Displaying items by tag: The Birds

In this absorbing and surprising memoir, one of the biggest names of classic Hollywood—the star of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds and Marnie—tells her story, including never-before-revealed experiences on the set of some of the biggest cult films of all time . . . now with a foreword by Melanie Griffith

For decades, Tippi Hedren’s luminous beauty radiated from the silver screen, enchanting moviegoers and cementing her position among Hollywood’s elite—beauty and star power that continue to endure. For too long Hedren’s story has been told by others through whispered gossip and tabloid headlines. Now, Hedren sets the record straight, recalling how a young and virtuous Lutheran girl from small-town Minnesota became a worldwide legend—as one of the most famous Hitchcock girls, as an unwavering animal activist, and as the matriarch of a powerful Hollywood dynasty that includes her movie star daughter Melanie Griffith, and rising star Dakota Johnson, her granddaughter.

For the first time, Hedren digs deep into her complicated relationship with the man who discovered her talent, director Alfred Hitchcock, the benefactor who would become a repulsive and controlling director who contractually controlled her every move. She speaks openly about the dark pain she endured working with him on their most famous collaborations, The Birds and Marnie, and finding the courage she needed to break away.

Hedren’s incandescent spirit shines through as she talks about working with the great Charlie Chaplin, sharing the screen with some of the most esteemed actors in Hollywood, her experiences on some of the most intriguing and troubling film sets—including filming Roar, one of the most dangerous movies ever made—and the struggles of being a single mother—balancing her dedication to her work and her devotion to her daughter—and her commitment to helping animals.

Filled with sixteen pages of beautiful photos, Tippi is a rare and fascinating look at a private woman’s remarkable life no celebrity aficionado can miss.

Washington, D.C., January 5, 2017 -- Today is Born Free USA’s 15th annual National Bird Day: a day to raise awareness for wild and captive birds everywhere.

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation: “We want to use this day to remind the public that birds belong in the wild. They do not deserve to be bred in captivity in unregulated, often miserable conditions. They deserve to fly and not be traded and sold as pets where they spend their lives in cages, and where people cannot possibly meet the complicated needs of a bird.”

National Bird Day is a time to celebrate birds for the true wild animals they are,” Roberts adds.

Born Free USA’s facts about birds:

  1. How many species of birds are there? There's no single correct or universally agreed-upon number, and that's because there is more than one definition of "species." By one definition, there are 18,000-20,000 bird species; by another definition, there are only half that.
  2. Blackbird singing in the dead of night. "Blackbird," a song on the Beatles' White Album, is said to have been inspired by the U.S. Civil Rights Movement.
  3. The Birds. Alfred Hitchcock's 1963 film The Birds employed live birds in many scenes. To attract the birds, actors often had ground meat or fish smeared on their hands.
  4. Indeed, a very Big Bird. Big Bird, a beloved character on the children's program Sesame Street, debuted in 1969. He is 8 feet 2 inches (249 cm) tall.
  5. Keep on Rockin'! The common pigeon we see in cities around the world (and sometimes in rural or wilderness areas) used to be called the Rock Dove, but it's now called the Rock Pigeon. It's a feral, domesticated variation of the wild type found in Europe, Africa, and Asia.
  6. Edgar Allen Poe's famous narrative poem, "The Raven," was first published in The Evening Mirror on January 29, 1845.
  7. Now, that's old! Parrot fossils have been found that date back as far as 60 million years.
  8. The bald eagle. The bald eagle is the national bird of the United States, but Benjamin Franklin had originally argued that the turkey would have been a more appropriate symbol.
  9. This is what is sounds like. Prince's 1984 song "When Doves Cry" stayed at number one on the Billboard Music Chart for five weeks, keeping Bruce Springsteen's "Dancing in the Dark" from reaching the top spot.
  10. Kept captive around the world... Turacos and louries—long-tailed, medium-sized birds—are only found in the wild in Africa, but we commonly see them in zoos.
  11. Beep, beep! Looney Tunes characters The Roadrunner and Wile E. Coyote debuted in 1949. Their adversarial relationship was inspired in part by Tom and Jerry.
  12. The bird is the word. "Surfin' Bird" by The Trashmen was released in 1964. The song regained fame and notoriety after it was featured in a television episode of Family Guy.
  13. I smell an advantage for this owl. Great Horned Owls are found in every mainland state and Canadian province—and they have a really bad sense of smell! But, that's good for them, because a major prey species for this owl is the skunk. The skunk's best defense, a foul-smelling spray from their anal scent glands, does not deter the Great Horned Owl. Museum specimens of the owls, decades old, often retain traces of the skunk odor!
  14. The Last Suppers. In his two frescos of "The Last Supper," painted in Florence in 1480 and 1482, Renaissance artist Domenico Ghirlandaio prominently featured flying peacocks. Art historians believe the peacocks are meant to emphasize the "Oriental" setting of the Last Supper scene.
  15. And, a partridge in a pear tree. In the song "The 12 Days of Christmas," a holiday season standard, the singer's true love gives her 364 gifts—184 of which are birds.

For more information on how to celebrate the wildness of all birds and help birds in captivity, please visit www.nationalbirdday.org. For bird owners looking for support, visit www.nationalbirdday.org/a_happy_bird.php.

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic “pets,” trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to North America the message of “compassionate conservation”—the vision of the United Kingdom-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free USA’s mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

THE ROAR FOUNDATION SHAMBALA PRESERVE

The Roar Foundation, which I founded as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization in 1983, exists solely to support The Shambala Preserve. Our mission is to educate the public about the dangers of private ownership of exotic animals. Huge numbers of exotic dangerous animals are bred and sold in the United States for illegal purposes. Private ownership presents a grave danger to the public and is cruel and unfair to these animals. More stringent legislation is needed to prohibit breeding and selling. We are actively involved in legislating this on federal and state levels.

Prior to 1983 I had been rescuing the exotic felines since 1972. Up to the present, The Shambala Preserve has given sanctuary to over 235 exotic felines - lion, tiger, cougar, black and spotted leopard, serval, bobcat, Asian leopard cat, snow leopard, cheetah, lynx, tigon, liger and African elephant. All have come to the Preserve after confiscation by authorities, such as California Fish and Game, U.S. Department of Agriculture, SPCA and Humane Societies. They are from roadside zoos and private citizens who realize they have purchased an animal they can no longer handle.

The exotic cat trade is a huge business. According to US. Fish and Wildlife it is on a par with illegal drugs. Once an animal is brought to Shambala, it remains here for the remainder of its life. As a true sanctuary, we do not buy, breed, sell, trade, or subject them to commercial use. Our only purpose is to allow these magnificent animals to live out their lives with care, understanding and dignity. Each has the best human, nutritional, medical, emotional and mental care possible.

There are many ways you can support The Roar Foundation: become a Member of the Roar Foundation, Adopt a Wild One, provide an item from the Shambala Wish List; attend a Safari Tour: visit The Trading Post, become a volunteer, attend one of our hugely popular and unique Sunset Safaris, and for a truly memorable experience, spend an entire night in one of Shambala’s authentic African Tents! All of these help to further Shambala’s educational efforts and support our mission. One special weekend a month, we hold the Safaris where Shambala opens the gates to the public for a small admission fee (by reservation only). All guests must be 18-yrs or older. Please come visit us and support our beautiful Wild Ones.

Shambala is a Sanskrit word that means: “A Meeting Place of Peace and Harmony for all Beings, Animal and Human.”

Tippi Hedren
President The Roar Foundation
The Shambala Preserve

 

 


Cyrus, Xhosa and Zoe

Shambala is home to over 40 big cats: lions, tigers, cougars, black and spotted leopards, servals, bobcats, and Asian leopard cats, who live out their lives at Shambala. All have come to the Preserve after confiscation by authorities such as California Fish and Game, the United States Department of Agriculture, the ASCPA, and various Humane Societies. They are from roadside zoos and private citizens who realize that they have purchased an animal that they can no longer handle. The exotic cat trade is a huge business, just under illegal drugs, according to U.S. Fish and Wildlife.


Jazzy and Tabbi


Alexander

Once an animal is brought to Shambala, it remains here for the rest of its life. As a true sanctuary, we do not buy, breed, sell, trade, or subject our animals to commercial use. Our only purpose is to allow these magnificent animals to live out their lives with love and dignity. Each "Wild One" has the best human, nutritional, medical, emotional, and mental care possible.

There are many ways you can support The Roar Foundation: you can "Join Our Pride" by becoming a member, become a "Wild Parent" through our adoption program, donate an item from our Wish List, attend a Safari Tour or an exclusive Sunset Safari, visit the Trading Post, volunteer, and for a truly memorable experience, an overnight Safari in one of our African tents!


Savannah

For decades, Tippi Hedren's luminous beauty radiated from the silver screen, enchanting moviegoers and cementing her position among Hollywood's elite-beauty and star power that endure to this day. For too long Hedren's story has been told by others through whispered gossip and tabloid headlines. Now, in Tippi (William Morrow; hardcover; $28.99; on-sale: 11/1/16) Hedren sets the record straight, recalling how a young and virtuous Lutheran girl from small-town Minnesota became a worldwide legend-as one of the most famous “Hitchcock girls,” as an unwavering animal activist, and as the matriarch of a powerful Hollywood dynasty that includes her movie star daughter Melanie Griffith, and rising star Dakota Johnson, her granddaughter.For the first time, Hedren digs deep into her complicated relationship with the man who discovered her talent, director Alfred Hitchcock, the generous benefactor who would become a repulsive and controlling director who contractually controlled her every move for many years. She speaks openly about the dark pain she endured working with him on their most famous collaborations, The Birds and Marnie, and how as a single mother while shielded her daughter from her struggles on and off Hitchcock's set.Difficult as her experiences with Hitchcock were, they nearly paled in comparison to her time on the set of Roar-a film starring dozens of live lions and tigers that has become one of the most notorious film productions of all time. Including never before revealed details about the unbelievable making of the movie, Tippi describes how what began as a simple movie about big cats evolved into a sprawling, dangerous endeavor that consumed her career and often put lives, including hers and her family's, at risk. Tippi offers a clear-eyed and surprising look at the perilous chances they took, while also recounting how these events led to years of animal rights activism, culminating in the creation of her very own big cats preserve, Shambala. And yet, through it all, Tippi shows how her career and life have continued to embody her unwavering devotion-to her daughter Melanie, to her animal rights activism, to her humanitarian relief work overseas, and to her art.Hedren's incandescent spirit shines through as she talks about working with the great Charlie Chaplin, sharing the screen with some of the most esteemed actors in Hollywood, her experiences on some of the most intriguing and troubling film sets-including filming Roar, one of the most dangerous movies ever made-and the struggles of being a single mother-balancing her dedication to her work and her devotion to her daughter-and her commitment to helping animals.Filled with sixteen pages of beautiful photos, Tippi is a rare and fascinating look at a private woman's remarkable life no fan can miss.

Born on January 19, 1930, actress Tippi Hedren was discovered by Alfred Hitchcock, who cast her in her two most notable films, The Birds (1963) and Marnie (1964). She later appeared in Roar (1981), which she also produced,

Deadly Spygames (1989) and Citizen Ruth (1996). In 1972, she founded the Roar Foundation and Shambala Preserve, an animal preserve outside Los Angeles. Hedren is the mother of actress Melanie Griffith.

Acting Career

Actress Tippi Hedren was born Nathalie Kay Hedren on January 19, 1930, in New Ulm, Michigan, to Bernard Carl Hedren and Dorothea Henrietta (Eckhardt) Hedren. Hedren was discovered by Alfred Hitchcock, who cast her in her two most notable films, The Birds (1963) and Marnie (1964).

Hedren's later films include Roar (1981), which she also produced; Deadly Spygames (1989); and Citizen Ruth (1996). Additionally, she has appeared in several television movies, including Birds 2: The Land's End (1994).

More recently, Hedren was cast in the film I Heart Huckabees (2004) and starred in the TV movie Tribute (2009), which aired on the Lifetime network and also starred Brittany Murphy.

October 2012 marked the debut of HBO's The Girl, a film based on the Donald Spoto novel Spellbound by Beauty: Alfred Hitchcock and His Leading Ladies, which details the famous director's relationships with several film actresses, including Hedren. In recent years, Hedren has publicly discussed her working relationship with Hitchcock; according to Hedren, Hitchcock made several aggressive sexual advances toward her while they were working on The Birds and Marnie, and when she rejected him, he treated her coldly. The Girl stars Toby Jones (Alfred Hitchcock) and actress Sienna Miller (Hedren).

Life Off-Screen

Outside of acting, Hedren has been involved in various projects. Among them, she has dedicated her life to animal rescue efforts. In 1972, she founded the Roar Foundation and Shambala Preserve, an animal preserve outside Los Angeles. It houses over 65 animals. Shambala also became the home for Michael Jackson's two Bengal tigers after he closed his Neverland zoo.  WWW.SHAMBALA.ORG

Hedren is the mother of actress Melanie Griffith. She was married to Peter Griffith, Griffith's father, for nearly a decade, from 1952 to 1961. She has since been married twice, to Noel Marshall (1964-1982) and Luis Barrenechea (1985-1995), and in recent years, has been romantically linked to Martin Dinnes.