin Tale is a delightful new children’s book that follows the life of Runtamuffin — or Runti — a tiny chicken with a big personality. Runti becomes the first chicken brave enough to form a bond with one of the farm’s largest inhabitants — a beautiful horse named Mariett.
All the animals on the farm soon learn that differences in size and outward appearances don’t mean a thing in this colorful tale that subtly interweaves valuable life lessons on sharing, believing in yourself, love, friendship, anti-bullying and mutual respect.
The 57-page book, wonderfully illustrated by Marc Beauregard, targets children ages 6 to 12 and would make a treasured addition to any family’s home or elementary school library.
Author Melissa Taylor was born and raised in the small town of Nazareth, Pennsylvania. Melissa’s mom filled her childhood home with animals, which cultivated Melissa’s love and desire to surround herself with all types of four- and two-legged creatures. She currently lives, owns and runs a farm with her husband in South Florida with 14 chickens, 34 horses, 5 dogs and a cockatiel. For more information about Melissa and her children’s book, please visit: www.runtavision.com.
A Runtamuffin Tale Release date: 2017 ISBN: 978-0-9989887-0-2 Hardcover and digital download available from www.runtavision.com.
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Excerpt from Kirkus Review: “Whatever their temporary differences, the farm is a little family where everyone has fun. In her debut, Taylor provides warm scenarios of friendship, growing trust, and simple pleasures, such as splashing in puddles.”

 

A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, NOW IN TRADE PAPERBACK!
ESTHER THE WONDER PIG
• Maple Smoked Rice Paper Bacon (NEW!)
• Alfredo Sauce (NEW!)
• Cashew Dill Cheese
• Nutty Chocolate Ice Cream Bars
• Esther-Approved Cherry Cheesecake
• A Conversation With Steve & Derek (NEW!)
Grand Central Publishing is proud to present the New York Times Bestseller, ESTHER THE WONDER
PIG: Changing the World One Heart at a Time by Steve Jenkins and Derek Walter, with Caprice
Crane in trade paperback on May 30, 2017 — with two new Esther-Approved recipes and a Conversation
with Steve and Derek!
ESTHER THE WONDER PIG shares the heartwarming story of this titular social media superstar and
friend to all, and of how loving families really do come in all shapes and sizes. Esther has won the hearts
of people from many walks of life, amassing—with her parents’ love and support—over 1 million followers
across social media (and growing!) She is now declared a Global Influencer on Facebook in a special
partnership with the mega platform.
In the summer of 2012, Steve Jenkins was contacted by an old friend about adopting a micro piglet.
Though he knew his partner Derek wouldn’t be enthusiastic, he agreed to take the adorable little animal,
thinking he could care for her himself. Little did he know how that decision would change his and Derek’s
lives forever. It turned out that there was nothing “micro” about Esther, and Steve and Derek had actually
signed on to raise a full-sized commercial pig. Tiny Esther weighed just four pounds back then, but is now
a whopping 650 pounds. Esther quickly outgrew their small home—but not without some real growing
pains and a lot of messes. Esther voices her opinions, and boy does she have opinions!
When it became clear that Esther needed more space—and a lot of it—Steve and Derek made another
life-changing decision: they bought a farm and opened the Happily Ever Esther Farm Sanctuary, where
they could care for Esther once she was full-grown and for other animals like her, in need of a safe haven
when there usually is none for them. The couple continues to rescue and rehabilitate abandoned and
abused farm animals there. Esther shares her life on the farm with lovable pigs, cows, birds, goats, donkeys,
horses, sheep, rabbits, and other canine and feline siblings!
Funny, heartwarming, and truly charming, ESTHER THE WONDER PIG follows Steve and Derek’s adventure
from reluctant pig parents to farm-owning advocates for animals. Esther is a true phenomenon with
an inspiring, love-filled message for the world.
Peace, Love & Esther!
 

ABOUT THE AUTHORS
In just three short years, Steve and Derek have cemented a place for themselves among the world’s
most wellknown and successful animal activists, accumulating hundreds of thousands of followers from
all over the globe. In 2014, Steve and Derek founded the Happily Ever Esther Farm Sanctuary in Campbellville,
Ontario, where they continue to rescue and rehabilitate abandoned and abused farmed animals.
Caprice Crane is an award-winning, internationally bestselling, five-time novelist, screenwriter, and
television writer. Caprice’s humor and satirical observations have earned her a wildly loyal social media
following and the distinction as one of the Huffington Post’s “50 Funny People You Should Be Following
on Twitter.”
“First, Jenkins and Walter opened their hearts to one very special pig, and now they are opening their
doors and letting us in, too. ESTHER THE WONDER PIG is a tender, funny story that manages to sneak
up behind you when you’re least expecting it and change your life. Be prepared to fall in love—with a pig.”
—Jasmin Singer, author of Always Too Much and Never Enough: A Memoir and co-host of Our Hen House
“Told with self-effacing humor and a sense of wonder at what life can bring, ESTHER is the story of
the transformative power of love between people and animals and how the decision to try to make a difference
on a personal level can effect positive change far beyond anything that might have been imagined.”
—Larry Levin, New York Times bestselling author of Oogy: The Dog Only a Family Could Love
“Steve and Derek show us what we already know at Mercy for Animals-that farmed animals are just as
deserving of love and respect as the dogs and cats we share our home with-or, in their case, the pig they
share their home with.”
—Nathan Runkle, founder & president, Mercy for Animals
“An inspirational, enjoyable read, especially for animal lovers.”
—Booklist
“Written in a sincere, touching, and often quite funny voice, ESTHER THE WONDER PIG is a balm to
the soul . . . So far, definitely my favorite read of 2016.”
—Have Cake, Will Travel
“Funny, entertaining, enlightening, and touching, this book about an unknowingly influential little piggy is
a good read that also provides an education on the intelligence of pigs and their capacity for giving and
receiving affection.”―
—Publishers Weekly (STARRED REVIEW)
 

Review written by Jon Patch with 3.5 out of 4 paws

Hell or High Water

CBS Films, Oddlot Entertainment, Film 44 and Sidney Kimmel Entertainment present an R rated, 102 minute, Crime, Drama, directed by David Mackenzie and screenplay by Taylor Sheridan with a theater release date of August 12, 2016.

Animal activists protest slaughterhouses throughout North America for World Day for Farmed Animals

Bethesda, Md. - Beginning this weekend, there will be a coordinated, targeted series of demonstrations at slaughterhouses and other animal agriculture facilities around the world headed by national nonprofit group Farm Animal Rights Movement (FARM), one of the nation's oldest and most established animal advocacy organizations.

The events are held to observe World Day for Farmed Animals, during which activists around the world gather peacefully to respect and memorialize the 65 billion land animals killed for food every year. World Day For Farmed Animals, now in its 30th year, was established by FARM in 1983.

Protests and events will be held in more than 100 U.S. cities including Washington, DC at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's building, and at slaughterhouses in Brooklyn NY, Chicago IL, Los Angeles CA, Milwaukee WI, Milford DE, Phoenix AZ, and San Diego CA. In Canada, FARM is organizing protests in Vancouver BC, Toronto ON, Burlington ON, Maidstone ON, Breslau ON, and Lethbridge AB. FARM demonstrations are scheduled in several other countries, including England, Spain, Chile, India, and Israel.

"Farmed animals are confined, mutilated, and bred to grow so large, so quickly, that many of them literally suffer to death," said Michael Webermann, FARM executive director. "Each year, World Day for Farmed Animals seeks to expose the public to the shocking truth of animal agribusiness, and has become an international movement to take action on behalf of these innocent animals."

The international day of action typically includes vigils, marches, and demonstrations, and takes place each year on or around October 2 in conjunction with the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, an outspoken advocate of non-violence towards animals.

"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way in which its animals are treated," Gandhi famously said. For more information please visit www.DayForAnimals.org.


About FARM
Farm Animal Rights Movement (FARM) is a 501(c)(3) national nonprofit organization working to end the use of animals for food through public education and grassroots activism. FARM believes in the inherent self-worth of animals, as well as environmental protection and enhanced public health. The organization is based in Bethesda, Md., and works through a volunteer network in all 50 U.S. states and two dozen other countries. For more than 30 years, as FARM has grown, so has public awareness of farmed animal abuse and the benefits of veganism. For more information please visit http://www.farmusa.org.

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New Worldwatch Institute study examines the

agricultural sector's impact on global greenhouse gas emissions

Washington, D.C.---Global greenhouse gas emissions from the agricultural sector totaled 4.69 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent in 2010 (the most recent year for which data are available), an increase of 13 percent over 1990 emissions. By comparison, global carbon dioxide emissions from transport totaled 6.76 billion tons that year, and emissions from electricity and heat production reached 12.48 billion tons, according to Worldwatch Institute's Vital Signs Online service (www.worldwatch.org).

 

Growth in agricultural production between 1990 and 2010 outpaced growth in emissions by a factor of 1.6, demonstrating increased energy efficiency in the agriculture sector.

 

The three most common gases emitted in agriculture are nitrous oxide, CO2, and methane. Methane is generally produced when organic materials----such as crops, livestock feed, or manure----decompose anaerobically (without oxygen). Methane accounts for around 50 percent of total agricultural emissions. Enteric fermentation----the digestion of organic materials by livestock----is the largest source of methane emissions and of agricultural emissions overall.

Nitrous oxide is a by-product generated by the microbial breakdown of nitrogen in soils and manures. Nitrous oxide production is particularly high in cases where the nitrogen available in soils exceeds that required by plants to grow, which often occurs when nitrogen-rich synthetic fertilizers are applied. Nitrous oxide is responsible for around 36 percent of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions.

Finally, carbon dioxide is released from soils when organic matter decomposes aerobically (with oxygen). The largest source of CO2 emissions within agriculture is the drainage and cultivation of "organic soils"----soils in wetlands, peatlands, bogs, or fens with high organic material. When these areas are drained for cultivation, organic matter within the soil decomposes at a rapid rate, releasing CO2. This process accounts for around 14 percent of total agricultural greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Emissions from enteric fermentation rose by 7.6 percent worldwide between 1990 and 2010, but regional variation was high. At 51.4 percent and 28.1 percent, respectively, Africa and Asia saw their emissions increase, while emissions in Europe and Oceania fell by 48.1 percent and 16.1 percent. Europe's significant reduction in emissions parallels the decline in its beef production between 1990 and 2010, but it may also reflect increased use of grains and oils in cattle feed instead of grasses.

"Adding oils or oilseeds to feed can help with digestion and reduce methane emissions. But a shift from a grass-based to a grain- and oilseeds-based diet often accompanies a shift from pastures to concentrated feedlots, which has a range of negative consequences such as water pollution and high fossil fuel consumption," said Laura Reynolds, Worldwatch Food and Agriculture Researcher and the study's author. "Aside from reducing livestock populations, there is no other clear pathway to climate-friendly meat production from livestock."

Manure that is deposited and left on pastures contributes to global nitrous oxide emissions because of its high nitrogen content. When more nitrogen is added to soil than is needed, soil bacteria convert the extra nitrogen into nitrous oxide and emit it into the atmosphere----a process called nitrification. Emissions from manure on pasture were highest in Asia, Africa, and South America, accounting for a combined 81 percent of global emissions from this source.

These data indicate the huge share of global emissions that is attributable to livestock production. While reducing livestock populations is one way to reduce global emissions from agriculture, farmers and landowners have numerous other opportunities for mitigation, many of which offer environmental and even economic co-benefits. For instance, growing trees and woody perennials on land can sequester carbon while simultaneously helping to restore soils, reduce water contamination, and provide beneficial wildlife habitat. Reducing soil tillage can rebuild soils while lowering greenhouse gas emissions. Some practices can even result in increased income for farmers----"cap-and-trade" programs allow farmers to monetize certain sequestration practices and sell them, while government programs like the U.S. Conservation Reserve Program pay farmers to set aside some of their land for long-term restoration.

Further highlights from the report:

  • Enteric fermentation accounted for 29 percent of emissions in both North America and Asia in 2010----the lowest share of all regions----but was the source of 61 percent of South America's agricultural emissions, reflecting that continent's world leadership in cattle production.
  • Rice cultivation was responsible for 17 percent of Asia's total emissions in 2010 but no more than 3 percent of emissions in every other region----indicating Asia's dominance of global rice output.
  • Four out of the top five countries with the highest emissions from cultivated organic soils were in Asia: Indonesia contributed 278.7 million tons of carbon dioxide from this source, Papua New Guinea 40.8 million tons, Malaysia 34.5 million tons, and Bangladesh 30.6 million tons----indicating the levels of deforestation and clearing for agricultural land.

About the Worldwatch Institute:

Worldwatch is an independent research organization based in Washington, D.C. that works on energy, resource, and environmental issues. The Institute's State of the World report is published annually in more than a dozen languages. For more information, visit www.worldwatch.org.

 

About Vital Signs Online:

Vital Signs Online provides business leaders, policymakers, and engaged citizens with the latest data and analysis they need to understand critical global trends. It is an interactive, subscription-based tool that provides hard data and research-based insights on the sustainability trends that are shaping our future. All of the trends include clear analysis and are placed in historical perspective, allowing you to see where the trend has come from and where it might be headed. New trends cover emerging hot topics-from global carbon emissions to green jobs-while trend updates provide the latest data and analysis for the fastest changing and most important trends today. Every trend includes full datasets and complete referencing. Click here to subscribe today to Vital Signs Online.

 

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(SCHAUMBURG, Illinois) August 22, 2012—The AVMA strongly condemns recently released video showing the inhumane treatment of cows at a California slaughterhouse and is calling for stricter adherence to humane animal handling guidelines and standards.

The AVMA labeled the abuse, which includes cows being pulled by their tails, kicked, and repeatedly shocked, as indefensible and deplorable.

“Once again, we are confronted with video showing unacceptable and inhumane treatment of livestock by those responsible for their care,” said Dr. Ron DeHaven, chief executive officer of the AVMA. “We hope that those responsible are brought to justice, and that their punishment will serve as a reminder that this type of abuse will not be tolerated by either veterinarians or the American public.”

The undercover video, taped in June at Central Valley Meat Co. in Hanford, Calif., was shot by an animal rights group. Officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture suspended operations at the facility on Monday, and the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is conducting an investigation into the allegations.

In addition to investigating the inhumane and improper handling of cattle by facility employees, and the potential food safety risks associated with that handling, the AVMA urges the USDA to investigate whether or not the USDA-FSIS inspectors at the facility were providing adequate oversight. Anyone complicit in this unacceptable treatment of animals needs to be held accountable.

Dr. Gail Golab, director of the AVMA’s Animal Welfare Division, emphasized the association’s zero-tolerance approach toward animal cruelty.

“People working with animals have a responsibility to ensure they are treated humanely; this includes workers on the floor as well as management in the corner office,” Dr. Golab said. “They also have a responsibility to stop—and prevent—this type of cruelty toward animals.

“Animal welfare is an AVMA priority, and we have worked hard to encourage the use of sound animal care practices in all types of facilities. Good animal care means making sure that animals are cared for and handled appropriately at all times. The AVMA simply will not tolerate bad behavior toward animals,” Dr. Golab said.

The AVMA urges law enforcement authorities to conduct a thorough investigation and to prosecute those responsible to the fullest extent of the law.

The AVMA has long-standing policies addressing the appropriate care and handling of animals used for agricultural production. They are available for review at https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Reference/AnimalWelfare/Pages/Animal-Welfare-Policy-statements.aspx.

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The AVMA and its more than 82,500 member veterinarians are engaged in a wide variety of activities dedicated to advancing the science and art of animal, human and public health. Visit the AVMA Web site at www.avma.org for more information.