Displaying items by tag: animal shelters

Talkin' Pets News

January 13, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Suzanne Topor - Livingston Animal & Avian Hospital

Producer - Zach Budin

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Dear Friend, Tippi Hedren, Actress, Author, Animal Advocate, Business Woman and Model will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 01/13/18 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away her book "Tippi" and update us on her preserve Shambala 

Gail Miller Bisher, Director of Communications for the Westminster Kennel Club will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 1/13/18 at 630pm EST to discuss TELEVISION COVERAGE EXPANDS AS ENTRIES SOAR AT THE 142nd ANNUAL WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW  

Prashant Khetan, Chief Executive Officer and General Counsel at Born Free USA, will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 01/13/18 at 720pm EST to discuss the upcoming show and topic on CNN this weekend, "Trophy"

Linda
 Many of you may not realize that animal rescuers are inundated with emails and people begging us to help animals in shelters or people that have fallen on hard times, losing their homes, pets found out in the desert, abandoned. It's a very difficult world to live in.  We have a different skin because we live trying every minute of every day to save the innocent animals that were neglected, abandoned, or thrown away and it happens each and every day all over our country and the world. 
 We try so hard to keep going, to be able to put a smile on our face for the public and people that ask how we are doing. But does anyone really care how we are doing? Our world is a very difficult one to live in.
 After perusing hundreds of animals on the euthanasia list in the shelters, sending emails, trying to save lives I started to turn my computer off to go get a few hours of rest.  Something caught my eye. An email from a very brave lady that rescues dogs that are abandoned way back deep in the California desert.
 Once again it was another cruelty case, a starving beautiful, gentle, sweet pitbull abandoned to die, near starvation and fed something that poisoned its mouth so it could no longer eat or drink. My eyes, my heart, it's hard not to cry. I just had to reach out to you all, the loving animal community and beg you to donate to those of us that save these poor animals from their abandonment, neglect, starvation and witness so many horrible crimes that man does to these innocent animals.  I beg you to make a donation because that's the only thing that helps us to keep going is the financial aid. I don't take a salary; I give all your donations to the animals we are able to rescue through LBWF. 
 Make my day, no matter how small your donation or large, it helps us with the food, treats, water to fill their pools so they can play in the high of the summer.  We have to spay & neuter so many animals that sometimes come out of the shelters too sick to be medically treated at that time and we have to provide for them. Please won't you make a donation right now? Their lives depend on you and you depend on us to save them. Your donations count more than you can imagine! Please help me to keep fighting this war against the pet overpopulation and the abandoned animals. United we can make a difference I just keep believing that in my heart and my life! I
 XOXO
 Linda Blair
Donate
Rescue is a Lifestyle
What is an Animal Rescuer?
By: Linda Blair
     I think it's important to understand that when you hear the word "rescuer", it means "volunteer". It's you, me and anyone with an open heart or home to help one in need. Human or animal. In the case of an animal rescuer, we open our homes or find appropriate foster homes that can offer shelter to an animal in need.  This is similar to the process of finding foster homes for children in need.
What does an Animal Rescuer do?
 
     Well, in the "underground world" of animal rights advocates, we read thousands of emails about animals facing death sentences every day. At first you cry a lot, then you go into action and get involved.
     A rescuer will take in a stray animal on its way to the pound. A rescuer will walk the cold or hot cement shelter floors, listening to the cries of sadness and barking from scared animals, begging to be noticed and rescued. We see animals curled up in the corners, afraid or depressed.  Mother's begging to find shelter from the noise for their newborn pups or kittens.  Others, so hungry they'll eat anything deposited on the barren floors. Then there are the secret isolation rooms, closed to the public. Here you will find, the accident victims, those suffering from horrible mange and sometimes those that suffer from a cold, known as kennel cough, which can be fixed, but they'll never be seen by the public. Here, also, you will find where the horror cases are kept, victims
from unthinkable abuse. They suffer alone, behind closed doors. For unless a rescuer or good volunteer tells you, no one will ever see them. They are simply doomed to die. We ache, but we keep walking. We ask questions, and we think of anyone who might be looking for a dog or cat.  We get teary-eyed for those animals we know we just can't help.
     We carefully pick the animals we think we can help, both financially & emotionally, until we can find them a new loving, permanent home.  If an animal has been "fixed", you fill out the paperwork, which takes
awhile, and drive off with a scared new friend you've never met before. Neither of you knows the other. If an animal is unaltered (not spayed or neutered) they are sent to a clinic the next day and you pick them up, usually half asleep, and take them to another vet for a check up. If they have contracted a cold, known as "Kennel Cough", they must be quarantined at a veterinarian with a quarantine area, or a boarding facility with a quarantine. A foster home, who has no animals to protect from the upper respiratory cold is always best, but nearly impossible to find.  If the animal has mange, which is very contagious, it needs to be treated as well while in quarantine. Then we have boarding costs, feeding costs and sometimes large medical expenses. If they have broken limbs they must be operated on and kept in a quiet place to recover.
     We then have to get to know the animal. Are they friendly? Do they like people, other animals? Cats, dogs? What can we tell someone about them? Do they need minimal training, or extensive training?  Are they
housetrained? How old are they really? What breed or mix are they? We visit them during quarantine as much as possible. We take them for walks, play or just sit with them to get to know them.  And they need the opportunity to know us, too.
     We make flyers with a photograph, and the animal's story.  Then we drive around and distribute the flyers, and make phone calls and send emails.
     We schedule adoption days. We find a suitable place like a storefront, a small shopping mall, or pet store that allows us to set up a small adoption area with a playpen and food and water station, to show our "Adoptee".  In the summer months we hope to have "misters" to relieve them from the summer days heat. When someone is interested in one of our friends, we ask questions about their home and fenced yards, their work hours, and what kind of a companion they're looking for, and how much time they have to spend with them. We ask them to fill out questionnaires about themselves, so we can best decide who's correct for the animal and who the animal will best get along with.
For example, older dogs are happy to have a warm place, and love. Younger dogs need to be exercised more, and sometimes need more training. Puppies need it all; housetraining, obedience training, and a lifetime commitment.
     Our job, is healing & match making. When we finally make a choice, we've made the drive to someone's home, done our house check, paperwork, and taken a departing picture of our rescued animal, we say our goodbye's and drive away. Most of us cry a little, not always because we are sad, but because we saved a life.  Our job is complete. They will be missed, but we move on to the next one, for there are thousands just waiting for someone to rescue them. Waiting for someone to save them from the cold, frightening shelters, death row and the inevitable & foreboding death needle or far worse, in some states in America, the gas chamber.
 
Linda _ Butler
Our Recent Adoptions!
Recent Adoptions
Chewy.com supports LBWF!
Chewy.com
LBWF is now a proud affiliate of Chewy.com!.com
Place your first order with Chewy.com and they will donate $20.00 to LBWF! Just click on the picture to get started. Make sure to tell your family & friends to shop at Chewy.com for all your pets' needs & help support the rescued dogs!
Sally Snacks
Sally Snacks
 
 Sally Snacks is a great healthy treat for your dog. Sally Snacks are available to purchase on Amazon. Don't forget to use Amazon Smile
and select LBWF as your charity of choice!   
Nzymes
Nzyme products
Nzymes is a staple company in our cancer prevention work and highly recommended pet care for you and all your companion animals. I use it on all our rescue dogs and have seen the most miraculous results. I encourage you to use the 10% gift discount right now by ordering through their phone line (877-816-6500) and requesting a "Linda Blair Special" discount on their nzymes products. Please visit https://www.nzymes.com/ to read more about these amazing products.
STAY CONNECTED

 Like us on Facebook  Follow us on Twitter  
Instagram

BETTER PET, INC.’S DOG LAND APP CONNECTS DOG COMMUNITY WITH MORE >> THAN ONE MILLION USER SESSIONS WORLDWIDE >> >> LOS ANGELES, CA (August 14, 2014) – Dog Land [7], a mobile >> platform currently available on iOS, has cultivated a passionate >> community of dog lovers with over one million user sessions to date. >> The app is a social networking tool for dog parents to discover >> dog-friendly locations, ask and answer questions about pet care, and >> share dog-centric photos. >> The app is seeing heavy engagement from its users, who open the app >> an average of four times a week. Nearly 50 percent of all users who >> have accessed the app still remain active members after a month. >> >> Dog Land [7] brings together features from popular apps like Waze >> and Instagram to create an immersive experience for users and their >> dogs. By conveniently crowdsourcing dog-friendly locations around >> the world, Dog Land helps guide users in deciding where to bring >> their dogs. Algorithms determine the most relevant nearby locations >> such as hotels, restaurants, hiking trails, dog parks, pet stores, >> animal shelters, veterinarians, and more. Users can “mark their >> territory” at a location, rate its pet-friendliness, and add tips >> based on their experience. >> “With Dog Land [8], we set out to create an app that connects dog >> lovers with their community by showing dog friendly places and dog >> friendly people. We see ourselves as a fun navigation tool, with >> information driven by our community,” says President & Creative >> Director Gareth Wilson. >> Upon creating a Dog Land profile, users can share photos of their >> dog, as well as “dig,” or like, photos from other dog owners >> worldwide. Users can easily edit photos in-app by adding filters and >> text, and then post their photos on additional social media >> platforms, including Facebook and Twitter. >> <image004.jpg> >> CEO Jonathan Kolker adds, “We’re creating an ecosystem to foster >> healthier and happier lives for dogs and people, and we’re >> constantly researching new features to help us achieve this goal.” >> >> >> Dog Land [7] users, or “Doglandians,” connect on a local and >> global level. The app’s messaging features allows for one-on-one >> communication between dog lovers. Users can expand their pet network >> by chatting with their favorite dog owners to exchange advice, setup >> puppy play dates and find trusted friends to help with dog care. >> Dog Land is free and available worldwide exclusively through the >> iTunes App Store [9] in the Social Networking category. Visit >> http://www.doglandapp.com/ [7] for more information, including >> details on features and screenshots of the app. >>

(Jan. 9, 2014)—The following is a statement from Kimberley Alboum, North Carolina state director for The Humane Society of the United States, calling on Randolph County officials to reconsider their decision to continue the use of gas chambers at the county animal shelter. The HSUS gave the county a $3,000 grant in 2011 to fulfill its commitment to eliminate their gas chambers, but it was recently discovered that the chamber is still in use. The county was asked to either honor their commitment to discontinue using the chamber or return the funds, and has chosen the latter.

“We are saddened and dismayed that officials of Randolph County, North Carolina have chosen to reverse their commitment to end their use of a gas chamber in the county shelter.

It is shocking that a North Carolina county would return desperately needed funding for their animal shelter because they would rather continue a practice that has been denounced by every national humane organization. This does nothing but hurt the animals of Randolph County, for absolutely no reason.

We of course would prefer that the shelter keep the money and honor their commitment to stop the use of the gas chamber. We urge Randolph County officials to reconsider, and do the right thing."

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization, rated the most effective by its peers. Since 1954, The HSUS has been fighting for the protection of all animals through advocacy, education and hands-on programs. We rescue and care for tens of thousands of animals each year, but our primary mission is to prevent cruelty before it occurs. We're there for all animals, across America and around the world. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty—on the Web at humanesociety.org.


250,000 Animal Lives Saved; No-Kill New York City Within Reach



NEW YORK, NY: December 16, 2013 – In just one decade, the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals has brought New York City within reach of becoming a no-kill community.



Since its founding in 2003, this public-private coalition of more than 150 animal shelters, rescue groups, veterinarians, and others has saved the lives of more than a quarter of a million homeless animals and found homes for the vast majority. Because of the Alliance, New York City now has the lowest euthanasia rate per capita of any major U.S. metropolis (1 out of 1,000).



Said Jane Hoffman, co-founder, president and board chair of the Mayor’s Alliance, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization not affiliated with the City of New York: “The Alliance has succeeded because of the combined efforts and tireless dedication of its community partners. As we begin our second decade, the goal of a no-kill New York City is within sight and the strength of this collaboration has never been greater.”



The Alliance’s outsized impact on the welfare of New York City’s animals can be seen in achievements like these:



1.     Euthanasia of cats and dogs at the City’s animal shelters has declined 80 percent, to just over 6,000 (projected) from just under 32,000 a decade ago ─ an all-time low for Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C). This means that the Alliance and its member groups are succeeding in finding homes for eight out of every 10 dogs and cats entering AC&C.



2.     The Alliance’s shelters and rescue groups have found adoptive homes for more than a quarter of a million dogs and cats. In 2012 alone, 28,000 pets were adopted – many through Alliance events like Adoptapalooza!, Whiskers in Wonderland, and Maddie's®Pet Adoption Days.



3.     The Alliance's Wheels of Hope fleet of animal-transport vans has ferried almost 70,000 dogs and cats from AC&C shelters to foster and adoptive families, to Alliance partner shelters dedicated to finding them homes, and to veterinary appointments – all at no cost to the groups and individuals served. With transportation a particular challenge for many Alliance groups, Wheels of Hope, launched in 2005, fills a critical gap seven days a week, 365 days a year.



4.     The Alliance’s NYC Feral Cat Initiative, also launched in 2005, has made huge strides in solving New York City’s feral cat overpopulation crisis. By offering free training workshops to groups and individuals who perform Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR); through giveaways of cat food, straw, and additional critical supplies; and by means of other supportive efforts, the Alliance is helping to humanely reduce the number of community (feral) cats.



5.     The Alliance’s medical fund, a key initiative from the start, has paid for urgent veterinary care for thousands of sick and injured cats and dogs awaiting adoption.



Said President Jane Hoffman: “Working together, the individuals and groups of the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals have made a dramatic impact on the welfare of the homeless dogs and cats that share our city and our lives. We are proud of what we have achieved since our founding 10 years ago and we look forward to another decade of equally stellar results.”



# # #



The Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charity that works with more than 150 partner rescue groups and no-kill shelters to offer important programs and services to save the lives of NYC's homeless animals. Receiving no government funding, we are supported by donations from foundations, corporations, and individuals. As we mark our tenth anniversary in 2013, we are committed to transforming New York City into a no-kill community by 2015: where no dogs or cats of reasonable health and temperament will be killed merely because they do not have homes. www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org



# # #

For homeless cats and dogs in animal shelters across the country, the first weekend in June is somewhat like the Super Bowl weekend of second chances. June is generally the month that pet shelters launch initiatives to empty shelters to make way for a summer of new-found kittens and puppies and adult strays.

 

One such initiative has a lofty goal of finding 5,000 cats and dogs homes in an orchestrated event covering eight communities in five states and involving more than 150 pet shelters and rescues over Saturday, June 1, and Sunday, June 2. As part of its strategy to promote free adoption nationwide, Maddie’s Fund ® plans to host America’s biggest free adoption event, dedicating $4 million to the effort. Shelter locations participating can be found at http://adopt.maddiesfund.org/.

 

It’s not just the waiving of adoption fees that will inspire families to take a trip to the shelter that weekend, although with normal adoption fees ranging from $80 to $250 per pet, it doesn’t hurt, says President of Maddie’s Fund Rich Avanzino. But it’s more about the air of excitement that surround these events in each community.

 

“Human nature is to procrastinate and the free adoption weekends, with all their high-energy and media attention, encourage people to do what they’ve been planning on doing for a long time—adopt a pet,” says Avanzino, “We’re finding free adoption events are becoming a trend with shelters because they are a proven way to empty facilities and lighten the financial burden of caring long-term for animals, while at the same time finding loving homes for animals and reducing the need for euthanasia.”

Adopters must still qualify for their pets, and just because the pets are free, shelters aren’t out the expense for caring and housing the pet. Maddie’s Fund gives organizations from $500 to $2,000 per adoption. The more senior the animal with medical conditions, the bigger the gift.

“Maddie’s Fund wants to give all healthy, senior, and treatable shelter dogs and cats loving homes and free pet adoption events have proven very successful toward that end,” Avanzino adds.

The trend of holding free adoption events at animal shelters can only grow, Avanzino believes. “We’ll see more pet-loving benefactors in communities nationwide get on board with assisting their local shelters to apply the fee-waived strategy to save pet lives and alleviate the over-crowding in shelters,” he says.

 

More information on participating shelters can be found at: http://adopt.maddiesfund.org/.

Maddie’s Fund (www.maddiesfund.org) is a family foundation endowed by the founder of Workday® and PeopleSoft, Dave Duffield and his wife, Cheryl. Maddie’s Fund is helping to achieve and sustain a no-kill nation by providing solutions to the most challenging issues facing the animal welfare community through Maddie’s Grant Giving and Maddie’s InstituteSM . Maddie’s Fund is named after the family’s beloved Miniature Schnauzer who passed away in 1997.

ASPCA commends Rep. Jim Moran for encouraging states to prohibit the use of inhumane gas chambers

 

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) commends Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA) for introducing a resolution condemning the use of gas chambers in animal shelters. The resolution urges states to require injection by licensed and certified individuals to be the standard method of euthanasia at animal shelters.

“This measure is a huge step forward in the trend to abandon inhumane gas chambers,” said Nancy Perry, senior vice president of ASPCA Government Relations. “Gassing can take up to 30 minutes to kill an animal and often causes panic and suffering. We appreciate Rep. Moran for introducing this resolution to urge states to abandon this outdated method."

“I am pleased to introduce this resolution with the support of several of my constituents to bring more attention to this unnecessarily gruesome practice of using gas chambers to kill shelter animals,” said Rep. Moran. “I am hopeful that with the continued advocacy of compassionate citizens, we can put an end to this outdated practice.”

H. Res. 736, if passed, would express the U.S. House of Representatives’ opposition to the use of gas chambers to euthanize shelter animals. It would also express support for state laws to require the use of more humane euthanasia methods. House simple resolutions convey the opinion of the House, and are not presented to the president to sign.

The ASPCA believes it is critically important that euthanasia is administered with compassion and care, which gas chambers do not provide. When performed properly, euthanasia by injection of sodium pentobarbital is the safest, most humane method, and the least stressful to the animal.

For more information on the ASPCA and to join the ASPCA Advocacy Brigade, please visit www.aspca.org.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

###

Animal shelters nationwide encouraged to apply for chance at more than $500,000
in prize grants for saving more homeless dogs and cats


NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced that applications are now open in the 2012 ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge, with more than $500,000 in prize grants to help shelters save more homeless cats and dogs.

Beginning at 12 noon ET today, March 13, interested shelters can apply to compete in the Qualifying Heat of the ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge. Applications will be accepted through 12 midnight ET on Thursday, March 15, or until 150 completed applications have been received – whichever comes first.

Shelters whose applications are accepted will go on to compete in the Qualifying Heat – 12 days of online voting to select this year’s 50 official Challenge contestants.  Qualifying Heat voting opens at 12 noon ET on Thursday, April 5 and closes at 12 midnight ET on Monday, April 16.

Once the 50 competing shelters are selected, they will set about to save at least 300 more cats and dogs during the months of August, September and October 2012 than they did during the same period last year.

The ASPCA and Rachael Ray will award a $100,000 grand prize to the shelter contestant that achieves the greatest increase in lives saved during this three-month period. A second place prize of $25,000 will be awarded to the shelter with the second greatest increase in lives saved, and the contestant that does the best job of engaging its community members in helping to save more animals will win $25,000. Those organizations that do the best in their divisions will be eligible for between $5,000 and $40,000 in additional grants.

The ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge is a groundbreaking contest that challenges animal shelters across the country to come up with innovative ways to engage their communities and get more homeless cats and dogs into loving homes. For more information about the 2012 ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge, please visit www.aspca.org/100kchallenge.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org. To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to www.twitter.com/aspca.

About Rachael Ray
Rachael Ray is best known as the host of the hit syndicated Emmy Award winning daytime television show “Rachael Ray” produced by CBS Television Distribution in association with Harpo Productions, Scripps Networks and Watch Entertainment.   Rachael's warmth, energy, and boundless curiosity also reach millions of fans through her popular Food Network shows, her lifestyle magazine Everyday with Rachael Ray, her bestselling cookbooks, her digital home base www.rachaelray.com, her signature line of cookware manufactured by Meyer, her meal transport products by RR Accessories and her pantry products by Colavita.  In 2007, Rachael launched the Yum-o! organization, a non-profit organization dedicated to empowering kids and their families to develop healthy relationships with food and cooking and in 2008 she partnered with Ainsworth Pet Nutrition to create a line of pet food with all of her proceeds being donated to organizations that help animals in need. For more information, visit www.rachaelray.com.

###

***SAVE THE DATE***

The Humane Society of the United States, the nation’s largest animal protection organization, wants to remind pet media that next week is National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week, and encourages you to help us get the word out to the pet-loving public to support their local shelters and rescues. Next week, you'll receive a the full press release for the event, but here's an abbreviated version that should provide enough information for early coverage. You can also find more information about the Week here: humanesociety.org/sheltersrock. 

Approximately 3,500 animal shelters across the United States serve the estimated 6-8 million homeless animals who need refuge each year, and many more animals find themselves in need of the services provided by local rescue groups.
 
National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week is a perfect opportunity for community members to become acquainted with their local shelters and rescues to help homeless pets, and this year, The HSUS teamed up with the PBS KIDS’ television series “Martha Speaks” to provide resources and information about supporting animal shelters, understanding and caring for pets, and responsible pet adoption.
 
Here are a few ways everyone can get involved to help save the homeless pets that shelters serve:
 
  1. Adopt a pet. Find your next pet online at theshelterpetproject.org,
  2. Promote pet adoption. Become a fan of the Shelter Pet Project on Facebook at facebook.com/shelterpetproject.
  3. Volunteer.  Helping animals at a shelter or rescue organization can be an incredibly rewarding experience. Look on local groups’ websites for opportunities or visit VolunteerMatch.org.
  4. Donate funds or supplies. Shelters and rescues are often in need of towels, toys, and other supplies for the animals – and collect needed items from family, friends, and colleagues.

 

A DOG NAMED CHRISTMAS
Hallmark Channel
US Cable Television Premiere
From the Hallmark Hall of Fame Collection
Sunday, November 20 (6 p.m. ET/PT, 5C) 

The ever-versatile Bruce Greenwood (“John From Cincinnati,” “Knots Landing”) stars in this heartwarming Hallmark Hall of Fame story about coming to terms with the past and the ways that Christmas can help to bring a family together.  Greenwood is George McCray, who lives on a Kansas farm with wife Mary Ann (Linda Emond, “Julie and Julia”) and their 20-year-old, developmentally-challenged son, Todd (Noel Fisher from “The Riches”).  It happens that a local animal shelter is looking for families to foster pets for the holidays, and Todd wants one desperately.  But George is dead-set against it, maintaining that his son won't be able to adequately care for a pet and that giving a dog back after Christmas will only traumatize him.  But we learn that the real reason why George opposes it has more to do with his own bad experiences with dogs in the past -- once while he was a kid, the other time when he was serving in Vietnam.  So it's really George with the issues surrounding canines.  And as his wife comes to realize, the one who really needs a dog this Christmas is her husband, not her son, in order for emotional wounds of the past to heal.  “A Dog Named Christmas” is the best kind of holiday tale, one that poignantly illustrates the unwavering resilience of the human spirit.