Displaying items by tag: Vet school

HOW TO MAKE IT THROUGH VET SCHOOL

AND LIVE TO TELL THE TALE

NAT GEO WILD’S NEW SERIES VET SCHOOL GOES BEHIND THE SCENES AT ONE OF THE COUNTRY’S TOP VETERINARY SCHOOLS

Vet School Premieres Saturday, Sept. 19, 10/9c on Nat Geo WILD

(WASHINGTON, D.C. – July 15, 2015) Grab your stethoscope, leave your nerves at the door and step into the high-pressure, big-reward world at one of the top vet schools in the country, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. Nat Geo WILD has exclusive access to follow first-year students mastering the basics, and fourth-year students handling difficult cases from hamsters to horses. Will this cream-of-the-crop crew crack under the pressure of first injections, squirmy patients and animals they’ve never seen before? Vet School premieres Saturday, Sept. 19, at 10/9c on Nat Geo WILD (for more information on Vet School, visit www.natgeowild.com and follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/NGC_PR).

Now, it’s no secret that Nat Geo WILD loves veterinarians. Our No. 1 show is The Incredible Dr. Pol; last year we introduced ratings winner, Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER; and Dr. Oakley, Yukon Vet has been a network mainstay. Vet School brings us all the way back to the first step of a vet’s career, when they are overwhelmed every day with a mountain of information that they must digest, commit to memory and recall at a moment’s notice. What unites them all is a love for animals and a passionate desire to make a difference. These qualities are what make all of our vet shows must-watch TV, and Vet School is a natural extension of our success in the genre.

In medical school, students learn to care for one species. In Vet School, students train to care for hundreds. See for yourself the blood, sweat and tears it takes to become a top vet. . Students must quickly master tasks including restraining animals, repairing a bone fracture in a horse’s leg, inserting a pacemaker into a dog, and removing an abscess from a pet turkey. All in a day’s work.

Hannah Brodlie, Cristina Bustamante and Dan Cimino are first-year students who love animals and learning, but they are negotiating a steep learning curve on the road to becoming licensed vets. Hannah has worked in vet offices for years and wants nothing more than to be around animals all the time. Cristina is an international student from Colombia who looks forward to working with dogs day in and day out. Dan hopes to specialize in surgery. Singen Elliott, Aria Hill, and Aziza Glass are fourth-year students who are about to begin their professional careers. Aziza still struggles with her emotional investment in patients, Aria continues to work harder than ever before, and Singen dreams of becoming a large-animal surgeon.

Welcome to the world of Vet School, where students celebrate finishing an exam by sleeping an hour before studying for the next one. Good luck, students!

Premiere Vet School Episodes Include:

Vet School: Crash Course

Premieres Saturday, Sept. 19, 10/9c

First-year student Dan Cimino gets an in-depth introduction to the chaos of an ER. The evening begins slowly, but before long there are two serious emergencies. Fourth-year student Aria Hill is rewarded with some hands-on work during surgery to remove 10 teeth from a cat.Fourth-year studentSingen Eliott is schooled by an orthopedic surgeon who reminds him to treat the patient as the tiny kitten he is, not like one of Singen’s beloved horse patients.

Vet School: Day One

Premieres Saturday, Sept. 26, 10/9c

The first-year students are excited starting their veterinary school career but, much to their chagrin, they start by … dancing? Fourth-year student Singen Elliott loves large animals, but every veterinary student must rotate through small animals on their quest for a degree. Will Sophia the cat be his undoing? Finally, Millie, a 3-year-old bulldog, is in critical condition. She has congestive heart failure and has come to Cornell’s Companion Animal Hospital in a last-ditch effort to save her life. Fourth-year student Aziza Glass, in her first cardiology rotation, is part of the team that hopes to save Millie. Will this little bulldog make it through surgery?

Vet School: In Need of a Miracle

Premieres Saturday, Oct. 3, 10/9c

A patient comes in with a possible diagnosis of an aggressive form of cancer, but the final x-ray reveals something unusual. Fourth-year student Singen Elliott is working on Lewis, a dog with a suspected breathing issue. The problem is, when the docs try to get the dog to cough, they can’t seem to re-create the problem. Enter Singen, who is told to run Lewis around the hospital hallways to see if that works. Fourth-year student Aziza Glass’ rotation in large animal medicine has been fairly quiet, except for one vociferous miniature donkey named Leslie who is in for a general checkup. Seems simple enough, but Leslie has quite the mind of her own!

Vet School is produced by Thinkfactory Media for Nat Geo WILD. Thinkfactory Media executive vice president is Adam Reed, creative director is Adam Freeman, and executive producer is Lisa Tanzer. For Nat Geo WILD, executive producer is Jenny Apostol, senior vice president of development and production is Janet Han Vissering, and executive vice president and general manager is Geoff Daniels.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (October 19, 2011) The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) has awarded the Robert L. Kelly Memorial Scholarship to Rebecca Csomos, Ph.D., who is originally from Toledo, Ohio. A student at the prestigious University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) School of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Csomos receives $2,500 for her veterinary studies and interest in canine heart diseases.

 

“I was ecstatic and honored to receive the CHF scholarship,” said Dr. Csomos, who is using the scholarship to pay for her tuition at UPenn. “I adore purebred dogs and respect the mission of CHF. It is nice to have CHF support a rising VMD-Ph.D. who aspires to work in translational medicine for dogs.”

 

Dr. Csomos, who has always had a keen interest in scientific research, earned a Ph.D. in molecular and cellular pathology from the University of Michigan. While there, she primarily studied cell death signaling in cancer, the innate immune response, and the effects of copper on protein function. She is taking this background and now applying it to canine disease research.

 

“When I started vet school, I volunteered in the Cardiology department to help with enrollment for an ongoing study by Boehringer Ingelheim to assess the use of Pimobendan in Dobermans with asymptomatic dilated cardiomyopathy,” said Dr. Csomos. That volunteer work moved her to rescue a purebred Doberman named Euro, now three years old. “I love Dobermans and  

Cardiology. I hope to complete a residency in Cardiology and conduct clinical research to help advance our understanding and treatments for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Dobermans, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) in Boxers and other cardiovascular diseases that afflict dogs.”

 

The Robert L. Kelly Memorial Scholarship is named for one of CHF’s founding directors and former American Kennel Club board member and is presented annually to students pursuing dual degrees in veterinary medicine and research.

 

CHF is a non-profit organization dedicated to funding research to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Visit CHF online at www.akcchf.org for more information about the Foundation.

 

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About CHF

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs live longer, healthier lives by funding research that helps prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Established by the American Kennel Club in 1995, CHF’s mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding sound scientific research and supporting the dissemination of canine health information. Since its inception, CHF has dedicated more than $33.2 million to canine health research projects and education programs. Visit CHF online at www.akcchf.org for more information.