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RALEIGH, NC (November 5, 2019) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) announces another year of growth in grants awarded for canine health research.  In 2019, CHF has awarded 46 new research grants totaling over $2.8 million to benefit canine health. CHF currently manages 135 active grants representing funding of more than $10.8 million, bringing their total funding to $52.9 million for canine health research and educational programs. Outcomes from this funding have resulted in more than 775 publications in peer-reviewed journals since their founding in 1995.In addition to addressing overall health concerns for all dogs, CHF’s ongoing hemangiosarcoma, tick-borne disease, and epilepsy research initiatives provided expanded funding opportunities for these important diseases during 2019. CHF and their donors continued funding for new educational grants to support the American Kennel Club/AKC Canine Health Foundation/Theriogenology Foundation Small Animal Theriogenology Residency Program, and their Clinician-Scientist Fellowship Program.As part of the educational outreach component of their mission, CHF sponsored five webinars by CHF-funded investigators on topics such as CBD oil use for dogs, updates on canine influenza, canine degenerative myelopathy, early maternal influences on puppies being raised as service dogs, and discussion of spay/neuter on overall health, providing continuing education for veterinary professionals, dog owners, and breeders. Also, CHF hosted the National Parent Club Canine Health Conference in St. Louis, MO in August. The biennial event, sponsored by Purina, brought together researchers, American Kennel Club (AKC) Parent Club members, breeders, veterinarians, veterinary residents, and veterinary students to discuss the latest findings in canine health research.“We are honored to collaborate with the best scientists, breeders, veterinarians and dog lovers to achieve better health for all dogs,” states CHF CEO, Dr. Diane Brown. “As we enter our 25th year in 2020, we look forward to creating more opportunities to advance canine health research."CHF earned a highest four-star rating from Charity Navigator again this year and maintained its platinum rating from GuideStar, demonstrating programs excellence and that it exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, accountability and transparency, and outperforms most charities in its category.Matched funding opportunities provided a means for CHF donors to double their impact on canine health in 2019. The AKC continues to match donations from new and lapsed donors and the American German Shepherd Dog Charitable Foundation is matching donations for hemangiosarcoma research.With gratitude for their donors’ support, CHF continues to achieve its mission to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding humane scientific research and supporting the dissemination of health information to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Donation information can be found at akcchf.org/donate.

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About CHF

Since 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science to address the health needs of all dogs. With more than $52 million in funding to date, the Foundation provides grants for the highest quality canine health research and shares information on the discoveries that help prevent, treat and cure canine diseases. The Foundation meets and exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, as demonstrated by their highest four-star Charity Navigator rating and GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency. Learn more at www.akcchf.org.


 
Judging Panel Announced for Westminster Week's
Four Competitions Held in New York City
 
New York, N.Y. - Mrs. Betty-Anne Stenmark of Woodside, California has been chosen to select the Best in Show winner at the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, which will take place Feb. 12-13, 2018. Mrs. Stenmark is a breeder, owner, and long-time dog club officer. She will join the elite list of judges who have presided over best in show at Westminster, "America's Dog Show."
 
Mrs. Stenmark has dedicated a lifetime to the sport of dogs as an exhibitor, breeder, canine advocate, judge and dog club show chairman. In 1967, she exhibited a Saint Bernard at her first dog show in Vancouver, British Columbia. After breeding Saint Bernards and Salukis, she was charmed by the unique qualities of the Dandie Dinmont Terrier and for the past 41 years, she has continued in that breed under the King's Mtn. prefix.
 
In 1977, Mrs. Stenmark earned her AKC-license to judge Saint Bernards. Currently she is licensed to judge all breeds in the Sporting, Hound, and Terrier groups, 12 breeds from the Working group, Cardigan Welsh Corgis and Pembroke Welsh Corgis from the Herding group, and Best in Show.
 
In 1980, she was instrumental in the establishment of the Del Valle Dog Club of Livermore, California, which has since grown to attract one of the largest entries on the West Coast. Mrs. Stenmark recently retired as show chairman of the Del Valle Dog Club, after serving in that capacity for 70 consecutive events.
 
As a purebred dog advocate, in 1990 Mrs. Stenmark co-founded Responsible Dog Breeders of San Mateo County. The group successfully overturned restrictive breeding legislation and was later granted American Kennel Club (AKC) club recognition as Skyline Dog Fanciers.
 
In addition to her all-breed dog club involvement, Mrs. Stenmark has held many other positions including President of the Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club of America, board member of the San Mateo County Fair board, board member of Take the Lead, and long-time member of the AKC Trial Board.
 
Her judging career includes receiving the prestigious Dogs in Review Winkie® award, based on voting by her peers, as Judge of the Year in 2011. This is her 11th assignment at Westminster. She previously judged the Hound group in 1998 and 2015 and the Terrier group in 2008.
 
Professionally, Mrs. Stenmark was a partner in the firm Stenmark Metal Specialties, with her late husband, Roy. The firm specialized in seismic motion systems.  In later years, she was the volunteer coordinator at Palo Alto Animal Services. Now retired, Mrs. Stenmark lives with her husband, Ben, along with four Dandie Dinmont Terriers.    
 
Mrs. Stenmark will be awarding the Best in Show ribbon to one of the seven group-winning dogs sent to her by a panel of esteemed group judges. The group judging held at Madison Square Garden the evening of Monday, Feb. 12th will be officiated by Mr. Jeffrey G. Pepper of Boynton Beach, Florida for the Hound group; Mr. David J. Kirkland of Sanford, North Carolina for the Toy group; Ms. Mary A. Miller of Lexington, Kentucky for the Non-Sporting group; and Mr. Robert L. Vandiver of Simpsonville, South Carolina, for the Herding group.
 
On Tuesday, Feb. 13th the group judges will be Ms. Elizabeth Sweigart of Bowmansville, Pennsylvania for the Sporting group; Mr. Robert H. Slay of Cary, North Carolina for the Working group; and Mrs. Rosalind Kramer of Leesburg, Virginia for the Terrier group.
 
For the 85th year, a Best Junior Handler will be awarded at Westminster. On Tuesday, Feb. 13th Mr. Clifford W. Steele of Carmel, New York. will select the winner at Madison Square Garden. The eight junior showmanship finalists will be determined in preliminary rounds by Mr. Ken J. Murray of Island Lake, Illinois, and Ms. Gretchen K. Schultz of Bethel Island, California.
 
Presiding over the 5th Annual Masters Agility Championship at Westminster on Saturday, Feb. 10th will be Mr. Don Farage of Bartlett, Tennessee and Mr. David Powell of Auzielle, Occitanie, France.
 
Mr. John Cox of Shoreline, Washington will determine the winner of the 3rd Annual Masters Obedience Championship at Westminster on Monday, Feb. 12th.
 
All daytime preliminary breed and junior showmanship judging, agility and obedience competitions will be held at Piers 92 and 94 on the West Side of Manhattan. The group, best in show and junior showmanship finals judging will be held at Madison Square Garden in the evening. All Westminster Week events are presented by Purina Pro Plan®.
 
The judging panel for the Best of Breed or Variety competitions held at Piers 92/94 in New York City on Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 12 and 13, 2018 includes:
(Pending American Kennel Club approval)
 
SPORTING BREEDS (32)
 
Mr. Paul Campanella of East Hampton, NY: Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers.
 
Mr. Stephen Dainard of Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada: American Water Spaniels, Boykin Spaniels, Clumber Spaniels, Cocker Spaniels (all Varieties), English Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels, Field Spaniels, Sussex Spaniels.
 
Ms. Pluis Davern of Royal Oaks, CA: Flat-Coated Retrievers, Irish Red and White Setters, Irish Water Spaniels, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers, Vizslas, Weimaraners, Wirehaired Pointing Griffons, Wirehaired Vizslas.
 
Mr. Robert D. Ennis of Blasdell, NY: Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Curly-Coated Retrievers, German Shorthaired Pointers, German Wirehaired Pointers, Pointers, Lagotti Romagnolo, Welsh Springer Spaniels.
 
Ms. Gretchen K. Schultz of Bethel Island, CA: English Setters, Gordon Setters, Irish Setters.
 
Mrs. Faye Strauss of Kent, Wash.: Brittanys, Spinoni Italiani.
 
HOUND BREEDS (33) 
 
Mr. Johan Beccera-Hernandez of San Juan, Puerto Rico: Borzois, Greyhounds, Ibizan Hounds, Irish Wolfhounds, Pharaoh Hounds, Salukis, Scottish Deerhounds, Sloughis, Whippets.
 
Mr. Edd Bivin of Fort Worth, TX: Dachshunds (all Varieties).
 
Mrs. Pamela Bruce of Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Basenjis, Basset Hounds, Beagles (both Varieties), Harriers, Rhodesian Ridgebacks.
 
Ms. Linda C. More of Cary, NC: American English Coonhounds, Bloodhounds, Cirnechi dell'Etna, Otterhounds, Petit Basset Griffon Vendeens, Portuguese Podengo Pequenos.
 
Mr. Ken Murray of Island Lake, IL: American Foxhounds, Black and Tan Coonhounds, Bluetick Coonhounds, English Foxhounds, Norwegian Elkhounds, Plotts, Redbone Coonhounds, Treeing Walker Coonhounds.
 
Mrs. Abbe Shaw of Santa Barbara, CA: Afghan Hounds.
 
WORKING BREEDS (30)
 
Mr. Johan Beccera-Hernandez of San Juan, Puerto Rico: Akitas, Alaskan Malamutes, Anatolian Shepherd Dogs, Boxers, Great Danes, Mastiffs, Neapolitan Mastiffs, Tibetan Mastiffs.
 
Mr. Clay Coady of Paradise Valley, AZ: Bernese Mountain Dogs, Bullmastiffs.
 
Mr. Milan Lint of New York, NY: Newfoundlands, Portuguese Water Dogs.
 
Dr. Elliott L. More of Deerfield, NH: Rottweilers, Saint Bernards, Samoyeds, Siberian Huskies.
 
Mr. Ken Murray of Island Lake, IL: Cane Corsos, Chinooks, Dogues de Bordeaux, German Pinschers, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs, Komondorok, Kuvaszok, Leonbergers, Standard Schnauzers.
 
Mrs. Faye Strauss of Kent, WA: Black Russian Terriers, Boerboels, Doberman Pinschers, Giant Schnauzers, Great Pyrenees.
 
TERRIER BREEDS (32)
 
Mr. Edd Bivin of Fort Worth, TX: American Hairless Terriers, Cairn Terriers, Cesky Terriers, Dandie Dinmont Terriers, Norfolk Terriers, Smooth Fox Terriers and Wire Fox Terriers.
 
Mr. Clay Coady of Paradise Valley, AZ: Airedale Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, Australian Terriers, Bedlington Terriers.
 
Mrs. Betty McDonnell of Mahwah, NJ: Norwich Terriers.
 
Ms. Linda C. More of Cary, NC: Glen of Imaal Terriers, Parson Russell Terriers, Rat Terriers, Russell Terriers, Scottish Terriers, Sealyham Terriers, Skye Terriers, Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers.
 
Mr. Michael Shoreman of Phelpston, Ontario, Canada: Border Terriers, Bull Terriers (both Varieties), Irish Terriers, Kerry Blue Terriers, Lakeland Terriers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers.
 
Mrs. Rosemary Shoreman of Phelpston, Ontario, Canada: Miniature Bull Terriers, Miniature Schnauzers, Standard Manchester Terriers, Welsh Terriers, West Highland White Terriers.
 
TOY BREEDS (23)
 
Mr. Robert D. Ennis of Blasdell, NY: Chihuahuas (both Varieties), Chinese Cresteds, English Toy Spaniels (both Varieties), Shih Tzu, Toy Manchester Terriers, Yorkshire Terriers.
 
Mr. Randy Garren of Apex, NC: Miniature Pinschers, Pekingese, Pomeranians, Toy Poodles.
 
Mr. Michael Shoreman of Phelpston, Ontario, Canada: Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Papillons, Silky Terriers, Toy Fox Terriers.
 
Mrs. Rosemary Shoreman of Phelpston, Ontario, Canada: Affenpinschers, Brussels Griffons, Havanese, Italian Greyhounds, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Pugs.
 
NON-SPORTING BREEDS (21)
 
Mr. Edd Bivin of Fort Worth, TX: French Bulldogs.
 
Mr. Clay Coady of Paradise Valley, AZ: Bulldogs, Lhasa Apsos.
 
Mr. Randy Garren of Apex, NC: Chinese Shar-Pei, Chow Chows, Lowchen, Miniature Poodles, Norwegian Lundehunds, Schipperkes, Shiba Inu, Standard Poodles.
 
Mr. Dennis McCoy of Apex, NC: American Eskimo Dogs, Bichon Frises, Boston Terriers, Keeshonden, Tibetan Terriers, Tibetan Spaniels, Xoloitzcuintlis.
 
Mr. Michael Shoreman of Phelpston, Ontario, Canada: Coton De Tulears, Dalmatians, Finnish Spitz.
 
HERDING BREEDS (31)
 
Mr. Clay Coady of Paradise Valley, AZ: Bouviers des Flandres, German Shepherd Dogs.
 
Mr. Thomas Coen of Great Barrington, MA: Berger Picards, Border Collies, Briards, Canaan Dogs, Collies (both Varieties), Shetland Sheepdogs.
 
Mr. Peter Green of Bowmansville, PA: Australian Cattle Dogs, Bearded Collies, Bergamascos, Cardigan Welsh Corgis, Entlebucher Mountain Dogs, Finnish Lapphunds, Pulik, Pumik, Pyrenean Shepherds, Spanish Water Dogs, Swedish Vallhunds.
 
Ms. Janina Laurin of Danbury, CT: Australian Shepherds, Beaucerons, Belgian Malinois, Belgian Sheepdogs, Belgian Tervuren, Polish Lowland Sheepdogs.
 
Ms. Linda C. More of Cary, NC: Icelandic Sheepdogs, Miniature American Shepherds, Norwegian Buhunds.
 
Mrs. Faye Strauss of Kent, WA: Old English Sheepdogs, Pembroke Welsh Corgis.
 
 
###
 
 
About The Westminster Kennel Club - The Westminster Kennel Club is America's oldest organization dedicated to the sport of purebred dogs.  Established in 1877, Westminster's influence has been felt for more than a century through its famous all-breed, benched dog show held every year at New York City's Madison Square Garden. Today, America's dog show has expanded into Westminster Week which includes the Masters Agility Championship at Westminster and the Masters Obedience Championship at Westminster, both held at Piers 92/94. More than 3,000 dogs from the US and abroad make Westminster Week like no other. Westminster. There's only one. Visit us at: www.westminsterkennelclub.org or follow @WKCDOGS.
 
About Purina Pro Plan - Purina Pro Plan is proud to be the food of choice for 10 of the past 11 Westminster Best in Show winners and 98 of the top 100 AKC All-Breed Champions.* With more than 400 on staff scientists, veterinarians and nutritionists, it is our goal to provide dogs with the nutrition they need to be their absolute best, to help keep them energetic and resilient, and to maintain an ideal body condition, healthy skin and a stunning coat. Because being the best he can be means something different for every dog, our wide range of dry and wet foods and snacks, sold exclusively at pet specialty stores, can be found in 80+ formulas across four specialized categories, formulated for a dog's unique needs. For more information, visit www.proplan.com or follow @ProPlan on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Vine or Google+. The brand is manufactured by Nestle Purina PetCare, which promotes responsible pet care, humane education, community involvement and the positive bond between people and their pets. A premiere global manufacturer of pet products, Nestle Purina PetCare is part of Swiss-based Nestle S.A., a global leader in nutrition, health and wellness.
*The handler or owner of these champions may have received Pro Plan dog food as Purina ambassadors.
 
WESTMINSTER. There's Only One.
 
 
 
 
 
Stay  Connected:
                   
149 Madison Avenue 
Suite 402
   New York, NY 10016
212-213-3165

Gail Miller Bisher is the director of communications for the Westminster Kennel Club.

Bisher has been a media professional for many years and has had life-long involvement in canine sport, getting her start in the sport in Junior Showmanship, where she once won second place at Westminster. She is an AKC-licensed conformation judge and a Canine Good Citizen evaluator.

"As the new ‘face' of the Westminster Kennel Club, I look forward to continuing a legacy of quality and prestige while increasing our brand’s presence and audience size," she said.

"It’s an honor to return to the Westminster in this capacity. It’s an exciting time of transition for this historic organization and I plan to do as any dog handler does: access, improve where needed, and practice teamwork. I believe in the leadership’s vision and I’m eager to start executing it."

To learn more, visit the Westminster Kennel Club website.

 

In 1876, the members of the Westminster Club, then primarily a shooting organization, commissioned one of its early officials, George deForest Grant, to send to England for a Pointer which the members could use for breeding purposes.

He received a photograph of a dog named Don which had won his bench championship in England, through show triumphs at Shifnal, Oswestry, Birmingham, Swansea and Llanelly in 1875, and at Newport and Carmarthen in 1876. Impressed with the pictures of the dog as much as with his show record, the members arranged to import him under the name of “Sensation,” Volume IV of the English Kennel Club Stud Book listing him as “Sensation (formerly Don).”

Sensation

Brought to this country, “Sensation” was promptly registered in the name of the Westminster Kennel Club in Volume I of the stud book of the National American Kennel Club, which subsequently became the American Kennel Club. His entry in that book as Number 1261 shows that he gained his American championship with victories at Baltimore in 1876 and at St. Louis, Boston and Baltimore in 1879. His show career, however, was limited since the primary object in his importation was to strengthen the breeding stock of the club’s members.

A handsome lemon and white dog, with a fine head and especially good body, “Sensation” did much for Pointer breeders in this country. Several artists did pictures of him and one of the head studies appeared on the Westminster catalog in 1878, the second all-breed show given by the club. Except for a gap between 1896 and 1903, “Sensation’s” head appeared on all subsequent catalogues of the Westminster Show through 1935.

In 1935, a steel engraving of “Sensation” was discovered in the collection of prints, engravings and paintings of the well-known sportsman, Harry D. Kirkover, of Camden, South Carolina and New York. He loaned the picture to the Westminster Club to permit its reproduction.

The engraving, by artist J. Wellstood, showed the whole dog, with a light lemon patch on its side, frozen in point. The artist had caught the magnificently bodied dog in marvelous detail. The muscles and even the veins of the legs stood out.

This became the new emblem of the club and appeared on the cover of the show catalog from 1936 through 1979. From 1980-1982, a head study of Sensation was selected once again for the cover, but in 1983 a foil embossed version of the full body engraving appeared on the cover and has been there ever since.

 

In 1877, New York was well on its way to becoming the world’s greatest city. This was the year that a group of sporting gentlemen decided that this would be a good time to hold a dog show in Manhattan. It didn’t take long before the Westminster Kennel Club, following the lead of its home town, would be on its way to becoming the world’s greatest dog show.

westmisterhotelWith its spectacular beginnings and extraordinary growth in the years to follow, the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show was quickly reflecting the growth and success of New York City. As the dog show grew every year, so did the Westminster Kennel Club’s position as the symbol of the purebred dog, with its influence being felt in show rings everywhere, and eventually in millions of television homes across the country. Westminster has become America’s Dog Show.

“Westminster gets its name from a long gone hotel in Manhattan. There, sporting gentlemen used to meet in the bar to drink and lie about their shooting accomplishments. Eventually they formed a club and bought a training area and kennel. They kept their dogs there and hired a trainer.

“They couldn’t agree on the name for their new club. But finally someone suggested that they name it after their favorite bar. The idea was unanimously selected, we imagine, with the hoisting of a dozen drinking arms.”
– Maxwell Riddle, from a newspaper story quoted in “The Dog Show, 125 Years of Westminster” by William Stifel

It was at one of those meetings that the members decided that they would stage a dog show so that they could compare their dogs in a setting away from the field. The First Annual New York Bench Show of Dogs, given under the auspices of the Westminster Kennel Club, was staged in 1877 at Gilmore’s Garden (the forerunner of Madison Square Garden) in New York City, drawing an entry of 1,201 dogs.

The show was such a hit that it was extended to four days from its originally-scheduled three, and drew this coverage from “Forest and Stream” magazine:

“To say that the dog show held in the city last week was a success would but poorly convey an idea of what the result really was. It was a magnificent triumph for the dogs and for the projectors of the show. We question if on any previous occasion has there ever assembled in this city such a number of people at one time, and representing as much of the culture, wealth and fashion of the town.”

rings1877To fully grasp the place in history of the Westminster Kennel Club and its famed annual dog show at Madison Square Garden, consider this:

Westminster pre-dates the invention of the light bulb, the automobile, and the zipper; the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Washington Monument; and manned air flight and the establishment of the World Series. Since Westminster held its first show 127 years ago, there have been 26 men elected president and 12 states have joined the union.

The dog show has outlasted three previous versions of Madison Square Garden, and is currently being staged in MSG IV. It is one of only four events to be held in all four “Gardens.”
The dog show has survived power outages, snowstorms, a national depression, two World Wars and a tugboat strike that threatened to shut down the city, in the process becoming the second longest continuously held sporting event in the country. Only the Kentucky Derby has been staged longer – but by just one year.

Westminster even pre-dates the establishment of the governing body of the sport, the American Kennel Club, by seven years. In fact, in 1877, members of Westminster and members of the Kennel Club of Philadelphia had together adopted a set of show rules and regulations and established a Board of Appeals to oversee these rules. This was the precursor of the American Kennel Club, which was finally created in 1884.

As one might imagine, the history of the club and its show is rich and colorful.

In the early Westminster years, some interesting names showed up in the catalogs. In the first show, there were two Staghounds listed as being from the late General George Custer’s pack, and two Deerhounds that had been bred by the Queen of England. In 1889, the Czar of Russia is listed as the breeder of a Siberian Wolfhound entered, and the following year, one of the entries is a Russian Wolfhound whose listed owner was the Emperor of Germany.

Philanthropist J. P. Morgan made the first of his many appearances at Westminster with his Collies in 1893. Famous American journalist Nelly Bly entered her Maltese at Westminster in 1894, some four years after she made a record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes, racing the record of Phineas Fogg in Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days.

warrenremedyThe most-coveted award in the dog show world, Best In Show at Westminster, was given for the first time in 1907. That year, and for the next two years as well, it went to a Smooth Fox Terrier bitch named Ch. Warren Remedy. She remains the only dog ever to win three times.

Six other dogs have won Best In Show twice, the most recent being the English Springer Spaniel, Ch. Chinoe’s Adamant James in 1971 and 1972.

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (January 18, 2017) – The ever-increasing emergence of new canine DNA tests and testing laboratories has made choosing quality DNA testing providers and the right DNA tests for health and breeding decisions increasingly challenging for many owners, breeders and veterinarians. Working with a wide-spectrum of stakeholders in dog health, the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) "Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs" initiative will provide practical support to address these challenges.

With no existing national or international standards of accreditation, or standardization oversight group, there is a growing need for a reliable third party neutral organization that can provide guidance surrounding test reliability, laboratory quality assurance processes and procedures, test applicability by breed, and provide counseling regarding interpretation and best use of genetic test results. This is needed to support consumer confidence in DNA testing, educate consumers in the use of these tests, utilize these tests effectively as tools to reduce the incidence of inherited disease, and to reduce redundant international efforts. IPFD will work to coordinate and consolidate expertise, as well as ongoing and new work to increase the availability of resources to consumers.

The goal of this new IPFD initiative is to create an open access, searchable and sustainable online resource that will:

  • Catalog information provided voluntarily from commercial test providers for genetic testing in dogs;
  • Describe expertise, quality assurance, activities and resources of the test providers;
  • Host expert panel reviews of genetic tests, their reliability, and applicability;
  • Coordinate a program for standardized proficiency testing and potentially peer review and audit;
  • Collate/assemble existing and new resources for genetic counseling and education; and provide the foundation for future developments.

The initial phase of the initiative is to develop a working prototype of the online resource. Both the prototype and the final output will be hosted on the IPFD’s DogWellNet.com platform. The initiative will be guided by IPFD CEO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and Project Director This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and will be overseen by a multi-stakeholder steering committee set up by the IPFD. Initial funding for the prototype is provided through generous contributions from IPFD Founding Partners, the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA), and the AKC Canine Health Foundation.

 # # #

AKC Canine Health Foundation
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

International Partnership for Dogs
International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) is a non-profit organization, registered in Sweden, and initiated in 2014 by a diverse group of stakeholders in the international dog world. The IPFD mission is to facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of pedigreed dogs and all dogs worldwide. Visit the IPFD online at www.dogwellnet.com for more information.

Orthopedic Foundation for Animals
Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) is a 50 year old non-profit foundation with a specific mission to improve the health and welfare of companion animals through a reduction in the incidence of genetic disease. Visit the OFA online at www.ofa.org for more information.

In 1877, New York was well on its way to becoming the world’s greatest city. This was the year that a group of sporting gentlemen decided that this would be a good time to hold a dog show in Manhattan. It didn’t take long before the Westminster Kennel Club, following the lead of its home town, would be on its way to becoming the world’s greatest dog show.

westmisterhotelWith its spectacular beginnings and extraordinary growth in the years to follow, the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show was quickly reflecting the growth and success of New York City. As the dog show grew every year, so did the Westminster Kennel Club’s position as the symbol of the purebred dog, with its influence being felt in show rings everywhere, and eventually in millions of television homes across the country. Westminster has become America’s Dog Show.

“Westminster gets its name from a long gone hotel in Manhattan. There, sporting gentlemen used to meet in the bar to drink and lie about their shooting accomplishments. Eventually they formed a club and bought a training area and kennel. They kept their dogs there and hired a trainer.

“They couldn’t agree on the name for their new club. But finally someone suggested that they name it after their favorite bar. The idea was unanimously selected, we imagine, with the hoisting of a dozen drinking arms.”
– Maxwell Riddle, from a newspaper story quoted in “The Dog Show, 125 Years of Westminster” by William Stifel

It was at one of those meetings that the members decided that they would stage a dog show so that they could compare their dogs in a setting away from the field. The First Annual New York Bench Show of Dogs, given under the auspices of the Westminster Kennel Club, was staged in 1877 at Gilmore’s Garden (the forerunner of Madison Square Garden) in New York City, drawing an entry of 1,201 dogs.

The show was such a hit that it was extended to four days from its originally-scheduled three, and drew this coverage from “Forest and Stream” magazine:

“To say that the dog show held in the city last week was a success would but poorly convey an idea of what the result really was. It was a magnificent triumph for the dogs and for the projectors of the show. We question if on any previous occasion has there ever assembled in this city such a number of people at one time, and representing as much of the culture, wealth and fashion of the town.”

rings1877To fully grasp the place in history of the Westminster Kennel Club and its famed annual dog show at Madison Square Garden, consider this:

Westminster pre-dates the invention of the light bulb, the automobile, and the zipper; the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Washington Monument; and manned air flight and the establishment of the World Series. Since Westminster held its first show 127 years ago, there have been 26 men elected president and 12 states have joined the union.

The dog show has outlasted three previous versions of Madison Square Garden, and is currently being staged in MSG IV. It is one of only four events to be held in all four “Gardens.”
The dog show has survived power outages, snowstorms, a national depression, two World Wars and a tugboat strike that threatened to shut down the city, in the process becoming the second longest continuously held sporting event in the country. Only the Kentucky Derby has been staged longer – but by just one year.

Westminster even pre-dates the establishment of the governing body of the sport, the American Kennel Club, by seven years. In fact, in 1877, members of Westminster and members of the Kennel Club of Philadelphia had together adopted a set of show rules and regulations and established a Board of Appeals to oversee these rules. This was the precursor of the American Kennel Club, which was finally created in 1884.

As one might imagine, the history of the club and its show is rich and colorful.

In the early Westminster years, some interesting names showed up in the catalogs. In the first show, there were two Staghounds listed as being from the late General George Custer’s pack, and two Deerhounds that had been bred by the Queen of England. In 1889, the Czar of Russia is listed as the breeder of a Siberian Wolfhound entered, and the following year, one of the entries is a Russian Wolfhound whose listed owner was the Emperor of Germany.

Philanthropist J. P. Morgan made the first of his many appearances at Westminster with his Collies in 1893. Famous American journalist Nelly Bly entered her Maltese at Westminster in 1894, some four years after she made a record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes, racing the record of Phineas Fogg in Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days.

warrenremedyThe most-coveted award in the dog show world, Best In Show at Westminster, was given for the first time in 1907. That year, and for the next two years as well, it went to a Smooth Fox Terrier bitch named Ch. Warren Remedy. She remains the only dog ever to win three times.

Six other dogs have won Best In Show twice, the most recent being the English Springer Spaniel, Ch. Chinoe’s Adamant James in 1971 and 1972.

 

Pat Santi, has been a DWAA member for 25 years and secretary for over 17 years. Author, columnist

lecturer, and animal behaviorist for over 40 years. Breeder, owner, handler for 45 years and AKC Breeder of

Merit. I am a registered nurse by profession but animals, especially dogs, been an essential part of my life since childhood:  As.

secretary, I enjoy working for and with the members.

USDA Announces Landmark Rule to Crack Down on Online Puppy Mills

Tens of thousands of dogs suffering in substandard, filthy, and overcrowded cages for years on end will finally get the protection they deserve as a result of a rule the U.S. Department of Agriculture will formally adopt today. This change, a long-held aspiration for The HSUS, the Humane Society Legislative Fund, and the Doris Day Animal League, is decades in the making and will extend federal oversight to thousands of puppy mills that do business online.

Of the dozens of puppy mills that The HSUS has assisted in closing down over the past five years, the vast majority were selling puppies online and escaping any federal oversight because a loophole in federal Animal Welfare Act regulations exempts Internet sellers. Because large-scale dog breeders who sell animals to pet stores are regulated, but breeders who sell directly to the public are not, there has been a massive migration of breeders to the latter sales strategy within the last decade or so. If they could sell dogs and escape any federal oversight, why not get in on that act and continue to cut corners on animal care?

The HSUS, HSLF, and DDAL pointed out that it was fundamentally unfair that people involved in the same underlying business enterprise (breeding dogs to sell for profit) would face entirely different regulatory standards. It was a circumstance ripe for fraud and misrepresentation. Internet sellers of puppies often displayed images of puppies frolicking in open fields. In reality, the dogs were languishing, crammed inside feces-encrusted cages, receiving no protection from the elements and no veterinary care whatever. And until the legal standard was modified, the federal government couldn’t take action because none of these mills required federal licensing and inspection.

Due to pressure from The HSUS and DDAL, the USDA’s inspector general looked into enforcement of the rules governing dog breeding, finding appalling abuses of the dogs, deficient exercise of authority by USDA where it had authority, and identification of this glaring gap in the law that allowed Internet sellers to evade any federal oversight whatever. It was that OIG report, combined with our advocacy efforts in Congress and with the Obama administration that finally compelled federal action.

We thank the Obama administration and the USDA for bringing new standards of care to thousands of puppies, but also to kittens, rabbits and other warm-blooded animals who are often raised in inhumane facilities and sold as pets over the Internet, by mail or by phone, sight-unseen.

The HSUS and HSLF called on supporters to act in 2011, and 32,000 people signed a petition urging the Obama administration to crack down on unregulated puppy mills. When the USDA proposed an actual change in its regulations in 2012, HSUS members and other animal advocates generated 350,000 public signatures and comments in support.

There has been strong bipartisan support in Congress for closing the “Internet loophole” in the Animal Welfare Act regulations. Federal legislation, S. 395 and H.R. 847 – known as the PUPS Act, or "Puppy Uniform Protection and Safety Act" – sponsored by Sens. Dick Durbin, D-Ill. and David Vitter, R-La., and Reps. Jim Gerlach, R-Pa., Sam Farr, D-Calif., Bill Young, R-Fla., and Lois Capps, D-Calif., galvanized members of congress in support of efforts to finalize and implement the rule.

Puppy mills aren’t going away overnight, and it’s still important for any potential puppy buyer to meet the breeder in person at his or her facility to see how and where a puppy was born and raised. But this rule has the potential to allow federal inspectors to peer behind the closed doors of puppy mills and improve the lives of tens of thousands of animals. That is a change worth celebrating, and we thank our supporters, the USDA, and our allies in Congress for supporting this significant step.

 

Melissa Confusing and unpredictable human behavior can cause your dog to act out. Learn how to protect your dog and your liability in today’s world. Imagine your reaction if your child’s friend grabs the remote control of the TV you are watching and changes the channel—and then later, does it again. We instantly recognize this behavior as wrong and correct it. When humans break dog rules and they correct us, we ignore our insubordinate actions and default to “blaming the dog.”Former animal officer Melissa Berryman has witnessed how devastating the effects society’s entrenched beliefs regarding dog behavior and temperament can be—that good behavior can be purchased, that an owner’s handling ability doesn’t matter, that human behavior and the situations in which the dog is placed are insignificant. Berryman shows how analyzing situations and contexts can stop the cycle of preventable incidents. Written with humor and compassion, People Training for Good Dogs offers insight into the impact that human behavior and understanding have on our relationships with dogs. By working with core canine social and behavioral drives, Berryman provides owners with sound techniques that focus on safety and can help protect their liability in today’s world.“This is the new Bible for all dog owners. … It will truly help you have the best relationship with yours and all dogs!” —Katie Riopel, dog trainer and host of Katie K9  Visit www.ptfgd.com to order the book and gt more information

I have been a Rover Reporter and Photographer for The New Barker for the last six years, covering Florida events. I have also covered the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show for as many years, following Florida Dogs and specific handlers with a particular eye on the Junior Handlers.
Owner, Breeder, Handler for over 20 years. I run Celestial Custom Dog Services: In your home dog training, pet sitting, transportation, dogie day care and nutritional advice as well as professional handling for pedigrees for show and confirmation and placement of the right dogs to the right families whether rescue or purchase.

                                                    A New Kind Of Pet-ty Politics

(New York, NY) Every President since President Chester Arthur has had at least one pet in the White House according to the Presidential Pet Museum, and the majority of ‘First Pets’ are dogs. Keryn Rod of Purebred Breeders LLC, says, “When it comes to presidential pet-ty politics, it’s not what the politician says about how much he loves his dog that matters most, but how that dog is a reflection of the man who owns it.”

Rod says, "Men adopt different breeds of dogs for different reasons, however, there are many experts who say the type of dog a man chooses to own says a lot about his character and values." For example, according to Wendy Diamond, author of “What a Lucky Dog”, men who own a German Shepherd are men with classic lifestyles and values whose wild side will mellow with age. Intrigue and mystery are said to get the attention of a man with a German Shepherd.  Rick Santorum, Republican presidential candidate owns a German Shepherd, as did President Herbert Hoover.

The owner of an Irish Setter is said to be very sociable, good-natured, and tends to be a loyal, and affectionate family man. An outgoing, healthy, action oriented outdoorsman tends to choose this dog. Mitt Romney, who continues to be dogged by his 1980s 12-hour car ride to Canada with his Irish Setter in a kennel tied to the roof of his car, said among other defenses, that his dog liked the fresh air. President Richard Nixon also had an Irish Setter.

Newt Gingrich does not appear to own any pets though he has said that when he was a child he had a Doberman Pinscher. Wendy Diamond says if you are looking for marriage material in a man, you should consider the Doberman Pinscher owner. So far, three women have agreed with her when it came to Newt.

Ron Paul’s foray into pet-ty politics came earlier in the campaign when he portrayed himself as a Rottweiler and his opponents as Shih Tzus in a campaign ad accusing the other candidates of being all bark and no bite when it came to cutting government spending.

Rod, of Purebred Breeders LLC says, “It’s a shame that dogs have to be dragged into politics, but with presidential candidates, if you can do your research on the breed, chances are you’ll pick the one that’s right for you.”

Maybe Presidents Hayes and Taft had it right when it came to White House pets. Hayes had the first Siamese kitten in America and Taft was the last to have a cow.

About Purebred Breeders LLC
Purebred Breeders, LLC was founded in 2005 with the mission of connecting healthy and happy purebred puppies with responsible dog owners while providing exceptional customer service and puppy education. Purebred Breeders has a comprehensive breeder screening and health-check process that has allowed it to place puppies with thousands of families over the years.