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The Roar Foundation - The Shambala Preserve, PO Box 189, Acton, CA 93510
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#BackToHogwarts

J.K. Rowling and the cast of Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald reminisce over their favorite Hogwarts memories.

Check out the below featurette celebrating #BackToHogwarts tomorrow, September 1st

YouTube: https://youtu.be/uR2HJMjxErA

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Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald” is the second of five all new adventures in J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World™.

At the end of the first film, the powerful Dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald (Johnny Depp) was captured by MACUSA (Magical Congress of the United States of America), with the help of Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne).  But, making good on his threat, Grindelwald escaped custody and has set about gathering followers, most unsuspecting of his true agenda: to raise pure-blood wizards up to rule over all non-magical beings.

In an effort to thwart Grindelwald’s plans, Albus Dumbledore (Jude Law) enlists his former student Newt Scamander, who agrees to help, unaware of the dangers that lie ahead.  Lines are drawn as love and loyalty are tested, even among the truest friends and family, in an increasingly divided wizarding world. 

The film features an ensemble cast led by Eddie Redmayne, Katherine Waterston, Dan Fogler, Alison Sudol, Ezra Miller, Zoë Kravitz, Callum Turner, Claudia Kim, William Nadylam, Kevin Guthrie, Carmen Ejogo, Poppy Corby-Tuech, with Jude Law and Johnny Depp. 

“Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald” is directed by David Yates, from a screenplay by J.K. Rowling.  The film is produced by David Heyman, J.K. Rowling, Steve Kloves and Lionel Wigram.  Tim Lewis, Neil Blair, Rick Senat and Danny Cohen serve as executive producers.

The film reunites the behind-the-scenes creative team from the first “Fantastic Beasts” film, including Oscar-winning director of photography Philippe Rousselot (“A River Runs Through It”), three-time Oscar-winning production designer Stuart Craig (“The English Patient,” “Dangerous Liaisons,” “Gandhi,” the “Harry Potter” films), four-time Oscar-winning costume designer Colleen Atwood (“Chicago,” “Memoirs of a Geisha,” “Alice in Wonderland,” “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”), and Yates’ longtime editor Mark Day (the last four “Harry Potter” films).  The music is by eight-time Oscar nominee James Newton Howard (“Defiance,” “Michael Clayton,” “The Hunger Games” films).

Slated for release on November 16, 2018, the film will be distributed worldwide in 2D and 3D in select theatres and IMAX by Warner Bros. Pictures.

This film is rated PG-13 for some sequences of fantasy action.

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Announcing the publication of Jennifer Skiff’s Rescuing Ladybugs:

Inspirational Encounters with Animals That Changed The World

There are countless times throughout our lives when we’re presented with a choice to help another soul. What happens then? Jennifer Skiff's new book, Rescuing Ladybugs, highlights the true stories of remarkable people who didn’t look away from seemingly impossible-to-change situations and instead worked to save animals. Leaders in what the author calls the compassion movement, their stories illustrate how we can break the barriers that have collectively caged and separated us to improve all life on earth. This empowering book inspires us to nurture our love for other animals while igniting our purpose and creating personal happiness.

This extraordinary book takes you on an around-the-world adventure with superstar animal advocate Jennifer Skiff. Starting with the moment she connected with a tortured bear in Laos, the story continues with her successful quest to free him by building the first bear sanctuary in that country. The stories in this book are about the people Jennifer has met along the way who — like her — are changing the world for the better one species at a time and the amazing creatures they encounter.

What people are saying:

Rescuing Ladybugs is an exceptional book — a clarion call to awaken our empathy, ignite compassionate action, and help recover our humanity in these dystopian times. It should be required reading.”

— Dr. Michael W. Fox, author of The Boundless Circle

“My heart responds to Jennifer Skiff’s book because animals and humans are connected — we help, teach, heal, and rescue one another. Please read Rescuing Ladybugs, learn, and follow your heart to connect with and help our family of animals. Everyone will benefit.”

— Dr. Bernie S. Siegel, author of Love, Animals & Miracles

“Everyone will love Rescuing Ladybugs. With a perfect balance of memoir, stories, and testimonials, this remarkable book and the heroes in it will make you laugh, will make you cry — and, more than anything else, will invite you to become a member of the kindest, most joyous, and most rewarding movement on the planet: the compassion movement.”

— Natasha Milne, coeditor of One Hundred & One Reasons to Get Out of Bed and host of My Home Planet podcast

Jennifer Skiff is an award-winning journalist who traveled the globe as a correspondent for CNN for more than a decade. Passionate about animals and their welfare, she serves as a trustee, adviser, and spokesperson for charities around the world while working with lawmakers to create positive change. www.JenniferSkiff.com

Rescuing Ladybugs: Inspirational Encounters with Animals That Changed the World

By Jennifer Skiff

Category: Animals ** Pub. Date: September 10, 2018

Price: $15.95 ** Trade Paper ** Also available as an ebook

Pages: 296 **ISBN: 978-1-60868-502-8

Paul Watson – Sea Shepherd

Captain-Paul-WatsonCaptain Paul Watson is the founder of Sea Shepherd Conservation Society – an organization dedicated to research, investigation and enforcement of laws, treaties, resolutions and regulations established to protect marine wildlife worldwide.

Watson was one of the founding members and directors of Greenpeace. In 1977, he left Greenpeace and founded Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. A renowned speaker, accomplished author, master mariner, and lifelong environmentalist, Captain Watson has been awarded many honors for his dedication to the oceans and to the planet. Among many commendations for his work, he received the Genesis Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1998, was named as one of the Top 20 Environmental Heroes of the 20th Century by Time Magazine in 2000, and was inducted into the U.S. Animal Rights Hall of Fame in Washington D.C. in 2002. He was also awarded the Amazon Peace Prize by the president of Ecuador in 2007.

In 2012, Captain Watson became only the second person after Captain Jacques Cousteau to be awarded the Jules Verne Award, dedicated to environmentalists and adventurers.” For more info: ww.seashepherd.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

(WASHINGTON) June 27, 2018 -- A new statewide poll by Remington Research Group commissioned by the Humane Society of the United States shows that a supermajority of Alaskans strongly oppose the Department of the Interior’s plan to permit the use of cruel and unsporting practices to kill bears, wolves and caribou on the National Park Service’s National Preserve lands in Alaska. Alaskans in both major political parties, as well as hunters and non-hunters, stand together in opposing these cruel methods.

On May 22, 2018, the National Park Service proposed a rule that would roll back an Obama-era regulation prohibiting extreme and controversial killing methods on National Preserves in Alaska. The survey showed that a supermajority of Alaskan voters, by a three-to-one margin, oppose allowing hunters to kill black bears and their cubs with artificial lights when they are hibernating in their dens, hunting black bears with packs of hounds, and hunting swimming caribou with the aid of motorboats.

By a two-to-one margin, a supermajority of Alaskan voters oppose the baiting of bears with pet food, grease, rotting game or fish or other high-calorie foods, and killing whole packs of wolves and coyotes when they are raising their pups at their dens.

In addition to opposing these cruel-killing methods, which would be permitted under the plan, a majority of Alaskan voters disfavor the killing of wolves, brown bears, black bears, wolverines, lynx and other wildlife on state lands along the northeast boundary of Denali National Park and Preserve.

Nicole Paquette, vice president of wildlife for the Humane Society of the United States, said, “Alaskans and the majority of Americans oppose the killing of brown bears, black bears, wolves and other species using unthinkably inhumane and unsporting practices on National Preserves in Alaska. Overturning the National Park Service’s 2015 rule is simply and purely motivated by trophy-hunting special-interest groups. This administration is catering to trophy hunters and trappers by proposing to subject our nation’s iconic wildlife to unnecessary cruelty on these federal lands that are owned by all Americans.” 

The poll asked the following questions:

Q: On the National Park Service’s National Preserves in Alaska such as Glacier Bay, a 2015 rule prohibited hunters from killing sleeping black bears (including mothers with dependent cubs) in the den with the aid of artificial lights such as flashlights. Do you support or oppose a proposal to again allow the killing of hibernating black bear mothers and their cubs with the aid of artificial lights on national preserves in Alaska?

Oppose 71 percent

Support: 22 percent

Not sure: 7 percent

Q: On the National Park Service’s National Preserves in Alaska, such as Gates of the Arctic, a 2015 rule prohibited guides from using packs of hounds to chase and corner black bears in trees so that hunters could more readily shoot them. Do you support or oppose a new proposal to again allow guides paid by hunters to hunt bears with hounds on national preserves in Alaska?

Oppose: 69 percent

Support: 26 percent

Not sure: 5 percent

Q: On National Park Service’s National Preserves in Alaska, a 2015 rule prohibited the killing of swimming caribou including with motor-powered boats. Do you support or oppose a new proposal to again allow the killing of swimming caribou, including with motor-powered boats, on national preserves in Alaska?

Oppose: 75 percent

Support: 22 percent

Not sure: 3 percent

Q: On the National Park Service’s National Preserves in Alaska such as Katmai, a 2015 rule prohibited hunters and trappers from baiting brown and black bears. Hunters and trappers bait bears with pet food, grease, rotting game or fish and other high calorie foods. Baiting bears accustoms them to a certain location making it easier for a hunter to shoot them. Do you support or oppose a new proposal to again allow hunters to bait brown and black bears on national preserves in Alaska?

Oppose: 60 percent

Support: 34 percent

Not sure: 6 percent

Q: On the National Park Service’s National Preserves in Alaska, such as Denali, a 2015 rule prohibited hunters and trappers from killing wolves and coyotes at den sites. Do you support or oppose a proposal to again allow hunters and trappers to kill whole wolf- and coyote-family members, including their pups, at their den sites on national preserves in Alaska?

Oppose: 57 percent

Support: 34 percent

Not sure: 9 percent

Each year, hunters and trappers target and kill wolves, brown bears, black bears, wolverines, lynx and other wildlife on state lands along the northeast boundary of Denali National Park & Preserve (also known as the Stampede Trail). This affects Denali’s ecosystem and reduces the Park's 650,000 annual visitors’ wildlife-viewing success. Do you support or oppose establishing a no-kill buffer zone on these state lands adjacent to the northeast boundary of Denali National Park and Preserve to protect wolves, bears, wolverines, lynx and other wildlife?

Support: 54 percent

Oppose: 37 percent

Not sure: 9 percent

The telephone poll of 1,004 statewide Alaskan voters was conducted by Remington Research Group on behalf of the Humane Society of the United States from June 18 through June 19, 2018. The margin of error is plus or minus three percent with a 95 percent level of confidence. 

 

The Humane Society of the United States is the most effective animal protection organization, as rated by our peers. For more than 60 years, we have celebrated the protection of all animals and confronted all forms of cruelty. We and our affiliates are the nation’s largest provider of hands-on services for animals, caring for more than 100,000 animals each year, and we prevent cruelty to millions more through our advocacy campaigns. Read about our more than 60 years of transformational change for animals and people. HumaneSociety.org.

 

RED CROSS RESPONSE TO KILAUEA LAVA UPDATE #2

HONOLULU, HI- May 4, 2018: Two Red Cross shelters remain open for residents evacuated from their homes due to the Kilauea lava threat at the following locations:

               Pahoa Community Center (15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa, HI 96778)

               Keaau Community Center (16-186 Pili Mua St, Keaau, HI 96749)

As of noon on Friday, there were approximately 200 residents at the Pahoa Community Center and 2 residents at the Keaau Community Center.

The Red Cross recommends that people prepare their emergency kits for 14 days and bring their emergency supplies with them to shelters. Full details about what the kit should contain are available at www.redcross.org/hawaii (see Programs and Services/Disaster Preparedness).

Water - 1 gallon per person per day

Food - non-perishable

Flashlight

Radio -NOAA Weather Radio

Extra batteries

First aid kit

Medications & Medical items

Manual Can opener

Multi-purpose tool

Personal hygiene items

Copies of Documents (prescriptions, proof of address, deed/lease to home, insurance policies and proof of identity

Cell phone with chargers

Family Contact Information

Cash

Bedding

Change of clothes

Towels

Dishes

You may also need:

Baby supplies - bottles, baby food & diapers

Games and activities

Comfort items

Pet supplies - collar, leash, ID, food, water, carrier, bowl & medications

 

The Red Cross is a non-profit humanitarian organization which provides assistance to meet the immediate emergency needs of those affected by disasters. All Red Cross assistance to disaster victims is free. The Red Cross is not a government agency; it depends on public contributions to help others. Your gift supports the lifesaving mission of the American Red Cross in your community, across the country and around the world.  To send a contribution, mail your check to American Red Cross, 4155 Diamond Head Road, Honolulu, Hawaii 96816 or make a secure online donation at redcross.org/hawaii or call (808) 739-8109.

 

For more updates, follow the Hawaii Chapter of the American Red Cross on Twitter at @HawaiiRedCross. You can also contact the Hawaii Chapter at 808-734-2101 or visit redcross.org/hawaii.

#

Future Challenges for Antarctic Penguins as They Adapt to Changing Temperatures Revealed in “State Of Antarctic Penguins 2018” Report on World Penguin Day, April 25, 2018

Oceanites, Inc., a Washington DC based non-profit organization which has championed science-based conservation and decision making for more than 20 years, announced the release of its annual State of Antarctic Penguins 2018 report (SOAP 2018) on World Penguin Day, April 25, 2018

News Image
This large increase in Antarctic temperatures could be a bellwether for the kind of change many fear will happen to those of us in more temperate regions in decades ahead.

Oceanites, Inc., a Washington DC based non-profit organization which has championed science-based conservation and decision making for more than 20 years, announced the release of its annual State of Antarctic Penguins 2018 report (SOAP 2018). The SOAP report (available at https://Oceanites.org/soap) comprehensively summarizes the population size and trends of Antarctica’s five penguin species — Adélie, chinstrap, emperor, gentoo, and macaroni. The report also spotlights future challenges for Antarctic penguins as they adapt to changing temperatures in the region.

The Antarctic penguins total at least 6.1 million breeding pairs nesting at 661 or more sites across the entire Antarctic continent. The report used the most current scientific data, including 3,617 records from 108 sources of on-the-ground colony counts and satellite photo analyses.

The SOAP reports assist a wide variety of Antarctic interests: governments, scientists, NGOs, and the private sector, including fishing and tourism operators, as well as concerned citizens throughout the world.

Oceanites continues to closely track the notable changes in the Antarctic Peninsula, which has undergone a well-documented period of warming over the last six decades of +2˚ C. / 5˚ F. and in winter of +5˚ C. / 9˚ F. This increase is huge, and could be a bellwether for the kind of change many fear will happen to those of us in more temperate regions in decades ahead. In the Antarctic Peninsula, Oceanites’ Antarctic Site Inventory has noted Adélie and chinstrap penguin declines and gentoo penguin increases. However, there are indications that the warming trend has leveled off in recent years with a concomitant stabilization of some Adélie populations.

Ron Naveen, founder and president of Oceanites, noted: “It is through these changes in the Peninsula that we hopefully will better understand how future generations of mankind may or may not adapt to a similar amount of warming in our own backyard. When we see declines in two species while a third thrives, we must ask why such disparate responses? What drives such changes? Is it food supply, nesting and breeding conditions, or diseases? These are the questions we’ll ask when the warming we see today in the Antarctic comes our way.”

About Oceanites
Oceanites is taking the lead in penguin-focused messaging about climate change, so that all of us, working together, may do a better job steering our planet’s future. For additional information about Oceanites please visit https://www.Oceanites.org.

Talkin' Pets News

April 21, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer / Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests - Natalia Morris, oldest sister and main songwriter for SOUTHERN HALO as well as a big pet lover, will join host Jon Patch 4/21/18, live on Talkin’ Pets at 630pm ET to discuss & give away their upcoming album, Just Like in the Movies

Born Free Calls on UK Government to Implement Ivory Trade Ban Without Delay

UK ivory ban must inspire further international measures, take the commerce out of the ivory trade and pay attention to the plight of other ivory-bearing endangered species

Horsham, England -- March 4, 2018 ­-- Born Free today welcomes the long-awaited announcement of a ban on the commercial trade in elephant ivory within, to and from the United Kingdom. However, Born Free is seeking greater clarity about the appointment of a special regulator who will manage the accreditation of exempt items.

Born Free's co-founder and President, Will Travers OBE, said: "We applaud the government for its recognition of the need for the U.K., which has been the largest exporter of ‘legal’ ivory items in recent years, to take action on commercial ivory trade. African elephant range states, the international conservation community, and the British public, have all been calling for a comprehensive ban as the only way to help end the poaching epidemic which threatens the very future of wild elephants. We implore Parliament to pass the proposed measures into law without delay.”

Born Free believes the proposed online ivory registration process establishes, importantly, that the burden of proof now resides with the applicant. Furthermore, the range of penalties and fines for those who offend should have a suitably deterrent effect.

According to the government, the provenance of items exempted due to their rarity or cultural/historical importance, will be determined by independent advisors who will be accountable for their decisions.

Travers said: “In practice, it will be essential that anyone who seeks to trade ivory or facilitate the trade in ivory – including those who are responsible for its certification – must be held to account. Only a robust and highly precautionary approach will prevent these exemptions becoming loopholes that traffickers can exploit.”

Exempt items will include:

  • Items made before 1947 containing less than 10 percent of ivory by volume
  • Musical instruments containing less than 20 percent of ivory made before 1975
  • The “rarest and most important items” that are more than 100 years old, including portrait miniatures
  • Items traded between accredited museums.

Africa's elephant numbers have plummeted from perhaps 5 million a century ago, to less than half a million today, and upwards of 20,000 continue to be killed across the continent by poachers each year to supply criminal networks with ivory. Asian elephants, where only the males carry ivory and which number below 30,000, are also targeted for their tusks.

The U.K. has, in recent years, been the world's biggest exporter of legal ivory, largely in the form of antique worked items which have been in big demand among Asian buyers. This trade stimulates demand for ivory products and provides traffickers with a means by which they can launder new ivory from recently slaughtered elephants into trade.

Travers concluded: “Ending legal commercial trade in all ivory products is vital if we are to provide hope for beleaguered elephant populations. We need all countries that continue to operate legal markets and act as sources of ivory in international trade to step up and introduce similar measures to those announced here in the U.K. and, in particular, we urge the European Commission to announce far tougher restrictions on trade within, between and from EU countries without delay.

“We must also take into account the impact that closing elephant ivory trade and markets could have on other ivory-bearing species. For example, indications are that trade in poached hippo ivory is on the rise and official data confirms that since 2006 more than 50,000 kilograms of hippo ivory was released into trade – this from a species that may number as few as 130,000 individuals. Tackling the trade in ivory from other threatened species, such as hippos, narwhals and walruses, needs to be part of our immediate plan.”

Born Free has been campaigning for a global ban on commercial trade in all ivory products since 1989. The charity's advocacy, awareness-raising and public mobilization efforts have played a major part in informing recent decisions and persuading the UK government to take action. Born Free will continue with these efforts until the poaching of elephants and other ivory-bearing species has been brought to an end, and their future secured.

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