Displaying items by tag: Vets

 

New York, N.Y. –The American Kennel Club (AKC®), the world’s largest purebred dog registry and advocate for all dogs, continues its commitment to students pursuing their education in veterinary studies with the announcement of the 2019 AKC Veterinary Outreach Scholarship recipients.

This scholarship is designed to support individuals with a background of participation in AKC events and programs, who seek to promote animal health and medicine. A total of $35,000 in scholarship money was awarded.

Recipients of the AKC Veterinary Outreach Scholarship are: Julia O’Rourke (Purdue University), Courtney Wicker (North Carolina State University), Holly Arnold (Oregon State University), Hannah Loonsk (University of Pennsylvania), Tyler Myers (North Carolina State University), Julia Zuercher (Virginia-Maryland Regional College), Corene Bruhns (Cornell University), Emily Eppler (Kansas State), Kaitlin Gonzales (Oregon State University), Therese Millet (University of Illinois), Dylan DeProspero (North Carolina State University), Kaitlyn Dreese (University of Pennsylvania), Alison Folsom (Tufts University), Gabrielle Rands (Mississippi State University), Charlotte Wissel (University of Florida).

“The recipients of this scholarship are truly dedicated to the world of purebred dogs and the health and well-being of animals. They have worked hard to balance their demanding school schedules with participation in AKC events,” said Mari-Beth O’Neill, VP of Sport Services. “We are very proud of them and look forward to seeing their impact on the future of veterinary medicine.”

 

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About the American Kennel Club

Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization, which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.


Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers

NAT GEO WILD’S ANIMAL ER

IS “THE MAYO CLINIC” FOR ANIMALS

FOLLOW EXTREME VETERINARY CASES

 ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF ANIMAL CARE

Animal ER Premieres Saturday, August 19, at 10/9c on Nat Geo WILD

(WASHINGTON, D.C.— August 2, 2017) Gulf Coast Veterinary Specialists (GCVS) in Houston, Texas, is one of the most respected — and busiest — animal hospitals in the world, with more than 200 staff treating over 50,000 patients a year. Nat Geo WILD’s series Animal ER goes behind the scenes at the hospital to follow cases on the cutting edge of veterinary care. Animal ER returns for its second season onSaturday, Aug. 19, at 10/9c. For more information, visit our press website at www.foxflash.com or follow us on Twitter using @NGC_PR.

“GCVS has the most fascinating and dramatic range of cases in the country, with everything from exotics and zoo animals to family pets crashing through their doors 24/7,” said Geoff Daniels, executive vice president and general manager, Nat Geo WILD. “Combine this with an incredible cast of passionate vets, and you get some of the most innovative, expert and extraordinary animal care in the world. It will be like nothing else on TV.”

Follow patients as they are rushed into the hospital and through diagnosis and treatment. From dogs and cats to chimps and giant pythons, to rams and exotic birds, a broad range of pets are welcome. GCVS is the last stop for animals whose care is beyond the capabilities of their regular veterinarians, and GCVS doctors deal with the most complex and challenging animal cases. The hospital’s medical technology is state of the art and the care is cutting edge, as the staff constantly develops new approaches and techniques to treat their patients.

In Season Two of Animal ER, one of the largest veterinary hospitals in the country opens up new departments for our cameras, including their Critical Care, Cardiology, Dermatology and Ophthalmology wings.   Gulf Coast Veterinary Hospital in Houston, Texas, continues to provide cutting edge medicine for animals ranging from tigers and primates, to household pets and birds.  This season, procedures include the miraculous recovery of sight, the ability to walk again, and saving animals in critical condition. But no matter what the technology, Gulf Coast’s biggest asset is their staff, and their personal ties to their animal patients.   Lead by doctors Brian Beale, Heidi Hottinger, Carley Giovanella, Sue Chen, as well as dentist Chanda Miles, and technician Danielle Inman, these 200 plus staffers run what is considered to be the "Mayo Clinic" for animals in the state of Texas.

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About National Geographic Channels

The National Geographic Channels form the television and production arm of National Geographic Partners, a joint venture between 21st Century Fox and the National Geographic Society. As a global leader in premium science, adventure and exploration programming, the Channels include: National Geographic Channel (NGC), Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo People and Nat Geo MUNDO. Additionally, the Channels also run the in-house television production unit, National Geographic Studios. The Channels contribute to the National Geographic Society’s commitment to exploration, conservation and education with entertaining, innovative programming from A-level

talent around the world, and with profits that help support the society’s mission. Globally, NGC is available in more than 440 million homes in 171 countries and 45 languages, and Nat Geo WILD is available in 131 countries and 38 languages.

National Geographic Partners is also a leader in social media, with a fan base of 250 million people across all of its social pages. NGC contributes over 55 million social media fans globally on Facebook alone. For more information, visit www.natgeotv.com and www.natgeowild.com.

 
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FEBRUARY 2017

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 

March is Poison Prevention Awareness Month: Promote Safety!

Are these common household items within reach of your patients? Take time this month to remind patient families to sweep their home for any hazards that can be moved or put away to prevent future risks.

Household Cleaners
Certain Plants (Complete List)
Potpourri and Candles
Medications
Certain Foods (Chocolate, macadamia nuts, onions to name a few)
Citronella Candles
Ice Melters
Cocoa Mulch
Fabric Softener Sheets
Rodent and Pest Traps

Get More Details About This Checklist

Celebrate Pet Dental Health Month with your Senior Pet

Do you have your recommended dental appointments scheduled for this year? How about for your dog or cat? February is Pet Dental Health Month, and it’s an important reminder that just like you, your pets can experience plaque and tartar build up that can eventually lead to periodontal disease.  

Read the Full Article

10 Facts You Should Know About the Westminster Dog Show

The events of the 141st Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show begin on February 11, 2017. This venerable event allows all of us to see some amazing dogs doing some truly amazing things, whether you are cheering for the giant Irish Wolfhound or the tiny Yorkie.

See all 10 Facts about the WKC Dog Show

Cognitive Health Resources for Veterinarians

The Neutricks Vet Portal is an area on the Neutricks website that provides research, marketing materials, a vet directory and other resources for veterinarians to ensure you are have what you need to promote, educate and consult on Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome with your patients.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

Share Neutricks with fellow vet colleagues
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Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA You received this email because you are subscribed to The Vet Portal from Neutricks, LLC.

 
 
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NOVEMBER 2016

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 

November Sales of Neutricks Benefit The Grey Muzzle Organization

In September, we launched a new program that is designed to help benefit select senior dog organizations in their efforts to care for and find foster homes for senior pets.  During November and December, sales of Neutricks will go to help The Grey Muzzle Organization.

Read More About Grey Muzzle

It's Adopt A Senior Pet Month

All November long, Neutricks is helping promote Adopt A Senior Pet Month. It's the perfect time to consider bringing and older pet into your life!

Continue Reading about Adopt a Senior Pet Month

Pet Medical Insurance Beginner's Guide

As dogs and cats gets older, is pet medical insurance something that owners should consider? Like the many other insurance policies, there are numerous options available to choose from. Neutricks is helping owners get educated on this topic.

Continue Reading our Pet Medical Insurance Guide

Our Research is now Easier to Find

Our research has always been available in the vet portal on our website.  However we've gotten feedback lately that it was still hard to find.  So last month, we added a link to "Research" right at the top of our site in the main navigation.  This is a shortcut to the vet portal and gives you a quicker way to access the research section.  We hope this change will make our research more convenient to vets and other animal professionals.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

Share Neutricks with fellow vet colleagues
Thanks for reading!

Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711  

 

OCTOBER 2016

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rosco at Old Friends

October Neutricks Sales Benefit Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary

Starting in September, we launched a new program that is designed to help benefit select senior dog organizations in their efforts to care for and find foster homes for senior pets.  September and October's chosen organization is Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary in Tennessee.

Read More or Support Old Friends

CT Pet Show

Neutricks will be at the CT Pet Show This Weekend

This weekend, October 29-30, we will be attending the CT Pet Show in Hartford, CT!  You can stop by and say hi to us at Booth 2225.  Learn more about this weekend's event by watching our Neutricks Twitter account or clicking the link below to view the event's official site.

Read more about the CT Pet Show

 

Neutricks Vet Portal

Our Research is now Easier to Find

Our research has always been available in the vet portal on our website.  However we've gotten feedback lately that it was still hard to find.  So this month, we added a link to "Research" right at the top of our site in the main navigation.  This is a shortcut to the vet portal and gives you a quicker way to access the research section.  We hope this change will make our research more convenient to vets and other animal professionals.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

 

 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

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Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA

 

(SCHAUMBURG, Illinois) August 11, 2016--Dr. Janet Donlin has been named executive vice president/chief executive officer of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). Donlin will succeed Dr. Ron DeHaven, who is retiring after nine years of service to the AVMA.

Donlin has served as chief executive officer of the AVMA Professional Liability Insurance Trust (AVMA PLIT) since April 2013. The AVMA PLIT is now in its 54th year of dedicated service to AVMA members, providing a wide variety of insurance-related products to veterinarians, veterinary practices and veterinary students.

AVMA President Dr. Tom Meyer cited Donlin’s decades-long service to the veterinary profession and her extensive professional achievements as key factors to her being named the lead executive of a national veterinary association that is approaching a total membership of 90,000 veterinarians from all walks of professional life.

“Dr. Donlin is one of the true champions of veterinary medicine and all it stands for,” Meyer said. “She has an outstanding record of success in both the veterinary association arena and in the animal health industry. She is a skilled strategist with a proven background of diverse AVMA experience and a known reputation for working with leaders from all segments of the veterinary profession, key stakeholders and staff members to drive innovation, growth and success.

“Janet is highly skilled at building teams that can identify member needs and drive programs that deliver the products and services our members want, need and expect,” Meyer continued. “The AVMA is fortunate to welcome Janet to the helm of our national association. She understands the importance of working collaboratively to achieve our shared objectives. She is uniquely qualified to take the role of AVMA executive vice president and chief executive officer.”

Donlin’s hiring marks her return to an association for which she first started working in 1991 as an assistant director in what was then the AVMA Scientific Activities Division. Over the course of the next 17 years, she served as an interim division director, associate executive vice president and assistant executive vice president. Her role as assistant executive vice president required her to work hand-in-hand with the executive vice president to drive execution of the objectives established by the AVMA Board. From 2000-2001, Donlin’s role at the AVMA also included serving as interim CEO of the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues, where she oversaw the establishment of the commission as a nonprofit organization.

“My time at the AVMA and my experiences across the profession have reinforced for me time and again that our membership is very diverse, our needs are constantly evolving and our profession continues to face new challenges and opportunities,” Donlin said. “That’s why I’m committed to making certain we continue to build on the AVMA’s core strengths so that we are even more responsive to the needs of our members, and that we advocate with a strong, clear voice on behalf of our entire profession.

“I’m excited to work closely with AVMA leadership and staff, and our colleagues and strategic partners, to advance the AVMA’s mission ‘to lead the profession by advocating for our members and advancing the science and practice of veterinary medicine to improve animal and human health.’ ”

Retiring CEO DeHaven said Donlin’s hiring will bring skilled leadership, as well as sound foundational knowledge, to an association that continues to evolve in order to best meet its members’ needs.

“Dr. Donlin is an experienced association professional with an exceptional amount of knowledge of, and experience with, the AVMA and our membership,” DeHaven said. “She is exactly the right person to continue what we are doing to meet member needs and to take us to the next level.”

Donlin served as chief veterinary officer in the Global Veterinary Business Channel of Hill’s Pet Nutrition from August 2007 to March 2013, where she provided veterinary insights to drive development of innovative products and services to meet the evolving needs of the veterinary profession and pet owners.

She received both her DVM and her Bachelor of Science degree in medical technology from the University of Minnesota. She is also a graduate of the veterinary technician program at the Medical Institute of Minnesota. She is a licensed veterinarian in Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin, and has professional membership in several associations, including the AVMA, the American Animal Hospital Association, the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, the American Association of Equine Practitioners, the American Association of Swine Veterinarians, the Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association, the American Society of Association Executives, and the American Association of Corporate and Public Practice Veterinarians.

Donlin is the first veterinarian to earn the Certified Association Executive credential from the American Society of Association Executives. She is a former trustee of the AVMA’s Group Health Life Insurance Trust (now known as AVMA Life), and she is a former board member of the American Association of Corporate and Public Service Veterinarians.

Donlin will begin her employment at the AVMA September 12.

“I’m passionate about member service, and I am honored and humbled to be entrusted with what I consider to be one of the most important positions in veterinary medicine,” Donlin said.

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ITHACA, N.Y. – Dr. Lorin D. Warnick, interim dean of the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, has been named the Austin O. Hooey Dean of Veterinary Medicine, effective May 6. His appointment was approved this week by the Executive Committee of the Cornell University Board of Trustees and ratified by the Board of Trustees for the State University of New York.

“Lorin is the ideal choice to lead the College of Veterinary Medicine as dean,” said Cornell Provost Michael Kotlikoff, in announcing the appointment. “He is a proven leader who has managed the college effectively and with great thoughtfulness since taking over as interim dean last year. He will keep the college on the cutting edge of best practices in veterinary medicine and scientific research.”

SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher said, “Dr. Warnick’s experience will continue to be a great asset for the college’s faculty, staff and students as well as the medical community.”

“Dr. Warnick has already built upon the college’s foundation of academic excellence and community service,” agreed SUNY Board Chairman H. Carl McCall.

Warnick assumed the post of interim dean Aug. 1, 2015, after Kotlikoff, the college’s previous dean, became provost. Prior to that, Warnick served as associate dean for veterinary education since 2007 and director of the Cornell University Hospital for Animals since 2012. As interim dean, Warnick has supported the college’s ongoing projects, including the preclinical class expansion construction project, which has involved renovating and replacing the center of the college to allow for a larger fall class in 2017. He has also continued a long-standing collaboration with the City University of Hong Kong to develop the first school of veterinary medicine there.

Though Warnick has been a faculty member in the college since 1996, he said, “Being interim dean has given me new insights into how the college operates and an in-depth understanding of the main issues we are facing.”

In his role as dean, Warnick said his overall vision is “to excel in our core missions of research, veterinary education, graduate education and service to the public.”

Specifically, on the research side, Warnick aims to make high-level faculty recruitments, especially in areas of biomedical research, where the college plans to promote collaborations across campus and with Weill Cornell Medicine.

In the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program, Warnick said he will continue to work on educational initiatives to improve preparation for the primary care small-animal practice. This will include completion of a new facility to house the college’s Community Practice Service.

In addition to clinical experience, “We want to better prepare our students to be engaged in business entrepreneurship and new technology, and really play a leadership role in the business side of veterinary medicine,” he said.

With the number of U.S. veterinary schools expanding, Warnick sees “recruiting the best DVM students,” with a focus on diversifying each class, as an immediate challenge. He said his administration will continue looking for ways to reduce student debt levels and provide a greater variety of career opportunities. Veterinary medicine affects human and animal health, covering food production and safety, public health, racing and performance horses, biomedical research, wildlife conservation and international development as well as companion animal care. “We would like to have our students prepared and to have options to participate in all of those different areas,” he said.

A professor of ambulatory and production medicine, Warnick’s research focuses on enteric bacteria that can cross species and lead to illness in humans. His work emphasizes Salmonella in dairy cattle. “We look at the Salmonella bacteria that are transferred from cattle to people, and try to determine to what extent the pathogens found in people came from livestock sources,” he said.

Another of his main research areas includes the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria and how much these microbes are shared between different host populations. Warnick said with the help of his lab team he plans to continue with research while serving as dean.

Warnick received a bachelor’s degree from Brigham Young University (1984), a DVM degree from Colorado State University (1988) and a Ph.D. with an emphasis on epidemiology and statistics from Cornell (1994). He is a diplomate in the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.

TPR News
Saturday, May 2, the 122nd day of 2015.
There are 243 days left in the year.May is National Pet Month, Responsible Animal Guardian Month and Pet Cancer Awareness Month!!!Coming up this week May 3-9, 2015 it is National Pet Week. Held the first full week of May by the American Veterinary Medical Association.Crew:
Jon Patch - Host
Vince & Lisa Centonze - DVMs/Co Host
Zach Budin - Network Producer
Bob Page - Executive Producer
Special Guests:
Dr. Brian Hare host of "Is Your Dog a Genius?" on NAT GEO WILD will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 5/2/15 at 5 PM EST to discuss his television show
Joann Lindenmayer, Humane Society International's Senior Manager for Disaster Operations will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 5/2/15 at 530 PM EST to discuss the disaster in Nepal.
Keith Winslow, Host of Voice for Veterans, to discuss the Kentucky Derby winner and his fundraiser for Veterans, with Paddock's coffee give away

BETTER PET, INC.’S DOG LAND APP CONNECTS DOG COMMUNITY WITH MORE >> THAN ONE MILLION USER SESSIONS WORLDWIDE >> >> LOS ANGELES, CA (August 14, 2014) – Dog Land [7], a mobile >> platform currently available on iOS, has cultivated a passionate >> community of dog lovers with over one million user sessions to date. >> The app is a social networking tool for dog parents to discover >> dog-friendly locations, ask and answer questions about pet care, and >> share dog-centric photos. >> The app is seeing heavy engagement from its users, who open the app >> an average of four times a week. Nearly 50 percent of all users who >> have accessed the app still remain active members after a month. >> >> Dog Land [7] brings together features from popular apps like Waze >> and Instagram to create an immersive experience for users and their >> dogs. By conveniently crowdsourcing dog-friendly locations around >> the world, Dog Land helps guide users in deciding where to bring >> their dogs. Algorithms determine the most relevant nearby locations >> such as hotels, restaurants, hiking trails, dog parks, pet stores, >> animal shelters, veterinarians, and more. Users can “mark their >> territory” at a location, rate its pet-friendliness, and add tips >> based on their experience. >> “With Dog Land [8], we set out to create an app that connects dog >> lovers with their community by showing dog friendly places and dog >> friendly people. We see ourselves as a fun navigation tool, with >> information driven by our community,” says President & Creative >> Director Gareth Wilson. >> Upon creating a Dog Land profile, users can share photos of their >> dog, as well as “dig,” or like, photos from other dog owners >> worldwide. Users can easily edit photos in-app by adding filters and >> text, and then post their photos on additional social media >> platforms, including Facebook and Twitter. >> <image004.jpg> >> CEO Jonathan Kolker adds, “We’re creating an ecosystem to foster >> healthier and happier lives for dogs and people, and we’re >> constantly researching new features to help us achieve this goal.” >> >> >> Dog Land [7] users, or “Doglandians,” connect on a local and >> global level. The app’s messaging features allows for one-on-one >> communication between dog lovers. Users can expand their pet network >> by chatting with their favorite dog owners to exchange advice, setup >> puppy play dates and find trusted friends to help with dog care. >> Dog Land is free and available worldwide exclusively through the >> iTunes App Store [9] in the Social Networking category. Visit >> http://www.doglandapp.com/ [7] for more information, including >> details on features and screenshots of the app. >>

 

(THE COMFY SOFA, My House, Annapolis, Maryland) August 7, 2013—Around this time of the year many of you humans are getting ready for your annual vacation. I understand this is something you bipeds look forward to, but frequently, when you leave, you are unable—or choose not to—take your cat with you.

Why anyone would choose to leave their cats behind confounds me, because I can’t imagine anything wonderful happening when a cat is not around, nor can I imagine looking forward to something that does not involve cats. But I also don’t understand why you would eat anything other than tuna if you were able to do so—to each his own, I suppose.

In the hopes that I can help you find ways to include your cats in your travel plans, I have amassed the following list of tips to help you bring your cats with you when you travel this year.

1.  Get your cat to the veterinarian—Ensure your cats are up to date on all of their vaccinations and also that they are on the appropriate preventative medications and best diets for their age, lifestyle and health status.

2.  Get your cats used to their carriers—However you are traveling, you will want to be sure your cats like their carriers.  I know some people think that this is impossible, but I love mine. It’s easy to show your cats how wonderful their carriers can be--watch this video to see how. We cats can get spooked when traveling; there are lots of new noises, smells and sights for us to take in and it can be a bit much. Your cats will be much happier if they are somewhere they feel safe and are surrounded by soft blankets or pillows that smell like home.

3.  Proper identification is important—Prior to travel, you will want to double check to be sure that the information listed on your cat’s collar tags and registered with your microchip company is up to date. If you don’t have either of those identification forms for your cat, it’s in your and your cat’s best interest to have both. Microchips have helped reunite millions of lost pets with their people and a collar with tags visually tells others that your cat has a home and belongs somewhere if it gets out when you are traveling.

4.  Find pet-friendly accommodations—More and more hotels, rentals and resorts are becoming pet friendly. Call ahead to make sure your vacation destination is somewhere that allows your feline friends to come along.

5.  Pack for your cat, too—Make your home away from home as comfortable as possible. Bring your cats’ favorite blankets and toys to ensure they feel at ease at your vacation spot. Be sure to pack enough of your cat’s food to last through the time you will be away, as sometimes it can be hard to find the same food your cats are used to and vacation is no time for upset tummies.

6.  Find the nearest emergency veterinary hospital—Make sure you know where the closest clinic and emergency hospital are located prior to leaving so you’re prepared in the event of an emergency. It’s also a good idea to pack your cat’s veterinary records so that you can be sure to give the best information to the veterinarian seeing your cat.

7.  Give your cat some time to acclimate to its new surroundings—After traveling, your cat may be a little leery of its vacation house, so just give it some time and space to get used to things. While I hate to admit it, I have been known to hide out under a bed for a couple hours after being introduced to a new location. It’s normal, and if you take time to get your cat to love its carrier, it will have a ready-made, safe and familiar place to hide out while getting used to things.

Vacation should be for the whole family, so if possible, be sure to bring your cat along.  If not, there are many options for you to ensure your cat is having a great time while you’re away. Many veterinary offices also offer boarding, so check with your veterinarian to see if they offer this service. You can also look into dedicated boarding facilities.

If I can’t go along on vacation, my next favorite option is to have a pet sitter come and take care of me in my home. Your veterinarian may be able to recommend a service, or friends or family may be able to recommend someone local. Pet Sitters International, an organization that offers a list of certified pet sitters, is another resource.

Ideally your pet sitter will also spend some time in the house, playing with your cats and giving them a good scratch behind the ears. I particularly like talking with my sitter about what I saw out the window that day as she brushes my fur. Because your pet sitter will be in your house—and caring for your most loved companion--I would recommend asking for references prior to hiring someone for the first time. Your cats will let you know what they thought of the sitter when you come home.

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The CATalyst Council is a national organization which includes a wide variety of animal health and welfare organizations as well as corporate members of the animal health industry that are working together to improve the health and welfare of America’s  favorite pet.  It was founded in response to  troubling statistics released by the American Veterinary Medical Association that indicate an increase in our nation’s pet cat population coupled with a decline in veterinary care for those cats.  More information about the CATalyst Council is available at www.catalystcouncil.org.

 

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